X180 IMPROVEMENTS - Page 8 - LotusTalk - The Lotus Cars Community
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post #141 of 495 (permalink) Old 02-22-2015, 07:14 AM Thread Starter
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OIL THERMOSTAT, REMOTE OIL FILTER

This is one of the best mods for the engine. All pre-84 Esprits had an oil-stat, but not later cars. Bought from Burton PowerUK, PN# MOTC B-
Dunno why?

Since it has been documented very well before, I'm posting a link

Oil stat? - Page 4 - Engine/Ancilliaries - The Lotus Forums - Page 4
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post #142 of 495 (permalink) Old 02-25-2015, 12:50 PM Thread Starter
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LOTUS SPRING RATES

FYI:

OE LOTUS SPRINGS:
86/87/(and 88?) Turbo Esprit Wiki - Esprit.TechnicalData

88 Federal & non-SE 89: (17% anti-dive geometry),
Front: Rate– 22.8 N/mm / 130 Lb/in, Free Length–369mm (14.5”), Static Length– 203mm (10”), 585# preload, ride hgt 170mm
Total with ARB in the corner = 270 lbs/in; ARB rate=0 in the straight line motion
Rear: Rate– 27.5 N/mm / 157 Lb/in, Free Length–334mm (13.15”), Static Length– 205.7mm (8”), 808# preload, ride hgt 170mm
ARB: 17.5 mm dia. front anti-sway bar, confirmed! Rate: 140 lbs/in

89+ SE (22% pro-dive geometry)
Front: Rate– 29.1 N/mm /166 Lb/in, Free Length–372mm (14.6”), Static Length– 219mm (8.62”), 992# preload, ride hgt 190mm
Total with ARB in the corner = 306lbs/in, ARB rate=0 in the straight line motion
Rear: Rate– 27.5 N/mm / 157 Lb/in, Free Length–347mm (13.7”), Static Length– 218mm (8.6”), 800# preload, ride hgt 170mm
ARB: 17.5 mm dia. front anti-sway bar Rate: 140 lbs/in

1990 X180R
Front: Rate- 40.3 N/mm /230 lb/in
Total with ARB in the corner = 370 lb/in; ARB rate=0 in the straight line motion
Rear: Rate- 31.0 N/mm 177 lb/in
ARB: 17.5* mm dia. front anti-sway bar Rate: 140 lbs/in OR 15 mm * ? To be verified

S4
Front: Rate – 36 N/mm / 205 Lb/in
Total with ARB in the corner = 290 lbs/in; ARB rate=0 in the straight line motion
Rear: Rate – 39 N/mm / 225 Lb/in
ARB: 15 mm dia, Rate: 85 lbs/in

S4s
Front: Rate – 41 N/mm / 234 Lb/in, Free Length - N/A, Static Length– 214mm (8.43”) (From Jeremy Walton’s book “The official story”)
Total with ARB in the corner = 319 lbs/in; ARB rate=0 in the straight line motion
Rear: Rate – 45 N/mm / 257 Lb/in, Free Length - N/A, Static Length– 227mm (8.93”)
15 mm dia. front anti-sway bar, Rate: 85 lbs/in

The front damper platform height for each of these measurements is 59mm. The rear platform height is 115mm. The extended/compressed length for the front is 12in./10in., and the rear is 16in./12in.

Sport 300
Front: Rate – 43.2 N/mm / 280 Lb/mm
Total with ARB in the corner = 365 lb/in; ARB rate=0 in the straight line motion
Rear: Rate – 48.8 N/mm / 320 Lb/in
ARB: 15 mm dia, Rate: 85 lbs/in
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post #143 of 495 (permalink) Old 03-03-2015, 08:35 PM Thread Starter
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post #144 of 495 (permalink) Old 03-03-2015, 09:15 PM Thread Starter
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ADDING STIFFNESS

By itself, the Esprit chassis has a pretty mediocre torsional stiffness,~ 6000 Nm/deg, (similar to Chrysler Durango).
Esprit fiberglass body doubles that number, if properly bolted on.

Bulkhead-to-chassis joints play critical role in adding stiffness and constraining the engine cradle movement.
On older cars, these joints were inadequate.
On later cars sleeved anchor plates were added, but the bolts were still the same, puny 8mm.
See a nice write up here:
Bulkhead Mounting Plate Modification

My car had a couple of M8 screws and washers at this important joint. No plate and no sleeves.

Improvement Time!
Got a piece of stainless strip (1/8” thick), a piece of 304 s/s schedule40 pipe and started cutting and drilling. Short pieces of the pipe had to be gun-drilled to accept 3/8 bolts. Next, the sleeves were welded solidly to the larger (cabin side) plate.
Small anchor plate goes on the engine side facilitating nuts installation (which is not easy with engine in-situ), and enabling higher clamping forces.
8mm screws were replaced by AN6 ( 3/8”) aircraft bolts (UTS of 125,000psi) and AN363 all-metal stop nuts from Aircraft Spruce:
AN6 BOLTS ( 3/8-24 ) from Aircraft Spruce

AN365 would not survive welding.
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post #145 of 495 (permalink) Old 03-04-2015, 07:46 AM Thread Starter
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post #146 of 495 (permalink) Old 03-04-2015, 08:00 AM
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here is the finished joint plate
Consider selling? I'd buy!

Kenny; Dallas Tx
==============================
1995 Lexus SC300 - SOLD
1990 Nissan 300ZX - SOLD
1990 Nissan 300ZX Twin Turbo - SOLD
1996 Porsche 911 Cab - SOLD
1989 Porsche 928 S4 - SOLD
1994 Lotus Esprit S4
Test pipe, Ramspott & Brandt center exit exhaust, 2002 center exhaust valance, Alunox performance exhaust manifold, Spax coilovers with Eibach front springs, Elise steering wheel
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post #147 of 495 (permalink) Old 03-14-2015, 08:14 AM Thread Starter
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post #148 of 495 (permalink) Old 03-21-2015, 08:57 AM Thread Starter
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post #149 of 495 (permalink) Old 03-21-2015, 09:40 AM
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Originally Posted by MRDANGERUS View Post
Speed Bleeders for X180 rear inboard Bendix calipers are SB10125 (M10 x 1.5mm).
[snip]
.
Bendix calipers? Do you know the interchange part number? I thought they were some undetermined variant of a Renault R5?

Eddie B
87 Esprit 'SLEEK GT'
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post #150 of 495 (permalink) Old 03-21-2015, 11:12 AM Thread Starter
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http://www.matraclu b.org.uk/ pdf/Brakes. pdf

Here’s some additional parts cross-ref info per Tim Engle.

Brakes, Esprit Rear
1983-84 Renault Le Car front brakes (used as Esprit rear brakes)

Rotor, Esprit Rear
1983-84 Renault R5 Le Car Front (on Esprit rear)
Wagner BD60673
Duralast 3456
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post #151 of 495 (permalink) Old 03-21-2015, 11:55 AM
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http://www.matraclu b.org.uk/ pdf/Brakes. pdf

Here’s some additional parts cross-ref info per Tim Engle.

Brakes, Esprit Rear
1983-84 Renault Le Car front brakes (used as Esprit rear brakes)

Rotor, Esprit Rear
1983-84 Renault R5 Le Car Front (on Esprit rear)
Wagner BD60673
Duralast 3456
I assume that this is applicable to Citroen trans cars, not Renault, correct?
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post #152 of 495 (permalink) Old 03-21-2015, 10:01 PM Thread Starter
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post #153 of 495 (permalink) Old 03-22-2015, 05:50 PM Thread Starter
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Insulating the seat belt retractor bezels

To prevent sound transmission from engine compartment to the cabin, the bezels were lined with some kind of a foam backed fabric (probably scraps of the headliner material).

After many years of baking, rest assured, there is not much left of it.
I found a perfect replacement. This 1/2" Soundcoat acoustic foam has an adhesive backing and it is easy to install.

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post #154 of 495 (permalink) Old 03-29-2015, 11:24 AM Thread Starter
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Cold Air Intake choking your engine

Comparing corrugated (dryer) hose with two 120 deg bends to a smooth duct of the same diameter, the latter is less restrictive.
To read more, see:Use of ribbed hoses and its adverse effects on the intake air flow - Induction/Turbo/Chargecooler/Manifold/Exhaust - The Lotus Forums

See test results here:
http://www.autospeed....html?&A=111369
Scroll down to the heading title "Phase 3" and you see the results.

The air intake behind the scoop is too small and wire mesh creates an additional restriction. It can be opened up to double the cross section area

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post #155 of 495 (permalink) Old 04-02-2015, 06:38 PM Thread Starter
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Dreadful bolts holding (or not!) the air cleaner cover. The most goofy design I've seen on this car.
Blind installation, no direct shot with any tool and too many pieces to hold at the same time (with one hand!).

Solution: recessed Allen head bolt with a large washer and push-nut converts this whole mess into a captive assembly which can be installed together with the cover.
It would work even better if you can find a bolt with the tapered or "dog point" tip.
Use ball point long hex socket which can drive Allen bolts at any angle.
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post #156 of 495 (permalink) Old 04-03-2015, 03:51 AM
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The push-nut retainers are an inspired idea!


Why couldn't you modify the ends of each bolt on a grinder to make them "pointy"?

(And, just ribbing you here, I see you used "Lotus-Grade" type bolts...as they are rusting already! Stainless is the way to go in this application, which is not strength-critical. )

Atwell Haines
'88 Esprit
Succasunna, NJ USA


"Not all angels have wings." - Turbo R
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post #157 of 495 (permalink) Old 04-03-2015, 08:05 AM Thread Starter
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Good point about points. This is my prototype assembled with garage-found (random) objects. Refinement on the way. Sems-type bolts would be perfect for this application, but I couldn't find SEMS Allen bolts.
Pink epoxy seals/levels all gaps/dips/crevasses, eventually it will get a coat of paint.

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post #158 of 495 (permalink) Old 04-05-2015, 05:07 PM Thread Starter
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Check Your Own Alignment

Quick toe-checking technique

Here's a really easy, fast, two-person way to check toe
1. Drive the car to a level parking place. Ideally you want the car loaded as it will be when it is driven (e.g. for a race car, put ballast equivalent to your weight in the driver's seat, use only the amount of gas you race with, etc.). In practice, alignment doesn't change that much with loading, though, so you don't need to be this anal about it if you don't want to. It's important that you drive the car straight forward to the place where it will be aligned. Once you turn the wheel, or jack the car up and then set it down again, you've changed the static alignment and the numbers you measure will be wrong.
2. Get two straight pins and stick one into each front (or rear, if you're checking rear alignment) tire on the rear of the tire at some constant height H above the ground. H should be lower than the ground clearance of your car in the neighborhood of the wheels.
3. In the tape measure I use, I pierced a hole slightly bigger than the pin head at about the 6 in. mark (in the middle of the curvature of the tape).
You can now hang the hole on the tape on the pin head; this allows you to measure the distance without a helper 3. Have a friend hold one end of a tape measure against the tire starting at one pin. You stand on the other side of the car, pull the tape measure so that there's no slack and measure to the other pin.
4. Roll the car forward (not back, you'll roll over the pins!) until the pins now stick out the front end of the tires and are again at height “H” (use a piece of 2x6 standing on end).
5. With friend, again measure distance between the pins. The difference between these measurements is your toe. Notes: you don't need pins (in fact, I seldom use them) as long as you can pick a repeatable place on the tread from which to measure. Measure as high as you can, because you get better accuracy that way (the tire sticks out higher up, so you're measuring bigger numbers and your error is a smaller percentage).
If you want a bit more accuracy, then put the car on alignment plates. Get four thin squares (about 6"x6"x3/16", say) of smooth metal. Use them to make two sandwiches of metal outside, oil or grease inside. Now put one sandwich under each tire. Now you have an alignment plate just like the professionals use (only a lot cheaper) and you can turn the wheel, move the car, etc. without screwing up your static toe measurement.
Another toe-checking techniques
One-person toe measurement: This is considerably more hassle, but there are several ways to do it. You can set up two strings parallel to each other and to each car's center-line and measure from the strings to the front and back edges of your wheels. (Setting up the strings takes from 20 minutes to over an hour; once they're set up, checking the toe takes about one minute to do all four wheels, unless you trip over the strings, in which case you have to set them up all over again.) I hate this method.
A method I like better is to drop a vertical (using a plumb-bob) from the center line of the front and rear of each tire. Do all four tires while you're at it. Even if the rear is non-adjustable, you might as well check it, because this will tell you whether your frame is straight, so it's a good thing to do on a newly-bought car. Make a mark on the floor of the garage below each tire center line. Now drive the car away and draw lines all over the place and measure all of them: you can get front track, rear track, right and left wheelbase, front and rear toe, and diagonals between the tire center points. Comparing things like the diagonals and the right/left track will tell you how straight your frame is.

Cheap and easy camber measurement

I've tried a few camber gauges but I find them more difficult to use than this method. (I think there are easy-to-use gauges, I just haven't seen one).
If you're measuring camber with the intention of changing it if it's wrong, do that BEFORE you measure toe. On most cars, changing camber will also change toe (but not vice-versa), because the angle of the struts or other suspension pieces which affect camber is not exactly vertical.

Get a carpenter's level. You want one which is slightly shorter than your wheel size . Rest the bottom of the level against some repeatable part of the wheel (like the bottom of the outside edge of the rim, but you'll need different techniques with some wheels). Now swing the level (without losing contact with the wheel) until it's exactly vertical. Using a caliper (you can use a ruler, but a caliper is much easier) measure the distance from the level to the wheel. Now you have your camber in inches. Some trigonometry can give you the camber in degrees, if that's what you want.

Much easier method is using Digi-pas digital angle finder ($35), see pic

What you really want is to have zero camber at all times. When the camber is zero, the entire portion of the tire's tread is in contact with the ground, and the more rubber you have on the ground, the more traction you have. Sounds simple, right? But when you add a cornering load, you get more positive camber on the outside wheels (imagine the whole car tilting so that the inside wheels come off the ground. Notice what's happening to the outside wheels now.), and with most suspensions (e.g. McPherson struts) this effect is made even worse because body roll affects the suspension geometry to make the outside camber even worse. That's why race cars tend to be very stiff. You want to minimize body roll to minimize the de-cambering effect.

If you set the car up with lots of static (i.e. with the car sitting still, no cornering load) negative camber, then when you get into a hard corner, the suspension de-cambers and voila!, you have zero camber on the outside wheels, which means you maximize your cornering traction. Only one problem here: when you're going straight, e.g. when you're braking in a straight line, you have no lateral force on the car, and since you've set up the car for so much static negative camber, only the insides edges of the tires are touching the ground, so you get poor braking performance. This also applies to acceleration, if you have a car with enough power that traction is a problem on acceleration.
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post #159 of 495 (permalink) Old 04-17-2015, 06:54 PM Thread Starter
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How to make rear suspension more robust

The camber beam spanning between rr shock towers distort under the load.
To prevent splaying, weld a rectangular 1/8" thick plate at the middle of the x-beam hat section.
Be sure to torque the 4 mounting bolts very tight.
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post #160 of 495 (permalink) Old 04-18-2015, 08:03 AM Thread Starter
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To reduce the road noise and water intrusion, use large blanking grommets PN# X026B0372Z to block the 4" round holes in the rockers (just under the tanks).
The same grommets are used for transmission fill plug and fog lights access.
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