Should We Be Concerned.................... - Page 2 - LotusTalk - The Lotus Cars Community
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post #21 of 34 (permalink) Old 01-02-2005, 01:53 PM
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I was under the strong impression that the green coolant was possibly incompatible with some materials used as fittings for the red coolant.

Also, FWIW, you *will absolutely* be voiding your engine warranty if you don't use the manufacturer's specified coolant.

ed
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post #22 of 34 (permalink) Old 01-02-2005, 02:48 PM
 
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Also, you can't just go by the color. Apparently there are at least 3 (or more) coolant products that are red. For example Toyota has their own red coolant which is NOT the same as Dexcool. There is also clear stuff and yellow stuff. From what I am reading about the dexcool situation there are many other related factors. Such as iron versus aluminum blocks. New gasket materials introduced at the same time as the coolant. Superceded coolant tank caps that are more air tight. And the rise of leasing where folks never raise the hood for years at a time. Many Dexcool issues don't occur if you don't drive around a couple quarts low for a few years. And folks may wish to replace their tank caps from time to time. Not to mention keep things topped off.
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post #23 of 34 (permalink) Old 01-02-2005, 04:41 PM Thread Starter
 
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Don't really understand how switching to
a coolant such as Peak or Prestone could void a manufacturer's warranty. These two brands state that use of their products does not void warrantees and
meet all federal specs concerning coolant.
In lieu of specific legal rights of owners
being confirmed in this regard, it would
still behoove us to check the acidity level
of the factory supplied coolant on a regular basis. There are special 'paper' strips available for the non-green coolants that make this a simple exercise.
Finding out the coolant has reached a dangerous level of contamination before it has had the chance to do extended harm would be the hoped for result.
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post #24 of 34 (permalink) Old 01-03-2005, 10:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Ridgemanron
Don't really understand how switching to
a coolant such as Peak or Prestone could void a manufacturer's warranty. These two brands state that use of their products does not void warrantees and
meet all federal specs concerning coolant.
In lieu of specific legal rights of owners
being confirmed in this regard, it would
still behoove us to check the acidity level
of the factory supplied coolant on a regular basis. There are special 'paper' strips available for the non-green coolants that make this a simple exercise.
Finding out the coolant has reached a dangerous level of contamination before it has had the chance to do extended harm would be the hoped for result.

Read the fine print for which *manufacturer* standards the coolant maker actually meets. (AFAIK, there is no Federal standard for coolant chemistry, other than what the EPA probably specifies for environmental reasons.)

Some anti-freeze may not claim to be compatible with Dexcool, or in this case, with whatever Lotus recommends.

(FWIW, a co-worker of mine with an F-body had a massive cooling system failure due to eroded fittings, when he used green coolant instead of Dexcool - cause being incompatible chemistry.)

ed
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post #25 of 34 (permalink) Old 01-03-2005, 10:12 AM
 
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>>>Finding out the coolant has reached a dangerous level of contamination before it has had the chance to do extended harm would be the hoped for result.<<<

If the coolant color and clarity is good and the cap and tank look clean, level stays high then you have nothing to worry about.

Now then...what kind of air are you using in your tires? Is it certified? When was it last changed? Has it been overheated?

Commence worrying.

Last edited by Stan; 01-03-2005 at 10:20 AM.
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post #26 of 34 (permalink) Old 01-03-2005, 11:24 AM
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i filled my tires up at speedway.
is that bad?
do we need to have the air changed?
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post #27 of 34 (permalink) Old 01-03-2005, 11:35 AM
 
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>>>i filled my tires up at speedway. is that bad? do we need to have the air changed?<<<

Of course that is bad! Change it out immediately. Flush it about 3 (three) to 58 (fifty eight) times using air compressed the day *after* a snow or rain storm. No harsh language during the filling process else you have to start over. Make sure you have a full tank of gas, radio off and no passenger in the car, trunk empty. Since we are in the Northern hemisphere start at the left front tire and then proceed clockwise as viewed from above. Down under start at the right front and proceed counter clockwise. If you do it in the wrong order the wheel alignment (geo for the Brits) gets thrown off. Make sure no one nearby had beans for lunch. Oh yeah...make sure you use air from your state of residence so that the tax laws are followed. Otherwise the man might come knocking on your door.

Don't you realize that that is why your car lost traction when you did those 0-60s? The 4.8 would have been at least a couple tenths better with proper air.

Rumour has it that that guy in the video where his Elise flipped over had air from a *bicycle pump* in it. Sad. The poor car kept trying to get up on two wheels!

Last edited by Stan; 01-03-2005 at 12:13 PM.
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post #28 of 34 (permalink) Old 01-03-2005, 11:51 AM Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by Stan
>>>Finding out the coolant has reached a dangerous level of contamination before it has had the chance to do extended harm would be the hoped for result.<<<

If the coolant color and clarity is good and the cap and tank look clean, level stays high then you have nothing to worry about.

Now then...what kind of air are you using in your tires? Is it certified? When was it last changed? Has it been overheated?

Commence worrying.
don't rely on coolant color being your sole factor in determining whether it is reaching levels of dangerous contamination. The 'acidity level' check strips that are out there for the different coolants should be used to test the coolant each season. It takes nothing more than a minute and detects contamination the human eye isn't going to pick-up.
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post #29 of 34 (permalink) Old 01-03-2005, 12:00 PM
 
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>>>Don't rely on coolant color being your sole factor in determining whether it is reaching levels of dangerous contamination.<<<

Ridge, our cars are all brandie new... One thing about the red stuff is that the additive pack really *does* last a long time. IF things like contamination, air, additives don't complicate matters. One thing I wouldn't care to do is to dump in some auto parts store magic goop into a OAT coolant car. Might not be compatible.

If you read about the dexcool mess in some of the radiator business tech material they say that when it starts to go bad the color changes. Way before there is a repair issue as opposed to a flush and fill situation. These days many folks never open their hoods. If the fluid remains's bright, clear and so forth the acidity and other tests will come out fine. Don't forget that in commercial use the stuff lasts many hundreds of thousands of miles.
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post #30 of 34 (permalink) Old 01-03-2005, 12:00 PM
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The problem here is that nobody has talked about the most important factor concerning antifreeze.



taste



I prefer the green, kinda like gatoraide.


But i have had a coulpe of reds that have their own fine merits.
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post #31 of 34 (permalink) Old 01-03-2005, 12:04 PM Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by Stan
>>>Don't rely on coolant color being your sole factor in determining whether it is reaching levels of dangerous contamination.<<<

Ridge, our cars are all brandie new... One thing about the red stuff is that the additive pack really *does* last a long time. IF things like contamination, air, additives don't complicate matters. One thing I wouldn't care to do is to dump in some auto parts store magic goop into a OAT coolant car. Might not be compatible.

If you read about the dexcool mess in some of the radiator business tech material they say that when it starts to go bad the color changes. Way before there is a repair issue as opposed to a flush and fill situation. These days many folks never open their hoods. If the fluid remains's bright, clear and so forth the acidity and other tests will come out fine. Don't forget that in commercial use the stuff lasts many hundreds of thousands of miles.
Not talking about an additive. These are paper-like strips that you dip into the coolant for a second, just to let it react with the acid-level-squares on the paper. The color-change that ocurs on the paper tells you the acidity level.
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post #32 of 34 (permalink) Old 01-03-2005, 12:06 PM Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by Ridgemanron
Not talking about an additive. These are paper-like strips that you dip into the coolant for a second, just to let it react with the acid-level-squares on the paper. The color-change that ocurs on the paper tells you the acidity level.
P.S.- Many commercial and city run transit operations use them regularly.
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post #33 of 34 (permalink) Old 01-03-2005, 12:07 PM
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oh my god, stan.....
haha
i never knew it was that serious.....
i dont wanna take any chances, ill have it towed by flatbed and have that air changed out.
sounds like a job best left for professionals.
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post #34 of 34 (permalink) Old 01-03-2005, 12:42 PM
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Semi-serious advice: if you do have access to dry nitrogen, and track your car, use it in your tires. Second best would be dry air.

Worst is moist air (or air out of a compressor that doesn't have a line drier). The water vapor causes more extreme and less predictable tire pressure changes.

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