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1987 Turbo Esprit HCI
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Discussion Starter #1
I went to change the oil and the plug rounded over on me.
I've tried everything and just made a mess of it. I've got a new plug, but I still have to get the old one out.
I've come to the conclusion that I need to pull the pan and use heat to remove it. Maybe drilling. Does anyone know if the pan can be removed with the transmission and engine still in the car? I don't want to start a few hour job and it turn into a few day job without some warning.
Looking under it it seems like it will be tricky, but possible. But that's what I thought about the exhaust manifold. And that turned out to be impossible in the car.

Also, do these cars have oil pan gaskets, or were they just installed with RTV? Searching around I see stuff about elise's using RTV only.

Thanks for any input.
 

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I believe it can be done. There is a windage tray between the sump and the block that has a short vent tube sticking up, and you will have to work around the oil pickup tube that protrudes down into the deepest part of the sump. I use hylomar for the joint on reinstallation.
 
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S4s
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I would have tried using a Dremmel cutoff wheel to flatten 2 edges on the plug, and then using a soldering iron to heat it up. Maybe a torch if it is being really stubborn.
However, it is always good to get in the pan and check for any metal or sludge if you don't mind doing surgery. :)
 

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If you made that big a mess of it you have nothing to lose by trying to drill it out before you take the pan off. Drill a small hole to get the oil out and then enlarge it till you can remove what's left. If you can get the oil out then maybe you could use the torch.
David Teitelbaum
 

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I'm guessing you have exhausted all other routes, so yes it can, not that its a walk in the park, but what on the Esprit is? As mentioned above the windage tray and pick up strainer are what makes it a pain, I loosen the intake side engine mount, remove the exhaust side mount and anything that's too tight to allow you to lift the engine up enough to give you room to wiggle the oil pan to clear the pick up, you don't need a lot but every inch helps. If it helps any its not as bad, IMHO, as the exhaust manifold:rolleyes:
 

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Wingless Wonder
1988 Esprit Turbo
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I've removed the oil pan with the engine in the car. As usual, it is a putzy operation, as the pan is glued in with sealant. You have to make sure that all the old sealer is removed before reinstalling.

"While you are in there"... safety-wire the gauze filter together.


1260892
 
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1987 Turbo Esprit HCI
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Discussion Starter #7
I would have tried using a Dremmel cutoff wheel to flatten 2 edges on the plug, and then using a soldering iron to heat it up. Maybe a torch if it is being really stubborn.
However, it is always good to get in the pan and check for any metal or sludge if you don't mind doing surgery. :)
I tried those dumb gater sockets, bolt extractors, vice grips, slip joint pliers with a clamp on the handle putting tons of force on the bolt, I filed it down a size, I filed it down to two flats and tried an adjustable too. It's like it's made of silly putty it's so soft I hardly put pressure on it before it deforms.
I tried heating it up with a torch but with all that oil behind it I think it's too much to do.
I'll be interested to see how clean it is in there anyway.

If you made that big a mess of it you have nothing to lose by trying to drill it out before you take the pan off. Drill a small hole to get the oil out and then enlarge it till you can remove what's left. If you can get the oil out then maybe you could use the torch.
David Teitelbaum
I guess if I loosened the engine mounts first like esprit888 suggested I could raise it high enough to good face on access for that.
I was worried about leaving little bits of brass in the oilpan if I tried drilling. But if I drop it, it'll be a lot nicer taking down a drained oil pan, so I think that's not a bad idea.

"While you are in there"... safety-wire the gauze filter together.
I didn't know this was a concern. But an easy to address one while it's accessible. Thanks for the tip.
 

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Wingless Wonder
1988 Esprit Turbo
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I used Permatex Ultra Grey on the oil pan...5 years later, no leaks. :p <<<JINX>>>?

1260933
 

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1987 Turbo Esprit HCI
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Discussion Starter #10
Actually that pan drops pretty easily. I was worried with those two frame tubes there was going to be a crunch on space, but not bad at all.
I ended up using an oil pump to suck the oil out of the pan through the turbo drain hole.
With some good heat front and back the plug finally came out.

My next questions are.
Does the turbo oil return line get an oring? Mine didn't have one, but the pan looks like it's made to take one.
Also, when dropping the pan, a ~1/2"- 5/8" oring jumped at me from near the dip stick tube. It's hard as a rock and broken in half, but I can't figure out where it came from. Any one know it's size and where it goes?

Not directly related to the oil pan,
When dropping the belly pan the rear passenger side nutsert broke out of the body. It was already missing 4 more, but in less critical locations.
Is there a good way to replace them? I was thinking I could fiber glass over the hole, then drill a new hole and epoxy in a new nutsert and crunch it while the epoxy is still wet.
I found some 6x1.0 nutserts locally the other day. I don't have an end for my riveter that fits those, but I figure I could use the bolt and nut method.
 

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1987 Turbo Esprit HCI
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Discussion Starter #11
On page 40 of section EA it says
"On 912 engines check that the O ring is fitted over the dipstick tube inside the main bearing housing."
I thought these were 910's. But I guess that's where the mystery oring goes.
It looks like it's p/n A912E6398F. I can't find any specs online for the oring though.
 

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You can get the "proper" jacknut (looks kind of like a toggle bolt but actually has 3 legs) over at Mr G's Hardware. Use a bit of Never Seize. What happens is the protion of the threaded fastener that extends out past the nut part of the jacknut gets rusty. As you undo and try to force the fastener out the rusty portion seizes up and you wind up spinning the jacknut.
David Teitelbaum
 
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