Garage Floor epoxy/coating/paint - LotusTalk - The Lotus Cars Community
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 42 (permalink) Old 01-10-2010, 02:14 PM Thread Starter
A1 Automotive & Smog
 
Harix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: San Gabriel, CA
Posts: 836
Garage Floor epoxy/coating/paint

Who has experience with garage Epoxy/coating? There's so many of them. I tried the Rust Oleum, but was not happy at all. May be you have experience, please chime in. Here a few of them, but don't know which one to buy

Dura Seal 400
Armorclad Epoxy Floor Coating
industrial epoxy floor coating | epoxy garage floor
Wholesale Garage Floor Coating | Garage Paint | Concrete Floor Coating Kits | Epoxy
UCoat It Do-it Yourself Floor Coatings for a Durable, Protective Finish
Harix is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 42 (permalink) Old 01-10-2010, 02:47 PM
Registered User
 
xxxotic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Florida
Posts: 2,952
Preparation of the floor is the most important thing

If you have a concrete floor, you should prepare it first. Use a zylene based bonding agent and then apply the coating over it. Otherwise it will wear off quickly. I coated my garage with some stuff from Home Depot (forgot the brand) and prepped the floor, but didnt bother prepping the ledge are with the steps or the area that my washer and dryer were on since I figured that that area didnt get any tire traffic

Then I moved the washer and dryer back and moved them again a few years later. I also but some bins on the other area of the ledge. That area didnt hold up as well as the floor area that had been prepped. However, tire wear made some of the paint come up. in the prepped area. I even made sure that I didnt use the garage for a week to let the stuff bond.

I think it might have come up is because our tires are stickier than most. I drove the car into the garage when it was raining and the hot tires in combination with the moisture caused the paint to stick to the tires and come up. If isnt bad and is only in a few spots. I would recommend getting some carpet remnants and putting them where your tires normally would be after the car is parked. This way you will avoid the problem since the tires wouldnt be directly sitting on the floor.
xxxotic is offline  
post #3 of 42 (permalink) Old 01-10-2010, 03:07 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Waterloo, Ontario CA; Atlanta, GA
Posts: 20
You have epoxy and polyurea. The polyurea stuff is like a Rhino liner. Plastic feel, but more durable than the expoxy and it really only takes a day before you can use the floor. You can DIY both kinds. I'd personally have someone come in and do a polyurea coating if I had to chose between the two.

If you are in the house for a while and can spend a little more Porcelain tiles can be done for a 2-3 bucks a square foot and will be more durable and quite a bit nicer than any coating. I saw someone on 6speedonline do porcelain b&w checks and it looks very nice. I'm partial to old skool brown tiles like you might see under a vintage Ferrari in an old villa....
pounce is offline  
 
post #4 of 42 (permalink) Old 01-10-2010, 05:25 PM
Registered User
 
Lotus-Position's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 389
I prepped and applied the "roll-on-rock" system a couple of years ago.

here is a link: Roll On Rock System

The prep for my space was especially hard because I had an oil-soaked mechanics pit (6ft deep X 16ft long X 3ft wide) that I had to de-grease. Also, I elected to cover the stem wall in the garage as well. All up, I covered about 700 square feet. Including all prep and application, I have around 60 hours invested in the floor. It was hard work, but I couldn't be happier with the floor. It looks great and appears to be tough as nails (time will tell). I needed to remove a little bit of it from the stem wall after the application (for some wood finish work) and had to grind it off with a concrete wheel to get it off. After two years, it still looks like the day I finished it.

Most of the coating is made up of the chips. You roll out the base coat, then throw chips until it "rejects" them. Since the chips are heavier than the base coat, they sink in and form a fairly thick layer. I was amazed how many chips it took. It took me hours just to throw the chips. Once it all sets up, you run some kind of blade across the surface to smooth it (I just used the "squeegie" attachement from my shop vac, which also sucked up any loose chips), then lay down a final sealer coat.

Done right (prep is everything!), this is a great floor. Not counting my labor, it cost about $3/square foot. I got advice and the product from a local Custom Garage Interiors store... they were very helpful. Custom Garage Interiors

Good luck!
LP
Lotus-Position is offline  
post #5 of 42 (permalink) Old 01-10-2010, 05:52 PM
Registered User
 
cokey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: brooklyn ny
Posts: 425
pictures please..

steel grey 04' neon srt4 low boost 360hp 400ft lbs.... here for the love of the Elise, Exige and gaining the knowledge before I can get my own...


my car.. https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/f152...ny-pics-62883/

https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/f152...on-some-70889/
cokey is offline  
post #6 of 42 (permalink) Old 01-10-2010, 07:28 PM
Registered User
 
khauger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 71
I installed vct tiles and have been very happy with them I mop once a week or two depending on the weather and rewax once a year in the spring. You just have to keep the garage abave 45 to avoud shrinkage of the tiles.
khauger is offline  
post #7 of 42 (permalink) Old 01-10-2010, 08:39 PM
Registered User
 
ACE51's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Greensboro, NC
Posts: 1,769
our garage floor concrete has a "sealer" that the contractor put on to us un-knowingly, apparently if there is a sealer it adds 3 steps to the process, just checked into this last week... looks like we won't be painting our garage floor anytime soon!

SRA Champion 2011 and 2012.
My first Lotus gave me a track disease. Now working with and racing Porsche's
Rennpart.com
ACE51 is offline  
post #8 of 42 (permalink) Old 01-11-2010, 05:44 AM
Registered User
 
'Nova's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: NJ
Posts: 284
Used Epoxy-Coat. Been on the floor for about a year now, and has held up very well so far.





It's easy to DIY, but plan to spend at least a day in the prepping of the floor - cleaning w/ powerwasher, acid etching, filling cracks, etc. Then for the actual install, you'll need at least a second or third hand to keep it all moving along before it dries. I let it cure 48 hours before I drove onto it.

"Stuff sold by the gram is always going to be more exciting than stuff sold by the pound" - Clarkson

05 Mag Blue Elise
LTW Motorsports
'Nova is offline  
post #9 of 42 (permalink) Old 01-11-2010, 05:48 AM
Registered User
 
ACE51's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Greensboro, NC
Posts: 1,769
^Very nice, looks nice and grippy too.

acid etching? did you have a sealer on your floor?

SRA Champion 2011 and 2012.
My first Lotus gave me a track disease. Now working with and racing Porsche's
Rennpart.com
ACE51 is offline  
post #10 of 42 (permalink) Old 01-11-2010, 05:50 AM
Registered User
 
91MR2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Pillaging, just for fun...
Posts: 1,328
That Epoxy-Coat looks nice...

2012 Lotus Evora S GP Edition #14/14
1995 Lotus Esprit S4
1991 Toyota MR2
1987 Renault GTA

www.91MR2.multiply.com
91MR2 is offline  
post #11 of 42 (permalink) Old 01-11-2010, 07:00 AM
Registered User
 
'Nova's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: NJ
Posts: 284
Quote:
Originally Posted by ACE51 View Post
^Very nice, looks nice and grippy too.

acid etching? did you have a sealer on your floor?
Thanks. I put a lot of it down on the walkways of the garage to ensure it's not overly slick. You really want underneath the car to be smooth as it will make the clean up easier.

I had nothing down, but they suggest you do it. It's super easy with the kit, just get a portable sprayer from HD / Lowes, and it'll take longer to rinse clear and neutralize (you buy a couple of boxes of baking soda) than to actually do the etching.

"Stuff sold by the gram is always going to be more exciting than stuff sold by the pound" - Clarkson

05 Mag Blue Elise
LTW Motorsports
'Nova is offline  
post #12 of 42 (permalink) Old 01-11-2010, 08:41 AM
Registered User
 
dwkoski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 773
I used a commercial epoxy system used in food processing plants on my floor when I built my garage eight years ago. I am at work and so don't have the brand handy but I believe it is Micor. It is a three stage, five part system. First, the concrete has to be acid etched with muriatic acid. Then a two component water soluble and very low viscosity epoxy is rolled on. This actually soaks in to the top 1/8" of the concrete. Before this has fully cured, a second two part, very viscous epoxy with pigment is painted on with a foam brush (rolling this coat results in air bubbles.) The system is meant to be finally sealed against staining with a polyurethane top coat which I did not use (to my regret.) This has been a very durable system and I may touch it up in a few places where I have dropped very heavy objects on it and actually gouged the concrete, otherwise it is still in great condition with the exception of some stains (ididn't know about the stain sealer when I did the floor.) It resists most stains but Dexcool and PVC pipe primer. It is very impact and abrasion resistant. I taped it off with 3M easy release tape and put the pigmented coat on in six foot squares which flared slightly from back to front (for an illusion of greater depth.) I also used a black and white checkerboard pattern with white walls and ceiling and red accents (Texaco memorabilia) and black framed photo's and magazine articles as well as trophy plaques and Lotus stuff.....Dave
dwkoski is offline  
post #13 of 42 (permalink) Old 01-25-2010, 01:39 PM
Moderator Extraordinaire!
 
tesprit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Sharpsburg, GA
Posts: 2,843
I am looking to put an industrial type of coating on the garage floor in the four year old home I just bought in GA. I don't have the time nor the patience to prep the floor and apply the coating myself so my question is, does anyone have experience and/or a recommendation for a floor coating that is professionally installed? I am looking for maximum durability against scrapes and gouges and it will have to be installed by a contractor in the Atlanta area. TIA
tesprit is offline  
post #14 of 42 (permalink) Old 01-25-2010, 02:11 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Waterloo, Ontario CA; Atlanta, GA
Posts: 20
What's your price point? Polyurea is good and you can find people in Atlanta.

I really like porcelain tile, but it's more expensive.
pounce is offline  
post #15 of 42 (permalink) Old 01-25-2010, 02:33 PM
Moderator Extraordinaire!
 
tesprit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Sharpsburg, GA
Posts: 2,843
I am willing to pay up for a product that withstand the abuse of moving machine tools (lathe, milling machine, surface grinder, etc.) and a four post car lift on wheels so unless it is crazy expensive the price is not the issue. I can't do tile due to the shaping of the garage floor. There are raised curbs along all the walls to channel water out the garage doors so the floor is not flat at the edges.
tesprit is offline  
post #16 of 42 (permalink) Old 01-25-2010, 02:46 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Waterloo, Ontario CA; Atlanta, GA
Posts: 20
Gotcha. Is the need for a coating/surface more than cosmetic or are we talking about just needing to clean things up? Polyurea is stronger than concrete, but it will still gouge with sharp objects just like concrete. Porcelain will take a lot more abuse.

In a working shop with lots of sharp objects and welding etc you are often better off with the typical sealing and living with the look.

If you like the idea of tile it may not hurt to have a tile person come and at least make some suggestions on how to handle your floor topology. Who knows maybe you can do tile or maybe you change the curbs a little....
pounce is offline  
post #17 of 42 (permalink) Old 01-25-2010, 03:46 PM
Moderator Extraordinaire!
 
tesprit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Sharpsburg, GA
Posts: 2,843
Quote:
Originally Posted by pounce View Post
Gotcha. Is the need for a coating/surface more than cosmetic or are we talking about just needing to clean things up? Polyurea is stronger than concrete, but it will still gouge with sharp objects just like concrete. Porcelain will take a lot more abuse.

In a working shop with lots of sharp objects and welding etc you are often better off with the typical sealing and living with the look.

If you like the idea of tile it may not hurt to have a tile person come and at least make some suggestions on how to handle your floor topology. Who knows maybe you can do tile or maybe you change the curbs a little....
I would also like the floor to have some "bite" to it so when it gets wet it is not slippery so again tile would not be my first choice. I really want the floor to be more functional (not holding oil stains and such) than beautiful, however only part of the garage will see the shop tools so it would be nice to have the area that will be just driven and walked on to look nice. At my old house I had a bare concrete floor that was sealed a long time ago (read NOT very well sealed) and I grew very tired of trying to clean up spills and messes especially under my lift. A lot of the stains became permanent and it was very hard to keep the floor clean of dirt and metal shavings. I want something durable that can be easily cleaned when needed and still look decent. So, after reading this post again, I guess I want it all!

Last edited by tesprit; 01-25-2010 at 03:55 PM.
tesprit is offline  
post #18 of 42 (permalink) Old 02-24-2010, 07:58 AM
Moderator Extraordinaire!
 
tesprit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Sharpsburg, GA
Posts: 2,843
Well guys, I have my floor coated now. I did a lot of research and decided against the DIY floor systems from a local home improvement store. From what I read, they look great at first but seem to fail after a few years and are very hard to repair once they start coming apart. I ended up going with a professionally installed three step industrial type coating that is supposed to be tougher than the concrete itself and can be repaired if damaged. Premier Garage of Atlanta did the application and I am happy with the result. The downside was that it took two days for the application and another two days to completely cure, but I had very few things to move out of the garage and they could sit outside for four days so it wasn't that big of an issue. The floor was prepped by grinding off the top layer of concrete which removes the contaminated surface and opens the pores in the concrete so the base coating layer becomes permanently bonded. After the floor is ground and vacuumed it is totally white and about 1/8" of the surface has been removed. Here is a photo of the diamond wheel concrete grinder in action (sorry for the grainy photos):

Name:  P2170067.JPG
Views: 70612
Size:  638.1 KB

Next the floor was thoroughly vacuumed with a $3,000 commercial grade vacuum cleaner (think huge Shop-Vac on steroids) and the cut seams were scraped out and vacuumed as well. No water, cleaning detergents, or acid etching were ever used as they claim they will cause the coating to fail over time. Now all the cracks down to the smallest hairline crack are filled with an epoxy filler that remains pliable, but the expansion cuts are left as is:

Name:  P2180092.JPG
Views: 70022
Size:  559.8 KB

Once the crack filler has cured, the edges of the floor and cut seams are cut in with the base/sealant cote of epoxy followed by rolling out the the rest of the floor which makes it look like a finished shiny floor. Note the spiked shoe attachments they wear so they can walk on the wet floor without marking it:

Name:  P2180100.JPG
Views: 78912
Size:  537.3 KB

Name:  P2180101.JPG
Views: 68682
Size:  581.4 KB

The last thing for the first day is to throw down a thick layer of paint chips by hand. These chips give the floor a fine grained granite appearance, but most importantly give the floor some "tooth" so it is not slippery when wet. The paint chips are a mixture of different color base coat sheets that have been ground up and mixed together so they are as tough as the base coat. Once the floor is completely covered in chips it is left to set up until the next morning:

Name:  P2180114.JPG
Views: 81037
Size:  529.8 KB
tesprit is offline  
post #19 of 42 (permalink) Old 02-24-2010, 08:22 AM
Moderator Extraordinaire!
 
tesprit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Sharpsburg, GA
Posts: 2,843
The second day starts off with hand scaping the floor to remove excess chips and to knock off any sharp edges from chips that are standing on end instead of laying flat. This is a very tedious hand scraping process and takes a few hours to complete:

Name:  P2180122.JPG
Views: 406421
Size:  565.5 KB

Once the floor is thoroughly scraped in both directions, the loose chips are blown into piles along the walls with a leaf blower and finally vacuumed up:

Name:  P2190130.JPG
Views: 109362
Size:  691.0 KB

Once the floor has been inspected to make sure there are no rough spots or areas lacking enough chips which need to be corrected before continuing, the two piece polyurea final coat is cut in along the walls and cut seams and then rolled out:

Name:  P2190138.JPG
Views: 244709
Size:  649.5 KB

Once the final coating is applied and back rolled to a consistent thickness the surface is inspected for any loose chips or debris that may have blown into the garage and the garage doors are closed so they are only open a little bit. The floor now has to sit and cure for a minimum of 24 hours with 48 hours being desirable before rolling anything heavy into the garage. The finished floor looks like this and as you can see they completely coat the front edge of the slab as well to give it a finished look. The color I selected for my chips was Quartzite which is a mixture of white, black, brown, and tan chips:

Name:  P2190139.JPG
Views: 94216
Size:  526.2 KB

Finally, my cost for this coating was $4.29 per square foot (discounted from the normal $4.75) so this is not cheap. I'll see how it holds up and report back after a few months.

Name:  P2190140.JPG
Views: 34275
Size:  557.8 KB
tesprit is offline  
post #20 of 42 (permalink) Old 02-24-2010, 08:34 AM
purveyor of lightness
 
darkSol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Leawood, KS
Posts: 4,014
Garage
Premier Garage? Dan, that's the exact same company that did our garage back in 2005. It was absolutely perfect for the 2.5 years we owned the house after that (we moved)



They don't have a Kansas City franchise anymore so when we do our new house we'll have to find someone else

Excellent choice though!

.
d.a..v...i....d

David Thomas Stewart - [email protected]
2005 Midnight Silver Lotus Elise (www.darksol.com)
388hp (342whp) BOE RevX 1676lbs.

Last edited by darkSol; 02-27-2010 at 08:19 PM.
darkSol is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

  LotusTalk - The Lotus Cars Community > Community > Garage Majal

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the LotusTalk - The Lotus Cars Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome