1986-88 Bosch CIS K-Jetronic injected Esprit specific items - LotusTalk - The Lotus Cars Community
 
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Old 05-08-2011, 07:47 AM   #1 (permalink)
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1986-88 Bosch CIS K-Jetronic injected Esprit specific items

With time passing by, I'm getting panicky about availability of sensors/CIS components. I'm thinking about getting "spares" now, before they get totally unobtainable.
Auxilliary Bypass Valve:ford number is 6129467 or bosch number 0280142020
It was used on Ford Sierra XR4i (1984)
Top domains for Bosch auto parts: http://65.39.72.142/Term.aspx?t=20880868&org=50

Considering the function of auxilliary bypass valve and Chapmans "design" practices, do you yhink Audi or Volvo part would fit/attach properly.
Personally I think it would... as long as connectors are the same.

Check the price fluctuations dependent on the model they suppose to fit
Anyting with Porsche or Maserati is 5x more expensive

Auxiliary Air Valve | eBay

PS. What is the easiest way to run couple wires between engine bay and dashboard. I want to add couple of gauges to my engine.

Cheers

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Old 05-08-2011, 11:51 AM   #2 (permalink)
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PS. What is the easiest way to run couple wires between engine bay and dashboard. I want to add couple of gauges to my engine.

Cheers
Regarding P.S., you could follow the routing of the throttle cable.
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Old 06-15-2011, 06:20 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Fuel filters

Just finished installing 85 micron Earl's (PN#230210) inline filter. I plumbed it between the fuel tank and primary pump. On 86-88 Bosch CIS cars the cleanliness of the fuel is critical! Gasoline with hi content of Ethanol is highly corrosive and speeds up deterioration of the tanks. I lost the primary pump to the debris coming from with fuel. Therefore a pre-filter is a must!!!
My fuel accumulator failed, too. It sprung a small leak, probably due to the same reason. My after-pumps filter was full of brown rust sediment! When flushing the tanks, don't forget that most of the crud concentrates in the cross car pipe (lowest point of the fuel system) and sediment trap (right tank, where the drain plug is located).



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Old 06-15-2011, 08:12 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Many of the K-Jet parts cross over to the Delorean. Check with SpecialTauto.com Sometimes the only differences between parts are the way a part mounts. You can always modify the mounting if necessary. At this point I would not be overly concerned about parts availability. Putting parts on the shelf is not always the best idea. Parts age, get misplaced or damaged, and you might not have the part you need. If you do buy a part and try to use it years later and find out it is bad you cannot return it. The K-Jet system is a very reliable and rugged system but it does not tolerate dirt well and because of the many rubber seals it ages and eventually you must replace all of the rubber. Rubber does not store well so you will always need fresh stock. Always keep fresh fuel in the car and if the car is stored for any length of time (over Winter for instance) all of the fuel should be removed. This way, when you "wake" the car up you can start it with fresh fuel. Fuel stabilizer makes fuel less volatile so it stores better. Just what you want, less volatile fuel!!!!!!!
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Old 06-15-2011, 09:41 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Many of the K-Jet parts cross over to the Delorean. Check with SpecialTauto.com Sometimes the only differences between parts are the way a part mounts. You can always modify the mounting if necessary. At this point I would not be overly concerned about parts availability. Putting parts on the shelf is not always the best idea. Parts age, get misplaced or damaged, and you might not have the part you need. If you do buy a part and try to use it years later and find out it is bad you cannot return it. The K-Jet system is a very reliable and rugged system but it does not tolerate dirt well and because of the many rubber seals it ages and eventually you must replace all of the rubber. Rubber does not store well so you will always need fresh stock. Always keep fresh fuel in the car and if the car is stored for any length of time (over Winter for instance) all of the fuel should be removed. This way, when you "wake" the car up you can start it with fresh fuel. Fuel stabilizer makes fuel less volatile so it stores better. Just what you want, less volatile fuel!!!!!!!
David Teitelbaum
100% dead-on. My '87 Injection system is in perfect working order. I use Lucas injection cleaner/lubricant each fill up, I drive the car regularly, I never let the car get close to empty since that could disturb some yukky stuff in the tanks, I use marine-grade stabilizer over the winter(higher-grade than the auto-stuff), and keep the fuel filter fresh.

Do all that - and the injection system will last forever and you may not even have to mess with any seals. My car has an all-original fuel system(sans service items like filters) and its all still tight & perfect.

I agree though that just loading up on parts for "possible" use many years later doesnt really work.
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Old 06-15-2011, 04:36 PM   #6 (permalink)
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I would go easy on injector cleaner. Too much of a good thing. Modern fuels actually contain cleaners as part of the additive package because just about all cars today have fuel injection. What you can do is "once-in-a-while" put Techron into a full tank and then run the tank all the way down. Too much cleaner will attack the soft parts and age them prematurely. Bad enough all of the alcohol (formally known as Dry Gas to us older members!) that is already in the fuel!!!!!!!! It sucks up moisture so if there isn't any in the fuel it will pull it out of the air! One of the big reasons modern fuel does not store well.
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Old 06-16-2011, 03:59 AM   #7 (permalink)
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I would go easy on injector cleaner. Too much of a good thing. Modern fuels actually contain cleaners as part of the additive package because just about all cars today have fuel injection. What you can do is "once-in-a-while" put Techron into a full tank and then run the tank all the way down. Too much cleaner will attack the soft parts and age them prematurely. Bad enough all of the alcohol (formally known as Dry Gas to us older members!) that is already in the fuel!!!!!!!! It sucks up moisture so if there isn't any in the fuel it will pull it out of the air! One of the big reasons modern fuel does not store well.
David Teitelbaum
Actually David, the lucas stuff isnt really an injector cleaner - its a fuel conditioner and fuel system lubricant. Almost pours out like a light oil. I use the recommended amount every tankful or thereabouts. My previous owner used it for years and with everything working nicely as it is now I just kept up the tradition. I believe it counters the effects of the crappy gas we have now.

I agree though - no need to go overboard with any additives.
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Old 06-16-2011, 04:59 AM   #8 (permalink)
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I would still go easy on additives. You never really know how they interact with all of the stuff they are putting into the gasoline nowadays. The fuel system was meant to work OK without your having to add stuff. Keep the fuel system clean and the fuel fresh and that is about all you should have to do. As for not letting the car get low, that is a myth. On modern fuel-injected cars the fuel pump is constantly circulating fuel from the bottom of the fuel tank through the filter to the Primary Pressure Regulator and back to the fuel tank. There could be a small amount of dirt/debris/water at the very bottom of the sump in the tank but it is minimal. All of the junk is supposed to be in the fuel filter. Which is why it should be changed at the recommended service interval or if you get a bad tank of gas. As for "Marine-Grade" it is probably just more concentrated because boat fuel tanks are generally larger. I still say if the car is to be stored any length of time ALL of the fuel should be removed.
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Old 06-16-2011, 06:30 AM   #9 (permalink)
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I would still go easy on additives. You never really know how they interact with all of the stuff they are putting into the gasoline nowadays. The fuel system was meant to work OK without your having to add stuff. Keep the fuel system clean and the fuel fresh and that is about all you should have to do. As for not letting the car get low, that is a myth. On modern fuel-injected cars the fuel pump is constantly circulating fuel from the bottom of the fuel tank through the filter to the Primary Pressure Regulator and back to the fuel tank. There could be a small amount of dirt/debris/water at the very bottom of the sump in the tank but it is minimal. All of the junk is supposed to be in the fuel filter. Which is why it should be changed at the recommended service interval or if you get a bad tank of gas. As for "Marine-Grade" it is probably just more concentrated because boat fuel tanks are generally larger. I still say if the car is to be stored any length of time ALL of the fuel should be removed.
David Teitelbaum
Duly noted - and thanks for the "myth" explanation. I always thought it better to keep adding new fuel. Either way - the last thing I ever want to do is run out of gas so with such a large fule capacity, topping it up regularly isnt a big deal anyways.

As for "length of time" regarding storage, my car sits untouched for basically 4 months: December through March each year. Never more than that. I dont need to empty her out, do I? I didnt last year and she fired right up just as normal and ran good right outta the gate. I filled it to the top with fresh gas and used two bottles of stabilizer. I also ran it for a few minutes to let the stabilizer get through the system, I figured why not?

The fuel filter appears to be(according to my recommended service interval data)a C-service item and thats when mine was last changed. Does that seem frequent enough?
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Old 06-16-2011, 10:25 AM   #10 (permalink)
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The reason I recommend storing the car with empty tanks is that current recommendations from the gas companies is that after 6 months the fuel is considered stale. If you talk to the small engine shops that service lawnmowers, tractors and such they will tell you it is bad after 1 month! The biggest reason IMHO is all to often I see cars that were "parked" for "just a short while". 10 years later that fuel has destroyed the whole fuel system! Besides, when you take the car out of storage do you really want "less volatile" fuel in there because of the fuel stabilizer or would you be better off with a full tank of fresh stuff? Also less to burn if the worst should ever happen.
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Old 06-16-2011, 10:07 PM   #11 (permalink)
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I'd like to confirm that the WUR PN# on our cars is the same. Just to be sure that Lotus installed the same parts from 86 to 88.
Mine is Bosch 0 438 140 026

Here are couple other component numbers. Pump primary 0 580 254 967 (could be substituted by 0 580 254 984)
Pump secondary 0 580 254 979 (could be substituted by 0 580 254 044)
WUR Bosch 0 438 140 026
Fuel accumulator Bosch 0 438 170 039
Air by-pass valve Bosch 0 280 142 020 (Lotus# 910E6754F)
Aux. air valve Bosch 0 140 140 143 (Fits the following applications

AUDI 4000 1982 1983,
AUDI 5000 1982 1983
S: 1982 1983
TURBO: 1982 1983
AUDI COUPE: 1981 1982
GT: 1983 1984
VOLKSWAGEN QUANTUM
CUSTOM: 1983
GL CUSTOM: 1984
GL DELUXE: 1984

Fuel distributor Bosch 0 438 100 144

BOOKS EXPLAINING CIS SYSTEMS :
How to Tune and Modify Bosch Fuel Injection (Motorbooks Workshop), B Watson
ISBN-10: 0879385707
Many good points and lots of information and specifications for all Bosch systems. From the earliest VW systems to the latest. The modify section is short and lacks greatly.

Bosch Fuel Injection Systems, Forbes Aird
ISBN-10: 1557883653
This easy to read manual includes basic operating principles of Bosch's CIS K-Jet, KE and pulsed fuel injection systems; D-L- and LH-Jetronic, and LH-Motonic tuning and troubleshooting; and some info about high-performance applications.

The Best Book:
Bosch Fuel Injection and Engine Management: How to Understand, Service and Modify, Charles O. Probst
ISBN-10: 9780837603001
Thhis is an authoritative manual on Bosch Fuel injection. This is the only book that fully explains all aspects of these Bosch systems: Motronic, L-Jetronic, LH-Jetronic, LH-Motronic, D-Jetronic, K-Jetronic, KE-Jetronic, and KE-Motronic. You will find specific information on the newest KE-Motronic and LH-Motronic systems that is not available from any other source.

IN ADDITION:
Here is a good information about Bosch CIS K-Jetronic injection tuning, trouble shooting, etc.
http://forums.vwvort...6-CIS-Injection

Megasquirt and other DIY parts: http://www.diyautotune.com/
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Old 06-19-2011, 08:02 AM   #12 (permalink)
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NEW TOPIC

NEW TOPIC:

D-WUR FOR BOSCH CIS INJECTED ESPRITS
If you EVER considered adding intercooler, larger turbo or more boost - here is the device which makes it POSSIBLE!
I am are in the process of integrating it into my Esprit. Work in progress.
Here is a manual describing Digitally operated WUR.
UnwiredTools UTCIS™
Trbo Guys suppose to use UTCIS-PT.
http://unwiredtools.com/utcis-pt.asp

http://unwiredtools.com/manuals/UTCI...n_Guide_A2.pdf

If you are interested, PM me for "Group Buy" discount.
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Old 06-23-2011, 07:15 AM   #13 (permalink)
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Hans has rebuilt my pumps for a fraction of the new units price. Fabulous expert!

H & R Fuel Injection Ltd.
(631) 589-1600
360 Knickerbocker Ave Ste 12
Bohemia, NY 11716
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Old 06-24-2011, 05:20 AM   #14 (permalink)
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Regarding long term storage and fuel..there are two schools of thought on this. One is drain the tanks, which David has explained well. The other is to leave the tanks full. This really is done to stop moisture accumulating in the tank and rusting it from the inside out. Which is better is a personal choice.
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Old 06-24-2011, 05:44 AM   #15 (permalink)
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I respectfully disagree. Moisture is going to get into the tank. I think we can all agree on that. The question is under what conditions will there be the *least* amount of damage over time. I would take a small amount of water at the bottom of the tank (which will accumulate under ALL circumstances) than a tankful of contaminated, highly combustible fuel which will rot everything it touches, not just the stuff at the bottom of the tank. I agree it is always a personal choice how the car will be stored but empty is preferable to full. Now the big question, what do you do for the brake system? Eventually the brake fluid absorbs enough moisture to start rotting the internal metal parts. One possibility is to flush the system every year or two. Usually not practical and doubtful it would be done. Difficult to completely drain so the only real choice is to substitute another fluid. Now the question becomes "What fluid"? Don't forget the clutch hydraulics.
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Old 06-24-2011, 06:55 AM   #16 (permalink)
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I respectfully disagree. Moisture is going to get into the tank. I think we can all agree on that. The question is under what conditions will there be the *least* amount of damage over time. I would take a small amount of water at the bottom of the tank (which will accumulate under ALL circumstances) than a tankful of contaminated, highly combustible fuel which will rot everything it touches, not just the stuff at the bottom of the tank. I agree it is always a personal choice how the car will be stored but empty is preferable to full. Now the big question, what do you do for the brake system? Eventually the brake fluid absorbs enough moisture to start rotting the internal metal parts. One possibility is to flush the system every year or two. Usually not practical and doubtful it would be done. Difficult to completely drain so the only real choice is to substitute another fluid. Now the question becomes "What fluid"? Don't forget the clutch hydraulics.
David Teitelbaum
I flush/bleed/renew my brake and clutch fluids every year no matter what. This ensures they have limited contaminants and moisture in them. Its cheap and easy insurance. Everyone should do this.

As for the tanks, my car has been stored full with stabilizer by the previous owner and myself for like 10 years. If this system we used was gonna cause an epic failure of the fuel system I would have expected it to happen by now. My garage is partially heated/insulated and never gets extremely cold and the car is really only down for about 4 months max. I can see Davids points about emptying but since Ive never had an ill effect I think I'll just stay with whats been working for my car.
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Old 06-30-2011, 06:43 AM   #17 (permalink)
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ETHANOL = BAD NEWS

Bad news for our cars!
The idiots in US congress approved increase of the ethanol content in pump gas up to 15%. Soon, we'll have to fight for clean gas like in the Mad Max movies.
Thanx to this website, I found one ethanol-free gas station within 40 miles range.
Here, you may look up one in your area
Ethanol-free gas stations in the U.S. and Canada
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Old 06-30-2011, 09:16 AM   #18 (permalink)
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Bad news for our cars!
The idiots in US congress approved increase of the ethanol content in pump gas up to 15%. Soon, we'll have to fight for clean gas like in the Mad Max movies.
Thanx to this website, I found one ethanol-free gas station within 40 miles range.
Here, you may look up one in your area
Ethanol-free gas stations in the U.S. and Canada
Its approved but there will be a lot of challenges and even lawsuits. This wont just be rammed down our throats. No way. There are WAY too many car enthusiaists amongst the wealthy and powerful to let this happen.

If alls you could get was E15 and that was it, that would be the end of the car hobby as we know it - unless your idea of the car hobby is a dorky, electric car or something.

They'd better be careful here - There will be a LOT of pissed off people if they mess with car enthusiasts If they render my Esprit useless due to some EPA crap.... Ill start a murdering spree at the EPA office.....
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Old 07-01-2011, 08:35 PM   #19 (permalink)
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Its approved but there will be a lot of challenges and even lawsuits. This wont just be rammed down our throats. No way. There are WAY too many car enthusiaists amongst the wealthy and powerful to let this happen.

If alls you could get was E15 and that was it, that would be the end of the car hobby as we know it - unless your idea of the car hobby is a dorky, electric car or something.

They'd better be careful here - There will be a LOT of pissed off people if they mess with car enthusiasts If they render my Esprit useless due to some EPA crap.... Ill start a murdering spree at the EPA office.....
And I will join you. I can see the headline now:

"Today, two maniacs ran over several members of congress cars that appeared to be from the James Bond and BTTF movies."
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Old 07-03-2011, 05:01 AM   #20 (permalink)
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two maniacs
That's the kindest name I've been called in a while!





What's the Link to the 15% Ethanol bill? I thought that requirement was abandoned a few months ago.
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