Rear Caliper Bolt Torque & Loctite/Anti-Seize? - LotusTalk - The Lotus Cars Community
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post #1 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-03-2006, 11:16 AM Thread Starter
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Rear Caliper Bolt Torque & Loctite/Anti-Seize?

So, since I don't have my service manual with me today and my rears needed replacing...

a. What is the torque for the rear caliper 17mm bolt ? Do I loctite or anti-seize it?

b. What is the torque for the rear caliper 6mm socket head bolt ? Do I loctite or anti-seize it ?

And the bonus question.... The 17mm bolts, they look like they are M10 x 80mm but they're the oddball thread pitch, aren't they? If memory serves right, M10 is the only metric size that has 3 pitches... right ? If so, what pitch is that?

Thanks....

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post #2 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-03-2006, 11:47 AM
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What happens if you use both loc-tite and anti-sieze? A tear in space-time?
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post #3 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-03-2006, 12:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PsychoRallye
So, since I don't have my service manual with me today and my rears needed replacing...

a. What is the torque for the rear caliper 17mm bolt ? Do I loctite or anti-seize it?

b. What is the torque for the rear caliper 6mm socket head bolt ? Do I loctite or anti-seize it ?

And the bonus question.... The 17mm bolts, they look like they are M10 x 80mm but they're the oddball thread pitch, aren't they? If memory serves right, M10 is the only metric size that has 3 pitches... right ? If so, what pitch is that?

Thanks....
1) So, are you saying your rear calipers are bad?
2) Or are you just changing the rear pads?
If it is #1 above, did you recently only change your rear tires (A048)?
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post #4 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-03-2006, 01:15 PM Thread Starter
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Pads, thought that would have been self explanatory....

And yeah,if you use loctite and anti-seize at the same time there will be a rip in the space-time contiuum...

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post #5 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-03-2006, 01:47 PM
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You don't need to remove any of the caliper bolts to change out the rear pads.
All you have to do is to remove the rotor (only one hex screw holding it).
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post #6 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-03-2006, 03:20 PM
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Per the manual on rear brake caliper bolts.
Chris
Attached Files
File Type: doc brakes.doc (156.0 KB, 937 views)

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post #7 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-03-2006, 04:31 PM
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Talking Rear brake pads

Quote:
Originally Posted by mlk_f1
You don't need to remove any of the caliper bolts to change out the rear pads.
All you have to do is to remove the rotor (only one hex screw holding it).
Too Funny ! How do you retract the inner brake piston ?

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post #8 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-03-2006, 05:04 PM Thread Starter
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Cheers for that Zvezdah...

And Don, He's "kind of right" in that you can take the old pad out on the outside without loosening anything (just pin removal) and then take one of the two fasteners out (the M10 or the cap head bolt) and then swing the caliper up/down (depending upon which one you remove). But I agree, the easiest way was to swing the caliper in one direction or another...

Alternatively, couldn't you remove the rotor easily ? I didn't try but I did wonder...

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post #9 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-03-2006, 11:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by APOGEE
Too Funny ! How do you retract the inner brake piston ?
The same way you would if you rotate the caliper. Same procedure. Isn't retracting the piston independent of how you get access to it?????????

1) Remove the pins and clip holding the pads.
2) REmove the outer pad.
3) remove the rotor
4) inner pad will fall auotmatically
5) retract piston

No need to loosen any of the caliper bolts. Please correct me if I'm wrong.
It is no Brain surgery, right.
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post #10 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-04-2006, 12:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MyElise
Too many experts here.
Haha, I'm no expert.
But if the expert can't easily see more than one solution to a problem than there is a problem.
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post #11 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-04-2006, 11:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mlk_f11
Remove the pins and clip holding the pads.
2) Remove the outer pad.
3) remove the rotor
4) inner pad will fall automatically
5) retract piston

No need to loosen any of the caliper bolts. Please correct me if I'm wrong.
It is no Brain surgery, right.
I haven't had to work on the rear calipers of my Elise, but since the caliper "straddles" both sides of the rotor, I've never yet seen a rotor that can be removed without unbolting the caliper and/or rotating it out of the way.

You may or may not - depending on design - be able to remove/replace the pads without removing the caliper, but I've never seen a rotor that could be removed without moving the calipers out of the way.




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post #12 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-05-2006, 12:11 AM
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It does work that way on the Elise.

The calipher does not have a second base or frame it's bolted onto. Many other cars do and this usually stops you from removing the rotor.

On the Elise you can just tap out the outer pad and then the space created is enough to remove the rotor and the remove the inner pad.

It's the 'official' method of changing the pads. Unbolting the slide-pins is an option, but not how it's supposed to be done.

Bye, Arno.
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post #13 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-05-2006, 03:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zvezdah1
Per the manual on rear brake caliper bolts.
Chris
Is this from the OEM manual with the car or some type of shop manual?

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post #14 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-05-2006, 05:25 AM
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Yep, the rotor can be removed with the rear caliper in place. Quite slick as a matter of fact. Then the piston can be accessed for pushing & turning (buy a tool for this purpose or be careful and use a pair of needle nose pliers as a spanner of sorts). All that needs to be removed for the procedure, besides the pads, is the retaining pin (drive it out from the inboard side). Did I mention this is a pretty slick setup.

Make sure your replacement pads are thin enough (I think the stock pad material thickness, not including backing plates, is 6mm, although I think you could get away with almost 8mm). With a mostly new (standard width) rotor, there are pads that are too thick (like some hawks and I've seen others mentioned here). Apparantly, the pad shape is some stock viper part, but ours need to be thinner to start with.

FWIW: Including the backing plates, new Hawk HPS front are 14mm and rears are 14.8mm (and these, per the above, are too thick I might add).


Happy braking,

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Last edited by Frank Amoroso; 07-05-2006 at 08:08 AM.
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post #15 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-05-2006, 09:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arno
It does work that way on the Elise.


Hmmmm.... Very interesting (said in an Artie Johnson voice)...


Let's see how many old timers identify the meaning of that...




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post #16 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-05-2006, 12:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MyElise
Personally, I like to get in there and clean everything out and inspect the caliper seals. If pulling a caliper is an issue for anyone you probably shouldn't be doing your own brakes.
Have you try to just remove the rotors when you change your rear pads?
Probably not, you have enough room to clean and inspect the caliper just fine.

Rotating the caliper is no big thing. You get just about the same space with removing only the rotor. Unless you like to remove the whole caliper for a complete inspection each time you change out the pads . Then you will also need to remove the parking brake cable and brake lines. And after you're done, you will need to bleed the brakes. If that is your thing, then good for you. Whatever floats your boat buddy.
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post #17 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-05-2006, 12:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mark.r
Is this from the OEM manual with the car or some type of shop manual?
That's a page from the shop manual. You can buy the .pdf's for a daily membership fee to the Lotus technical website:

http://www.lotuscars.com/ltip/subscriber_new.asp

Read the thread here:
http://www.elisetalk.com/forums/show...t=manual+%2425

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post #18 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-05-2006, 01:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimMullen


Hmmmm.... Very interesting (said in an Artie Johnson voice)...


Let's see how many old timers identify the meaning of that...
"But stupid!"
Except that he's correct.


From Section JJ, top of page 12:
Quote:
Rear Disc Replacement
Replacement of the rear discs is similar to that for the front discs, except that if the brake pads are removed, it is not necessary to remove the brake calliper to enable the disc to be withdrawn from the hub.

torque (trk) n. - an excuse for the lack of momentum.
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post #19 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-05-2006, 01:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MyElise
15 seconds and no you don't.

Great shortcut F1. Keep up the good work!

Looking for some meaningful technical information to argue about and coming up short.

I guess you just don't get the point. Why don't you try the other method before you start talking. It will save you a little time but by no means is a SHORT CUT. I've done it both ways. And I find it easier to just remove the rotor. I don't need to waste my time arguing with you on this subject. If you prefer to rotate the caliper, then do it. But I just find it too funny for someone that haven't try it yet to talk like this. But after all, if you have tried both ways, it all comes down to personal preference. No right or wrong way of doing it. Just that the other way is a little faster. Cheers.
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post #20 of 27 (permalink) Old 07-05-2006, 05:10 PM
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Thumbs up My Apology

Quote:
Originally Posted by mlk_f1
The same way you would if you rotate the caliper. Same procedure. Isn't retracting the piston independent of how you get access to it?????????

1) Remove the pins and clip holding the pads.
2) REmove the outer pad.
3) remove the rotor
4) inner pad will fall auotmatically
5) retract piston

No need to loosen any of the caliper bolts. Please correct me if I'm wrong.
It is no Brain surgery, right.
I'm sorry I rushed a responce to your method, I started a little early on the holiday cheer. Thank's for the post.
All the best, Don

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the deep sense of being is from, and where your body and soul want to go''. Joseph Campell
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