New Build - LotusTalk - The Lotus Cars Community
 3Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 22 (permalink) Old 11-08-2017, 12:35 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
lighterthanair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Prosper, north of Dallas Texas
Posts: 424
Garage
New Build

Everyone,

After spending 30 years overseas, I've finally back in the US for good, just retired, and eager to build a dedicated garage. My Elise has been garaged, but it's just too cramped to work on properly. So I went to a local airport and purchased a small plot on which to build a 60x60 foot hangar. This is what it looks like today.

Electrical and plumbing stubs are in, and weather permitting, we pour the foundation in 2-3 days. Then the building goes up (quickly) followed by the massive hangar door.

What is fascinating is that the guy building the hangar is a relative of Juan Manuel Fangio, the five-time World Driving Champion. He's a pilot himself, but he puts up with us car guys out at this airport...I think he has to, given his namesake.

The second photo is of the hangar he is building for himself. My plot is to the left. He's just a bit ahead of me, which is fine. As you can see, the steel is all there, with the siding. The only things outstanding are the doors, which are being built now, and the hydraulics/control system.

The weather is rainy and miserable right now in north Dallas, but we want the rain to moisten the ground prior to the foundation pour. We expect to have that done within the week. The entire structure goes up in only one additional week or so, including insulation.

I'll post later about my plans for this, and how it will be fitted out. It will not be a "Garage Mahal" per se, but more of a workshop that is well-organized and efficient. Pictures will track the build.

As I proceed, I would appreciate feedback. I've already learned a lot from posts to this area of the forum.

Cheers,

Stephen.
Attached Images
   

'A socialist is somebody who will take your flat-screen TV and give it to a family of meth addicts in the backwoods of Vermont.' P.J. O'Rourke

[B][I]2005 Lotus Elise, Laser Blue;2003 BMW M5;2005 JCW Mini Cooper Challenge (Race Car; 2007 Champion);2004 Acura (Race Car; 2011-2012 Series Champion);
1974 Lotus Europa TC Special (sold, for marital harmony);1974 BMW Bavaria;1973 BMW 3.0 CS; Wife's Car - 2012 Mini Cooper...
lighterthanair is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 22 (permalink) Old 11-08-2017, 01:19 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
lighterthanair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Prosper, north of Dallas Texas
Posts: 424
Garage
Wink Flooring Research and Options

One of the first decisions to be made will be the flooring type for the main floor (there will be a mezzanine over the back 20 feet, which I'll detail later.

Since there will be welding and plasma cutting going on, epoxy is not a good choice. Nor is RaceDeck or equivalents. Stained concrete gets you on a cycle to keep it sealed every couple of years (a pain in the hindquarters), and I just don't like polished concrete. I have visited some higher-end car dealerships in the area, talking to their service managers. The BMW folks (including Mini) all specify "Clinker" tiles in their service areas ("You vill do it ziees vay only, or else!"). These look like subway tiles and are made in both Germany and Italy. They are about 4x6 inches and apparently get their name from the sound they make when tapped against one another.

Other dealerships use something called AutoStone, so I went and talked to them here in Dallas. In the photo below, you will notice that two of the tiles are 'smooth,' while two have a raised, hatched imprint. It turns out that the latter was being requested for the driveup area of the auto service centers. You guessed it...customers were driving their cars into the service reception areas on a rainy/snowy day, and slipping/falling on the smooth tile. So this firm came up with this solution, and the early adopters' insurance claims for falls plummeted. However, for the actual service areas, these dealerships still use the smooth tile. Spilled fluids just have to be cleaned up immediately.

I am still going back and forth, but I am leaning toward the hatched tile for the entire ground floor (bathroom included).

These tiles are tough enough to be the choice of service areas in dealerships, and they will withstand dropped tools, jacks, wheels, etc., as long as they are installed properly.

One thing that is really neat is that they have an extruded aluminum slot which fits over the concrete expansion joints. On both sides is a tile, and in the middle (where the grout line would be, there is a dense rubber line encased in the aluminum. According to the engineer I spoke to, this stabilizes the entire floor during thermal expansion/contraction cycles. These fit right over the expansion joints cut in the concrete. Kinda reminds me of the Chapman mantra of having any part do more than one function.
Attached Images
 

'A socialist is somebody who will take your flat-screen TV and give it to a family of meth addicts in the backwoods of Vermont.' P.J. O'Rourke

[B][I]2005 Lotus Elise, Laser Blue;2003 BMW M5;2005 JCW Mini Cooper Challenge (Race Car; 2007 Champion);2004 Acura (Race Car; 2011-2012 Series Champion);
1974 Lotus Europa TC Special (sold, for marital harmony);1974 BMW Bavaria;1973 BMW 3.0 CS; Wife's Car - 2012 Mini Cooper...
lighterthanair is offline  
post #3 of 22 (permalink) Old 11-08-2017, 01:32 PM
Registered User
 
275 Turbo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: New Zealand (work all over the world)
Posts: 470
This is awesome ! Love your work......I want a giant shed!

2005 Elise 111R, 2litre, 315hp, FF275 Turbo kit 6lbs. Soon to be 400+
275 Turbo is offline  
 
post #4 of 22 (permalink) Old 11-08-2017, 01:37 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
lighterthanair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Prosper, north of Dallas Texas
Posts: 424
Garage
Thanks, but all I've done so far is a boatload of research. I'll keep posting updates with pics if there's any interest.

S.

'A socialist is somebody who will take your flat-screen TV and give it to a family of meth addicts in the backwoods of Vermont.' P.J. O'Rourke

[B][I]2005 Lotus Elise, Laser Blue;2003 BMW M5;2005 JCW Mini Cooper Challenge (Race Car; 2007 Champion);2004 Acura (Race Car; 2011-2012 Series Champion);
1974 Lotus Europa TC Special (sold, for marital harmony);1974 BMW Bavaria;1973 BMW 3.0 CS; Wife's Car - 2012 Mini Cooper...
lighterthanair is offline  
post #5 of 22 (permalink) Old 11-08-2017, 01:48 PM
Registered User
 
Parko's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 339
Garage
Stephen, I think you are winning. At life. This looks like a quite cool project. My regret on my home garage is that I didn't go bigger, I think you will not have that issue! Keep posting your progress.

Parko is offline  
post #6 of 22 (permalink) Old 11-08-2017, 04:16 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
lighterthanair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Prosper, north of Dallas Texas
Posts: 424
Garage
Wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by Parko View Post
Stephen, I think you are winning. At life. This looks like a quite cool project. My regret on my home garage is that I didn't go bigger, I think you will not have that issue! Keep posting your progress.
You are certainly right about regret for not going bigger! I've got a 3-car but with 5 cars, that's a simple math problem. And family members keep wanting to populate it with needless stuff, which I define as anything not explicitly automotive - planting pots, fertilizer, gardening implements, etc. That has been a losing battle, and it's only a matter of time before some dim family member suggests that the Elise be left out in the elements. Hence the hangar.

I asked the builder if I could put in a moat filled with alligators, but he said the association would consider that over the top. I told him they were being small-minded.

Stephen.
chiarov and Parko like this.

'A socialist is somebody who will take your flat-screen TV and give it to a family of meth addicts in the backwoods of Vermont.' P.J. O'Rourke

[B][I]2005 Lotus Elise, Laser Blue;2003 BMW M5;2005 JCW Mini Cooper Challenge (Race Car; 2007 Champion);2004 Acura (Race Car; 2011-2012 Series Champion);
1974 Lotus Europa TC Special (sold, for marital harmony);1974 BMW Bavaria;1973 BMW 3.0 CS; Wife's Car - 2012 Mini Cooper...
lighterthanair is offline  
post #7 of 22 (permalink) Old 11-08-2017, 07:41 PM
glb
Registered User
 
glb's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Chester, NJ
Posts: 10,972
The one tip I can add is about lighting.

My (fluorescent) fixtures are mounted at 45 degrees, between top of wall and ceiling.

This way light floods a large area (vs. hanging lights that shine only straight down).

Got this from an auto engineer and it's terrific.

05 elise (BOE Rev300 supercharged, SSRs, shift tower mods, Multivex; HID hi/low beams); 05 Corolla XRS

Driving Tips-https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/f100...art-1-a-49665/
Moss Emergency Line-https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/f100...cy-line-36631/
Safely Piercing Wires-https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/f129...esting-106438/
Bleeding Brakes- https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/f101...-brakes-241138
glb is offline  
post #8 of 22 (permalink) Old 11-08-2017, 08:24 PM
Registered User
 
chiarov's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Burlingame, CA
Posts: 1,193
Garage
Awesome, please keep us updated. I love to geek out over garages. Hard to find a lot of space here in the SF Bay Area (Peninsula) unless you're a billionaire. Housing is now toping $1200/sq ft and most normal homes have tiny 1 car garages.

I'm starting to think that investing in a light industrial warehouse (for cars and toys) and just staying put living in my condo is the best option.

2012 Porsche 991.1S white
2007 Exige S arctic silver (project)
2005 Elise magnetic blue/biscuit
2010 Audi S4 deep sea blue (for sale)
2015 Audi Q5 3.0T scuba blue
(yes, I like blue cars)
chiarov is offline  
post #9 of 22 (permalink) Old 11-09-2017, 03:38 AM
Registered User
 
cyow5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: NoVa
Posts: 3,807
Flooring right now is the biggest hangup with my garage. Previous owners laid down epoxy before selling, so it looked great and pristine. However, they didn't prep the concrete right, and even standing water will peel it up now. I am with you on how I don't like how bare concrete ages, and I absolutely hate racedeck-type tiles since they really dig into bare hands and knees. Anything with raised features is out, too, since you cannot squeegee it, so that's another nail in the epoxy+flake coffin. I think epoxy will end up winning in the end though since there are some industrial, oil-based ones that are more durable than what you get at box stores. I never thought of the welding aspect, but fiberglass blankets are cheaper than flooring.

"Lots Of Trouble; Usually Serious"
cyow5 is offline  
post #10 of 22 (permalink) Old 11-09-2017, 08:20 PM
Registered User
 
chiarov's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Burlingame, CA
Posts: 1,193
Garage
What about a synthetic wood floor product like Pergo? Magnus Walker loves it and it looks great.

Dunno how it holds up to welding though.


2012 Porsche 991.1S white
2007 Exige S arctic silver (project)
2005 Elise magnetic blue/biscuit
2010 Audi S4 deep sea blue (for sale)
2015 Audi Q5 3.0T scuba blue
(yes, I like blue cars)
chiarov is offline  
post #11 of 22 (permalink) Old 11-09-2017, 08:43 PM
Saffron Yellow is Lighter
 
XtinctElise's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Omaha, NE
Posts: 1,224
Make sure the concrete is at least 6" around where your car lift posts will be mounted. One thing I didnt think about but wish I did was install can lights in the floor UNDER the lift, so you can light up the underneath of the car that you are working on. I have a solution in place now but can lights in the floor would have worked better.

'05 Lotus Elise - Saffron Yellow | Sport Pack | Touring Pack | REV400 - 5.6 lbs/hp | ACT HDSS Clutch | DMC Header | Sport Cat | Larini SE Exhaust | Monolites/R888R | BWR Double-Adjustable Shocks | shiftR111/LETSLA/SSC Cables | Shorai Lithium-Iron Battery
XtinctElise is offline  
post #12 of 22 (permalink) Old 11-10-2017, 11:39 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
lighterthanair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Prosper, north of Dallas Texas
Posts: 424
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by XtinctElise View Post
Make sure the concrete is at least 6" around where your car lift posts will be mounted. One thing I didnt think about but wish I did was install can lights in the floor UNDER the lift, so you can light up the underneath of the car that you are working on. I have a solution in place now but can lights in the floor would have worked better.
Xtinct, the psi of the concrete is around 4000, which will be fine for a 2-post. But I'll be watching the anchors being installed with great care. I've already spoken to the builder about going to 4600.

In thinking about floor lighting, I would just wonder about sealing the unit to protect from moisture, spills, etc. I don't have any idea what code would require on that. However, you've given me an idea. I could fabricate sliding brackets to attach LED lighting to the posts. They could be height-adjustable pretty easily, and could be made to adjust so that the lighting could be put right where it is needed. Underlighting kits are already on the market for 4-posts, running the length of both runways. I don't remember their cost, but I do recall that, at the time, it struck me as being rather expensive.

Thanks for making me think about this,

Stephen.

'A socialist is somebody who will take your flat-screen TV and give it to a family of meth addicts in the backwoods of Vermont.' P.J. O'Rourke

[B][I]2005 Lotus Elise, Laser Blue;2003 BMW M5;2005 JCW Mini Cooper Challenge (Race Car; 2007 Champion);2004 Acura (Race Car; 2011-2012 Series Champion);
1974 Lotus Europa TC Special (sold, for marital harmony);1974 BMW Bavaria;1973 BMW 3.0 CS; Wife's Car - 2012 Mini Cooper...
lighterthanair is offline  
post #13 of 22 (permalink) Old 11-10-2017, 11:42 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
lighterthanair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Prosper, north of Dallas Texas
Posts: 424
Garage
I looked at this, and it just won't work given what I'm likely to be doing in there. I have to keep in mind that these structures do not have fire suppression systems, so I'm going to be purchasing a number of extinguishers so that there is always one at hand.

But you are right...it sure looks great.

Stephen.

'A socialist is somebody who will take your flat-screen TV and give it to a family of meth addicts in the backwoods of Vermont.' P.J. O'Rourke

[B][I]2005 Lotus Elise, Laser Blue;2003 BMW M5;2005 JCW Mini Cooper Challenge (Race Car; 2007 Champion);2004 Acura (Race Car; 2011-2012 Series Champion);
1974 Lotus Europa TC Special (sold, for marital harmony);1974 BMW Bavaria;1973 BMW 3.0 CS; Wife's Car - 2012 Mini Cooper...
lighterthanair is offline  
post #14 of 22 (permalink) Old 11-10-2017, 12:05 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
lighterthanair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Prosper, north of Dallas Texas
Posts: 424
Garage
Progress, of a Sort

My builder is a little ahead of me on his adjacent hangar, and the image below is after the first day of the erection of the structure. I knew these things went up fairly quickly, but this crew is really impressive.

If you look carefully, there is a center beam running normal to the main structural beams toward the front of the hangar. That is there to mount a Big Ass Fan (they are heavy). To those unfamiliar with these monsters, they are quiet and push a lot of CFM. I was in one of the other hangars in July, and with this on and the door opened, it was actually fairly pleasant in there.

My foundation gets poured, weather permitting, in five days.

Attachment 1145713

The Mezzanine:

Along the far (back) wall, there will be a mezzanine running the entire 60-foot span, 20 feet in width. It will be partitioned - 40' will be an air conditioned living/lounging area, while the last 20'x20' space will be a storage area, open to the hangar below. On the nearby support column, I will be installing a jib crane to facilitate moving heavy/bulky items between the two areas. It will be mounted in such a way as to provide about 230 degrees of arc. The 2-post lift will be positioned so that the crane boom will extend to the midpoint of the two lift posts. If I end up doing a restoration, this storage area will hold bonnets, engines, gearboxes, IRS cages, and the like, as well as parts waiting to be restored/replaced. It's really just an area to keep stuff off the floor and everything neat and tidy. Clutter is a great way to lose parts.

The 40' living area will be air conditioned with mini-split units, which seem to be very efficient. The airport regulations stipulate that this area be named "Pilot's Lounge" or "Pilot Briefing Room," so I have to call it that on the drawings. But that's where the kitchen, bar, and TV will go, for watching F1 races.
Attached Images
 
Vantage likes this.

'A socialist is somebody who will take your flat-screen TV and give it to a family of meth addicts in the backwoods of Vermont.' P.J. O'Rourke

[B][I]2005 Lotus Elise, Laser Blue;2003 BMW M5;2005 JCW Mini Cooper Challenge (Race Car; 2007 Champion);2004 Acura (Race Car; 2011-2012 Series Champion);
1974 Lotus Europa TC Special (sold, for marital harmony);1974 BMW Bavaria;1973 BMW 3.0 CS; Wife's Car - 2012 Mini Cooper...
lighterthanair is offline  
post #15 of 22 (permalink) Old 11-10-2017, 01:11 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
lighterthanair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Prosper, north of Dallas Texas
Posts: 424
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by glb View Post
The one tip I can add is about lighting.

My (fluorescent) fixtures are mounted at 45 degrees, between top of wall and ceiling.

This way light floods a large area (vs. hanging lights that shine only straight down).

Got this from an auto engineer and it's terrific.
glb, I recall you making that suggestion awhile back, and I shamelessly stole it.

The only thing is that I have to modify it because of the height of the hangar and the interference of the Big Ass Fan I'm installing overhead. So, I'm using the 45 degree fluorescents under the mezzanine. This is where workbenches, a teardown bench, etc. will all live. I have not decided yet, but I'm considering doing the same thing outside the mezzanine as well, on a pony wall. It won't be perfect, but it will be an improvement. For the overhead lighting, I've simply doubled the number of overhead fixtures, on two separate circuits. They are cheap and the lighting is important, especially if I go with a darker floor tile.

By the way, I saw a photo of the Petty's NASCAR shop, and their engineers actually have a large rectangular frame, lined with fluorescents, that can be lowered from the ceiling when needed. It basically surrounds the car in light. I can't do that either, because of the BAF.

Thanks for that suggestion!

Stephen.

'A socialist is somebody who will take your flat-screen TV and give it to a family of meth addicts in the backwoods of Vermont.' P.J. O'Rourke

[B][I]2005 Lotus Elise, Laser Blue;2003 BMW M5;2005 JCW Mini Cooper Challenge (Race Car; 2007 Champion);2004 Acura (Race Car; 2011-2012 Series Champion);
1974 Lotus Europa TC Special (sold, for marital harmony);1974 BMW Bavaria;1973 BMW 3.0 CS; Wife's Car - 2012 Mini Cooper...
lighterthanair is offline  
post #16 of 22 (permalink) Old 11-11-2017, 07:47 AM
Registered User
 
Rizzydee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Phenix City, AL
Posts: 355
I was thinking for flooring...you won't be welding everywhere. Once everything is in place you'll probably have a metals station with all that stuff once you get your shop flow worked out. So why don't you get what is most practical and cost efficient for the majority of your shop and then in your metal station go with a silicone mat or some other type of heat resistant flooring? More money for goodies in the shop!
Rizzydee is offline  
post #17 of 22 (permalink) Old 11-12-2017, 04:21 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
lighterthanair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Prosper, north of Dallas Texas
Posts: 424
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rizzydee View Post
I was thinking for flooring...you won't be welding everywhere. Once everything is in place you'll probably have a metals station with all that stuff once you get your shop flow worked out. So why don't you get what is most practical and cost efficient for the majority of your shop and then in your metal station go with a silicone mat or some other type of heat resistant flooring? More money for goodies in the shop!
Rizzydee, I guess the problem is that I won't be welding/cutting in just one confined area alone. The kind of restoration I am planning would mean that I'll be on a welding table, but also all around the car itself as well (think of an E-Type, which rusts all over from the inside to the outside from the ground up to about 20 inches - and an Alfa is even worse!).

I'm just trying to avoid the maintenance of epoxy. I've seen what racing paddocks go through, and they have it relatively easy. The dealership service managers have told me that they would never go back to epoxy because of the downtime and lost revenue they had in order to maintain it. Of course, even tile is not truly maintenance-free, since the grout has to be resealed every other year or so. But that's easy and cheap compared to redoing epoxy every 5-7 years, or resealing stained concrete.

Finally, if I do the tile installation myself, the cost is surprisingly comparable to having epoxy/urea/poly done (about 10% more). It's not a job I am looking forward to, but like you said, saving money means "more goodies for the shop."

Stephen.

'A socialist is somebody who will take your flat-screen TV and give it to a family of meth addicts in the backwoods of Vermont.' P.J. O'Rourke

[B][I]2005 Lotus Elise, Laser Blue;2003 BMW M5;2005 JCW Mini Cooper Challenge (Race Car; 2007 Champion);2004 Acura (Race Car; 2011-2012 Series Champion);
1974 Lotus Europa TC Special (sold, for marital harmony);1974 BMW Bavaria;1973 BMW 3.0 CS; Wife's Car - 2012 Mini Cooper...
lighterthanair is offline  
post #18 of 22 (permalink) Old 01-17-2018, 04:34 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
lighterthanair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Prosper, north of Dallas Texas
Posts: 424
Garage
Update and Progress

Well, the steel is finally up, as per the photo, and the apron has been poured. The concrete 28-day tests are showing a fairly consistent 3800 psi, which will improve with time.

The crew that erected the steel have been impressive, as all this was done by 5 guys in one day. If the weather cooperates here in the north Dallas area, they will have the hangar enclosed by next week. The 8000 lb. door is complete except for painting, and that will be delivered late next week for installation via a contraption that looks like a crane mated with a forklift.

I have decided on an air compressor. It will be an Eaton unit, 7.5 hp/80 gallon vertical tank. I opted for this unit because the pump runs at a measily 640 RPM, so it is very quiet for a piston two-stage design, and it puts out a good amount of air.

Some of you from the UK may be familiar with what I'm about to describe next, as the Brits have been using this tool for over a decade or so, but it's relatively new here in the Colonies.

It is a method of cleaning/restoring parts which does not use parts washers (smelly, messy, and often slow) or conventional media blasting (which requires very dry air to prevent media clumping and clogging the gun, thereby ruining your day) and can be messy in the workshop.

This method uses water, air, and a variety of media types (from baking soda to aluminum oxide). What is neat is that it doesn't heat up the part due to the water. The design is a closed loop system, so you use a rust inhibitor to stop flash rusting of a ferrous part. It also does not require dry air. It can be used on plastics, soft metals like brass, aluminum, etc., without changing the media for each one. And, you can clean parts with it (as opposed to rust removal) with sodium bicarbonate. This is done on the principle of super saturation. It looks like a big conventional cabinet, except it is made of stainless steel and has additional tanks for the closed loop water system.

Anyway, I'm going with this rather than a conventional media cabinet and a parts washer. One of the products is a UK import, and another is made in North Carolina. This system will remove rust, powder coatings, dirt/grime, but can be gentle enough to do carbs, pistons, cams, and heads. It can even etch glass.

And I'm meeting up with a Mitsubishi tech today, as they have an AC/Heat Pump design now that allows for up to 8 head units on single phase power. I won't really air condition the entire hangar (expensive) - this is just to take the majority of the heat away so I can work in there during the hot Texas summers. These mini splits are very efficient and a definite step up from conventional air conditioners. They are used all over the Middle East, where much of the construction is concrete block and ducting is a challenge.

Also helping to cool things will be a Big Ass Fan. Mine was just delivered, and is powder coated red with black winglets. Google them if you are not familiar with these guys. I'll post a photo soon.

Anyway, we should be fully enclosed in the next two weeks, so this was just an update. I'm still trying to decide on flooring and lighting fixtures. The first occupants will be the Elise and the XKR, followed by an E-Type I am planning to restore. This will keep me off the streets and swearing at Lucas instead.

Cheers,

Stephen.
Attached Images
 

'A socialist is somebody who will take your flat-screen TV and give it to a family of meth addicts in the backwoods of Vermont.' P.J. O'Rourke

[B][I]2005 Lotus Elise, Laser Blue;2003 BMW M5;2005 JCW Mini Cooper Challenge (Race Car; 2007 Champion);2004 Acura (Race Car; 2011-2012 Series Champion);
1974 Lotus Europa TC Special (sold, for marital harmony);1974 BMW Bavaria;1973 BMW 3.0 CS; Wife's Car - 2012 Mini Cooper...
lighterthanair is offline  
post #19 of 22 (permalink) Old 01-17-2018, 10:56 AM
Registered User
 
TedR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Oregon
Posts: 820
Very nice, looks like it is all coming together.
TedR is offline  
post #20 of 22 (permalink) Old 01-31-2018, 02:14 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
lighterthanair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Prosper, north of Dallas Texas
Posts: 424
Garage
Walls Up, Roof, Installing Hangar Door

We are now making a lot more progress...

The walls/roof are up, and the electrical has been run for the lighting (more about that later). Today we are erecting the door frame, putting up the columns and the cam plates (see photos).

This door is awesome. It weighs about 8500 lbs. in operating mode and will lift a car clean off the ground. That, of course, requires some stout support. We got one of the cam plates in today, and the other one goes in tomorrow. The guys doing the work are top-notch. When bolting the cam plates on, they dutifully applied Loctite Blue to the bolts. And the welder is one of the best I've ever seen.

There is an additional photo for you tool guys. I include it simply because I have never seen this contraption. But it is essentially an electronic manometer, used to level things to a hundredth of an inch. The tube is filled with glycol, and gives a differential reading, plus or minus. The builders of the door use it to level about 12 welding tables to one another, on which this massive door (photos to follow) is constructed, to a trueness of 3/16" over a 58-foot span. The cost of the tool is only about 700 USD, but it must be recalibrated every 2 years, which costs about 350 USD. I don't need it, but I really am looking for an excuse to get it! I'm thinking of using it to level the pads for cross weighting cars. Now if I could only think of more uses for it....

Anyway, the door will be on in another week, whereupon they start installing the mezzanine, which will come out 20 feet from the rear wall and run 60 feet across the back/rear of the hangar.

Still have not decided on the flooring. Taking a cue from one of your comments, I visited an equestrian center, where they had these 3/4-inch rubber-like pads they put in the horse stalls, I guess for the comfort of the horses. Anyway, sparks and welding slag won't go through this stuff, and I'm thinking of using that on the floor where cutting, grinding, and welding will take place. That leaves the option of doing a nice concrete stain or epoxy.

Still looking for a restoration candidate that won't be a financial black hole. My first choice is an E-Type, although a '67 Elan would be very nice as well, and much, much simpler.

As far as the lighting, I have doubled the number of fixtures on two circuits (don't want to be suddenly in the dark while at the grinder, for example, if I trip a breaker). These are 5000K LEDs, 7 tubes/fixture. I've also discovered an LED fixture that's about 7 feet long. Trying to find them now and, if successful, will post photos. These will go under the mezzanine.

So, things are progressing...

Stephen.

.Name:  01312018_01Comp.jpg
Views: 204
Size:  46.6 KB
Columns being erected, anchored into the concrete and welded at the top.

Name:  01312018_02Comp.jpg
Views: 205
Size:  43.1 KB
Opposite side column, using the TEREX (an amazing machine)

Name:  01312018_03_Comp.jpg
Views: 229
Size:  42.3 KB
The cam plate, where the door will be articulated up/down. There is one on each side of the door.

Name:  01312018_04_Comp.jpg
Views: 210
Size:  50.3 KB
This is the tool I referred to earlier.

'A socialist is somebody who will take your flat-screen TV and give it to a family of meth addicts in the backwoods of Vermont.' P.J. O'Rourke

[B][I]2005 Lotus Elise, Laser Blue;2003 BMW M5;2005 JCW Mini Cooper Challenge (Race Car; 2007 Champion);2004 Acura (Race Car; 2011-2012 Series Champion);
1974 Lotus Europa TC Special (sold, for marital harmony);1974 BMW Bavaria;1973 BMW 3.0 CS; Wife's Car - 2012 Mini Cooper...
lighterthanair is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

  LotusTalk - The Lotus Cars Community > Community > Garage Majal

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the LotusTalk - The Lotus Cars Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome