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-   -   Advice to new Elise owners (https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/f118/advice-new-elise-owners-8027/)

Allan Gibbs 12-02-2004 07:38 PM

Advice to new Elise owners
 
I just thought those who have their cars could have some advice to those who are about to pick their up.

Here's some of mine:

1) Be careful when you let go of your seat belt. It's possible it could scratch parts of the door's paint section.

2) Be careful when you get in an out of the car. Your shoes can scuff or scratch the paint or leather trim.

3) Work on a technique to get in and out of the car. Eventually, your muslces will strengthen and getting in and out will be easier.

4) Brake lights don't light up immediately when you press them. The dealer can make adjustments.

5) What out for blind spots due to the roll bar. If you turn your head, you should be able to see past the blind spot.

6) The Elise has a short wheel base and little steering inputs translates to large directional changes. The Elise steers very quickly.

7) When you open the trunk, watch out for belt buckles which may scratch the rear clam shell. Watch the key and key chain because it could scratch the deck lid.

8) Don't leave your key in the ignition or leave it in th accessory position for too long. It may drain the battery.

9) Take step inclines or speed bumps either slowly or at an angle. If you scratch the clam shell, it could be very costly.

10) It may take some time to get use to your point of view, especially when pulling up to larger cars in traffic.

That's all I could think of for now.

MOKOSpeeD 12-02-2004 07:49 PM

Isn't there a certain way you're supposed to hold the gas pump when filling up to prevent scratches or overfilling?

xxxotic 12-02-2004 08:11 PM

Also practice putting the softtop on two or three times until you can do it in only a few seconds and make sure that you never leave the keys in the trunk, since there is no interior trunk release.

Never use the windshield as a brace to get in or out of the car and adjust your mirrors before driving off in the car, since the visabilty is a lot less than you are used to.

Wear narrow shoes so you get used to the pedal placement instead of wearing sneakers which might cause you to step and the gas and brake at the same time.

ekological 12-02-2004 09:17 PM

You should also get into a habit of using the engine cover support rod since lifting the lid too far can cause the cover to hit the rear clam. ...um...fancy for saying you can open the lid too much...

eliseowner2b 12-02-2004 09:50 PM

I've got a couple to add.

1) If you do not drive your car for 4-5 days you might want to put a battery tender on your batt. Mine was flat dead after 6 days in the garage.

2) If you have LSS and you are on a cold street, don't assume you have tons of grip. (unless of course you know they are really warmed up)

3) Don't hurry when you are around the car. I shut the gas door on the gas cap and drove about 1 mile before I realized it. The slight abrasion from the cap buffed out fully but it did happen because I was just wanting back in the seat so bad.

4) Make sure loose items are secure. Putting a garage door opener or a cell phone in the little rubber cubbies doesn't mean they are going to stay. This car can really put some g's! I got a nose bleed from the brakes once!

5) If you do lock yourself in the trunk, just pull the handle and all will be well.

JWA 12-02-2004 10:55 PM

Hey Allan, did you finally get your car? I must have missed that. Did you post any pics? What do you think of the BRP now that you have it?

--Josh

MikeAR303 12-02-2004 11:22 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by MOKOSpeeD
Isn't there a certain way you're supposed to hold the gas pump when filling up to prevent scratches or overfilling?
My method has been to carry a soft rag with me in the car and put it in between the handle of the fuel nozzle and the car. It's fine on some nozzles, but on others the handle will rest on your car and scratch the paint. I've also made a habit of using the same rag on the tip of the fuel nozzle when removing it to avoid letting excess fuel drip on the paint.

Allan Gibbs 12-03-2004 07:59 AM

Idling. The Elise's ECU needs to "learn" the atmosphere. So, you should let the engine idle (about 10 to 15 seconds) when you start and stop the engine.

This helps reduce or eliminate an unstable idle because the engine learns how to adjust to standing still (as opposed to being in the driving rpm range).

nak 12-03-2004 08:09 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by MikeAR303
My method has been to carry a soft rag with me in the car and put it in between the handle of the fuel nozzle and the car. It's fine on some nozzles, but on others the handle will rest on your car and scratch the paint. I've also made a habit of using the same rag on the tip of the fuel nozzle when removing it to avoid letting excess fuel drip on the paint.
You do have good *FIRE* insurance on your car? Or did you fnot bother to mention the approved metal container with snap down lid to keep the rag in? Or do you keep it in the trunk near the nice warm engine? :eek:

Might I humbly suggest that you grab some of the paper towels out of the rack neext to the pump that holds the window squeege [sp?] and use them instead of the rag and then throw it away right there at the gas station?

I trust we've all seen those dreadful pics of Elise burned to the ground.

JimK 12-03-2004 08:50 AM

Have others noted a tendency for the battery to discharge this quickly?!

MikeAR303 12-03-2004 09:01 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by nak
You do have good *FIRE* insurance on your car? Or did you fnot bother to mention the approved metal container with snap down lid to keep the rag in? Or do you keep it in the trunk near the nice warm engine? :eek:

Might I humbly suggest that you grab some of the paper towels out of the rack neext to the pump that holds the window squeege [sp?] and use them instead of the rag and then throw it away right there at the gas station?

I trust we've all seen those dreadful pics of Elise burned to the ground.

:rolleyes:

A.) The two or three drops of gasoline that get on the rag when I use it are not going to ignite spontaneously.

B.) Even if they did, it wouldn't take me long to figure out that the rag was burning and toss it out of the car.

C.) The rag does get washed at least once a week.

Z3convert 12-03-2004 09:46 AM

Just adding soemthing important somebody else has pointed out.

Let the car warm up adequately (until a temperture number reads in the digital display) before getting on the car and going into the second cam.

YELOTUS 12-03-2004 10:06 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by JimK
Have others noted a tendency for the battery to discharge this quickly?!
Nope...haven't had that happen???
Michael

Cisitalia 12-03-2004 05:12 PM

Until the car is warmed up the red shift light has a lower RPM limit (varies 5000-6000 RPM) for each gear. So try not operate the engine at RPMs higher than when the light comes on. This will restrict operation into the second cam.

I would not get into the second cam until at normal operational temperature which seems to be 186 degress in my car with ambient temps in the 40s and 50s.

It is easier getting in/out of the car by places the seat all the way back. First time I have ever had to do that. Passenger seat is fixed all the way back already.

ivan1 12-04-2004 05:13 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by JimK
Have others noted a tendency for the battery to discharge this quickly?!
no, I have a trickle charger, but left my car 9 days without the charger on and it was fine...

I wanted to add that someone scratched the black base of the handbrake with the seatbelt in my car while trying to fasten..it was an an easy touch up though...

MotorCade 12-04-2004 06:32 AM

regarding fueling technique... I just hold the handle while pumping, so it doesn't rest on the bodywork, then when it's done fueling, I hold the fuel cap under and touching the tip of the pump to prevent drips on the paint. That way I don't have to carry a rag with me.
It's worked perfect so far.

Cade

plesset 12-05-2004 02:23 PM

If you are over 6 feet tall remove the sun shades. They really are not needed since you can just lean back if the sun is in your eyes and without them you can see traffic lights when stopped at a red light.

Brian 111 12-06-2004 05:26 AM

Originally posted by MOKOSpeeD:
Quote:

Isn't there a certain way you're supposed to hold the gas pump when filling up to prevent scratches or overfilling?
I've used an OEM rubber gas flap for 911s for a long time. It is a rectangular rubber sheet that clips around the filler and rolls out of the fender. A rag underneath it may be a good idea on the Elise due to the fender contour. $ 6; p/n 9732 at: www.automotion.com .

Brian

JLElise 12-07-2004 09:22 PM

Gas Bib
 
I posted this in a different thread but thought it may be appropriate here as well. I bought this gas bib and works pretty well...http://www.autoxpressions.com/gasbib.html

pianomaniac 12-07-2004 09:30 PM

Re: Gas Bib
 
Quote:

Originally posted by JLElise
I posted this in a different thread but thought it may be appropriate here as well. I bought this gas bib and works pretty well...http://www.autoxpressions.com/gasbib.html
My gas bib works extremely well. I take one of THEIR paper towels........remove the gas cap......position the paper towel under the gas cap.....position the nozel into the filler and..............voila.......a gas bib!


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