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As the title suggests can owners of the 2020 illuminate the issues they've dealt with thus far? Mileage would be nice data as well.
 

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I'm currently dealing with Lotus not being able to figure out where my Evora GT is leaking coolant, as well not being able to figure out an electrical issue plus a strong electrical burn smell. I'm sitting at about 1k miles on there and the car has been in the shop almost 30 days now.
 

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I have a 2018 400, but it's the same car overall... dash rattles, bolt fell out and rattling in the headliner against the rollbar, paint rubbing off the door handle from being misaligned from factory... rear diffuser cracked at bolt hole due to over tightening at the factory, seatbelt B pillar plastic cover cracked on delivery... a couple interior threads cross threaded at factory discovered when I upgraded the stereo speakers... almost all reasons why 'hand built' is no longer a thing for most auto companies... 3k miles...
 

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Only 2 months of ownership and just completed 1K service - no issues whatsoever. So far.....
 

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None. Car has been solid and prior to the 1K service went thru interior and exterior to look for anything that had to be addressed. Nothing to report. Will keep an eye on what a few have reported.
 

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The tech just got back from training in the UK and mentioned that Lotus was looking at the design of the coolant reservoir on the GT. Made it sound like they're anticipating issues.
 

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The folks with teething problems - could you please post the build plaque of your car? i.e., who built it from the passenger dash area. Just out of curiosity.

I am on my second 400, both built/assembled by different individuals and one was a total lemon while other is solid so far.
 

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I have often wondered if cars built by certain build teams (led by the individuals named on the plaque) had better outcomes than others. You would think Lotus captures this type of info and would act on it but probably wouldn't have time to do much about it in the short term (given the need to capture lots of data over a year or two first and this being already past the full run of cars built). I have been very happy with the quality of build on my car overall at 11,600 miles. My A/C compressor wasn't working at delivery (manufacturing issue?) but otherwise just a minor initial nit or two (loose interior door panel) and once fixed everything has been great since. My plaque has David Hills noted.
 

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I have often wondered if cars built by certain build teams (led by the individuals named on the plaque) had better outcomes than others. You would think Lotus captures this type of info and would act on it but probably wouldn't have time to do much about it in the short term (given the need to capture lots of data over a year or two first and this being already past the full run of cars built). I have been very happy with the quality of build on my car overall at 11,600 miles. My A/C compressor wasn't working at delivery (manufacturing issue?) but otherwise just a minor initial nit or two (loose interior door panel) and once fixed everything has been great since. My plaque has David Hills noted.
Build quality history would be ongoing since the 400 came out in 2015 (2016 USA). There is nothing special about the GT other than the fitment of a different rear bumper that has also been standard for teh ROW for last few years. As to the dash plaque signatures, I thought that was random names from the "team" and as the cars are built on an assembly line, all workers are team members.
 

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Build quality history would be ongoing since the 400 came out in 2015 (2016 USA). There is nothing special about the GT other than the fitment of a different rear bumper that has also been standard for teh ROW for last few years. As to the dash plaque signatures, I thought that was random names from the "team" and as the cars are built on an assembly line, all workers are team members.
Yeah its not 1 guy that builds the entire car. And the quality depends on how hungover he is! They just throw some random employees name on there.
This article mentions it. Witnessing How Lotus Builds Every Evora Almost Entirely by Hand

Edit: They would almost definitely track each assembly step/process with a signoff of that technician (though from my experience they probably sign off each others work or sign everything off they forgot at the end of the build). So Im sure they would be following issues back to those people to see what they were doing differently.

To be fair though, most Lotus issues are engineering/design problems not assembly. For the most part everything is bolted in the right place, if it doesnt work its not really their fault.
 

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Owned my 400 since June 2017 (bought new). Almost 10k miles now. Only had one issue where the seal at the top of the driver's side A-pillar came loose. Was fixed under warranty.

As far as problems, its problem been one of least problematic cars I have ever owned. :: knock on wood..errr...composite ::
 

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The tech just got back from training in the UK and mentioned that Lotus was looking at the design of the coolant reservoir on the GT. Made it sound like they're anticipating issues.
I had the charge cooler reservoir tank replaced on my 2017 400, leak was from where the cap mates with the top of the tank. According to my dealer not a rare thing... Looking at several 2020 GTs a couple had aerospace quality billet / welded ali tanks whereas some (including Dec 2019 builds) had my style plastic tanks.
 

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I had the charge cooler reservoir tank replaced on my 2017 400, leak was from where the cap mates with the top of the tank. According to my dealer not a rare thing... Looking at several 2020 GTs a couple had aerospace quality billet / welded ali tanks whereas some (including Dec 2019 builds) had my style plastic tanks.
Ditto. Same happened to me. Took 3 weeks to get replacement part from England.
 

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Picked up my GT in November from Autosport Designs on Long Island. Had a beautiful 2 day drive back to Virginia and zero issues since...only at 500 miles, but the build quality seems better than the 2017 and 2018 400s I test drove earlier. Rock solid, absolutely love it!
 

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Lotus finally got back to me - faulty battery from the factory is the cause of the electrical burn smell. Additionally, the oil pan wasn't fully secured so oil was leaking/burning on the exhaust. They never found anything that indicated the coolant "actually" leaked so they're now assuming it was never properly filled in the first place.
 

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Lotus finally got back to me - faulty battery from the factory is the cause of the electrical burn smell. Additionally, the oil pan wasn't fully secured so oil was leaking/burning on the exhaust. They never found anything that indicated the coolant "actually" leaked so they're now assuming it was never properly filled in the first place.
#lotusquality
 

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I wrote a blog post for my friends regarding my 2018 400. Evora issues

Allow me to get right to the point. I have ZERO expectations of a trouble-free ownership experience. Like my old college roommate used to say, “low expectations, low chance of disappointment.” So why did I set the bar so low? Years ago, I used to work for a Lotus franchise during the launch of the Evora, and I did events for Lotus corporate, and I’ve seen how the sausage is made, so to speak.

My Evora 400 sat unsold for two years before I took delivery of it, and within the first month of ownership I’ve noticed the following issues:

  • Panel gaps are comical, especially on the heinously expensive carbon fiber trunk hatch. Lane can attest that the carbon work is great, aside from the fitment.
  • Airbag light was on. This was fixed by rerouting the passenger side impact airbag harness and cleaning the connectors.
  • Drivers side headlight moves around. The bouncing light pattern at night reminds me of my old MkII GTI.
  • The trunk hatch wouldn’t release. You’d hear the actuator fire, but the hatch wouldn’t open. It was out of alignment from the factory.
  • You have to press and hold the start button to get it to turn on. I’m used to modern cars where one quick press will make the car turn on. One morning I pressed it and released it immediately, and it stopped cranking. Fixing my mistake, I pressed and held it, and it cranked for 5 seconds before I gave up, locked the car, unlocked it and tried again. It did finally start.
  • The plaque on the dash stating “Hand Built in England by Carl Knights” is crooked.
  • Metal grates to the side of the rear hatch don’t match and have quite uneven gaps. They might have been made in Bryan’s louver shop.
Yet I do not care. About any of it.

Why? Because none of that detracts from the positively thrilling driving experience. I could complain about the head unit that looks like the last item Circuit City sold before going under, the jet ski gauges, the parking brake that sounds like a collapsing Erector Set, but it all doesn’t matter.

We all know modern cars are mostly boring. We can wax poetic about slow car fast, RADwood era cars being more fun to drive than isolated modern cars, and with a few exceptions, we’d all be right. This car is one of the exceptions. 981 Caymans? I love them. They’re fantastic instruments of speed, but you really have to hustle one on a back road before it’s fun. The Evora will happily jam along at that pace, but you don’t have to be at full tilt before it’s entertaining and rewarding.

Even my Chevy SS, a car that is universally praised for being fun to drive, has to be driven really hard before it’s rewarding. Up until that point you’re just covering ground fast, and you feel like you’re along for the ride rather than the one making it happen. The magic carpet mag ride is smoothing it out. The steering is accurate but it’s devoid of nuanced feedback. Road conditions that fluster an 80’s car are things that I’m blissfully unaware of, but expertly handling your car through those conditions is what makes driving fun.

Drive a quick but not blistering pace in the Evora, and the wheel is still alive in your hands. The car is wiggling and following the road. It washboards on power coming out of corners. You can just play with it. It’s not isolated, or numb, and everything you touch is thankfully full of feedback. Instead of being a modern sensory deprivation chamber with no sensation of speed, it just has that feeling of being alive that I love about older cars.

You can defeat the nannies, threshold brake without triggering ABS, slide it into the apex on the brakes without anything freaking out. The car just lets you drive. It feels organic, dare I say old fashioned, and it’s super rewarding. You don’t have to put the screws to it before it’s fun, yet when you do, it’s an experience that makes you feel like a hero for being the one in the hot seat who is doing the work, not the car. A GT-R or MP4-12C can carry an insane pace on the roads we love, but you don’t feel like you drove that pace; the car did it all for you.

Since I love the driving experience so much, I just can’t get worked up with the flaws. Unless you get something properly exotic, you aren’t going to have the kind of enjoyment that the Evora delivers at that price point.

Finally, let’s be honest and fair too. I’m cheating. I won’t own it out of warranty, since I know better. It’s my second car, and I think of it like a toy. Any future inconveniences will be more bullet points to add to a list of things that have made me laugh and shrug while I enjoy the ride.
 
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