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00 MRS - 2ZZ NA
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's another helpful flywheel weight list that you guys don't have to spend years compiling the information for:

http://www.newcelica.org/forums/showthread.php?t=70710&highlight=flywheel

aerospike2002 said:
Ok, I think that I may speak for many of us when I say how tired I am of doing a billion searches looking for flywheel weights. I'm just about to do a flywheel change and figured that in all the time I wasted doing searches on individual weights, I would just compile all the results I found for GTS flywheel weights. These are the results that everyone seems to agree on the most, but I realize (in fact I'm pretty sure) that I may be wrong on one or two of these. In that case, I would greatly appreciate if you could correct me nicely (hehe...) so I could update this. Also, I feel that this compilation may be so useful to those looking to upgrade their flywheels that it should be "Hot Topiced"....but maybe I'm just being biased! Anyways, take a look at this, and like I said, correct me please.

~Stock GTS (chromoly) - 13.0 lbs.

~Gripforce (chromoly) - 11.0 lbs.
~Blitz Active Clutch (chromoly) - 10.5 lbs.
~MWR (forged chromoly) - 10.5 lbs. (GTS)
~Toda (chromoly) - 10.3617 lbs.
~MWR (forged chromoly) - 10.2 lbs. (GT)
~C-One Standard (chromoly) - 9.9208 lbs.
~JUN (chromoly) - 9.6998 lbs.
~TRD Japan Flywheel (chromoly) - 9.6 lbs.
~RPS Cyn-R-G Segmented (aluminum) - 9.5 lbs.
~C-One Type-R (chromoly) - 8.8 lbs.
~TOM's (chromoly) - 8.03 lbs.
~AASCO (aluminum) - 8.0 lbs.
~Mueller (aluminum) - 8.0 lbs.
~Unorthodox (aluminum) - 8.0 lbs.
~Fidanza (aluminum) - 7.5 lbs.


*OTHER - Weight Unknown*

~AASCO (6061 T6 aluminum)



So there you have it. I think I got them all. If there is one that's not on here, let me know. I'll update it. :cool:
Enjoy.

If I don't get any car sponserships or opt not to go on the nicely packaged Southbend Clutch + Fidanza flywheel combo...I'll be going for the TOM's flywheel due to it being chromoly. That way, it'll be stronger and I don't have to worry about resurfacing it anytime soon like the Fidanza, even though Smaay's 545 whp GTS is running it and still holding strong.
 
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00 MRS - 2ZZ NA
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
111 views and one person thinks this is good info...wow. Your welcome man.
 

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So how long do the aluminum wheels last? They have to be resurfaced?

I was wondering if flywheels come balanced? Does resurfacing them includes balancing?
 

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00 MRS - 2ZZ NA
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Here's the Fidanza flywheel info:



Aluminum body, steel friction surface. Fidanza aluminum flywheels are milled from high-quality 6061 T-6 aluminum, for light weight with high strength and high-heat dissipation. The friction surface is 1050 high-carbon steel, secured with military-grade fasteners, and can work with any type of clutch material, including Kevlar, ceramic, sintered metal, and organic. The heat-treated ring gears are also 1050 steel, and are shrink-fitted and secured with Grade 8 button screws. These flywheels are SFI-approved.

notes Make TOYOTA Engine Type L4 Liter 1.8 Engine Size 1.8L/1795cc Beginning Year 2000 Ending Year 2002 Engine Family Toyota 4-cylinder Flywheel Material: Aluminum Weight: 7.5 lbs. Replaceable Friction Surface: Yes Safety Rating: SFI 1.1 Quantity: Sold individually.

Flywheel, Aluminum, 7.5 lb., Toyota, 1.8L, L4, Each

Our aluminum flywheels are made from the highest quality 6061 T6 aluminum. The material is fantastic for strength, heat dissipation and of course reduction in weight. The friction surface we use is an icredibly strong 1045 steel. The flywheel friction plates are milled to meet our high specifications. A Fidanza aluminum flywheel can mate with any type of clutch material, including organic, kevlar, ceramic, metallic and sintered iron. We attach the replaceable friction surface with military grade aerospace fasteners. With these replaceable friction plates there is no need to replace the entire flywheel when the clutch or flywheel is at the end of it's life, saving time and money. The ring gears we use are also made from 1050 steel and are heat treated for durability. The flywheel ring gears are heated then pressed on and secured with grade 8 button screws. We were the first to utilize a stepped dowel system in most of our flywheel applications. This doweling method ensures that once the pressure plate is installed the dowels cannot be removed because they become locked into place. No chromemoly can compete with the awesome serviceablity, strength and superior design of Fidanza's aluminum flywheels. If there was a better material out there, we would be using it.
It can't be resurfaced, a center section has to be replaced ( http://www.newcelica.org/forums/showthread.php?t=254646 ) :

Boosted2.0 said:
MWR and Southbend both sell the replaceable center section for a very low price. No, it cannot be resurfaced - the plate must be replaced.

You will need an inch pounds torque wrench to do the replacement.
Southbend is a nice clutch company BTW. They have clutch + fidanza flywheel packages I might pick up. And here's boosted's response as to why it isn't a good idea to go chromoly:

Boosted2.0 said:
GTsRasta said:
Would it be worth it to go with a chromoly flywheel then? Do those have to be taken out and repaired in any way, like the 8.03 lb TOMs?
No - they still have to be refinished between uses and have a finite life expectancy. The Fidanza you can just keep changing the face on
I hope this helps. I guess I'll be going on the southbend + fidanza flywheel route. http://www.dxdracingclutches.com/home.html
 

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purveyor of lightness
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How coincidental... I replaced the stock clutch/flywheel last week and just weighed my stock components this morning:

Stock components
Pressure plate: 8.702 lbs.
Flywheel: 13.304 lbs.
Clutch disk: 1.863 lbs.*
Total: 23.869 lbs.

Upgraded components (Fidanza aluminum flywheel / ACT XT-SS clutch)
Pressure plate: 8.285 lbs.
Flywheel: 7.865 lbs.
Clutch disk: 2.510 lbs.
Total: 18.660 lbs.

Total savings of 5.209 lbs. and it revs OH-SO-NICE!

*It would have been a bit more if the disk wasn't worn all the way down to the rivets...
 

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How coincidental... I replaced the stock clutch/flywheel last week ...
YOU did or someone you know did? :) I ask because I've had the Fidanza fw sitting in my garage for months and haven't had the balls to install it yet. I changed the clutch and flywheel in my ex-350Z but that was easy. Tranny comes off, unbolt old, bolt new, tranny on. But I'll need to take off one or both hubs on the Elise, which means the brakes and everything, then the CV joints, etc. :crazyeyes
 

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Ok, this may sound ridiculous, but have you gotten a before/after dino?

I would think that 5 lbs of drive train weight loss would show a difference in HP. I think it would add HP more than adding a ram air thing.
 

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111 views and one person thinks this is good info...wow. Your welcome man.

I thought it was good information but did not feel the need to post. I am glad to find out the stock flywheel is 13lbs and see no reason to change for street driving.

I am sure not a lot of people are considering a new flywheel. They either do not see the benefit or realise the stock one is pretty decent. At 13lbs, we are not lugging around lead slugs here. That is lighter than some aftermarket flywheels for larger cars.
 

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Ok, this may sound ridiculous, but have you gotten a before/after dino?

I would think that 5 lbs of drive train weight loss would show a difference in HP. I think it would add HP more than adding a ram air thing.
Flywheels do not make hp. They just make it easier to transfer the power. My personal experience with them is that they make the car quicker in the first 3 gears and show little gain in higher gears. They make a much larger difference if you have a really heavy flywheel, which we don't.
 

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Lighter weight and reduced friction parts DO make more HP....not trying to flame you but...

In this case a lighter and better constructed flywheel / clutch would help to reduce HP loss to the wheels. Less power would be wasted trying to move heavier parts. The parts also might not have as much friction too...If you were taking dynos to the wheels...not off engine crank...you might see a difference. Therefore you would be making HP with better / lighter parts TO THE WHEELS.

Your stating the car might be quicker for the first three gears...a dyno might show more power being applied to the wheels?
 

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Murix, Dmbrown,

I think you guys are saying the same thing and are just arguing semantics. Dmbrown is right from the verbage "doesn't make more HP." Assuming no internals are changed (the clutch/flywheel are not engine internals), the engine will only make x amount of power. That is a constant value. Between the crank and the wheels, a certain percentage of power is lost from acceleration of mass, friction and heat. Any reduction in those and the wheels will see "more power." However, there isn't any increase in available power from the engine, only an increase in available power at the wheels.
 

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Dmbrown34 said:
Ok, this may sound ridiculous, but have you gotten a before/after dino? I would think that 5 lbs of drive train weight loss would show a difference in HP. I think it would add HP more than adding a ram air thing.
Car is getting dynoed on Friday morning...

Unfortunately the gains from my previous best 177.17 whp/126.04 wtor to whatever I pull on the rollers in 43 hours will be an amalgamation of the following:

a) Katana 8.5 psi supercharger with Charlie's wonderous "cam on demand" ECU flash
b) Flywheel/Clutch change
c) Deinstallation of TurboXS intake and Reinstallation of stock airbox/Green filter (to fix bad high cam lean condition under boost).
d) New NGK Iridium spark plugs

I do recall that I gained 4whp across the board on my N/A B18C5 Honda back in the 90's with a 6lb. lighter flywheel.

My goal is 225whp - 230whp and 150wtor... we'll see!

Conan said:
YOU did or someone you know did? I ask because I've had the Fidanza fw sitting in my garage for months and haven't had the balls to install it yet.
I was like that too - had the flywheel/clutch on my shelf since last October... I found a very experienced local guy who did the clutch/flywheel job for $600. Killer deal. TurboPhil and I did the Katana install ourselves in 6 hours though.

Best thing is that my net weight increase from installing (a) through (d) resulted in a mere 7 lb. weight gain. Should be near zero if I decide to lose the charcoal emissions system. Charlie's already removed the codes. :evil:
 

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Hows the driving with flywheel? Alot of poeple complain of the "twitchyness" of the lighter rotating assembly, but I figure with how light we are we should not be as suspectable to that.

Things like coming from a complete stop to lifting the foot off the gas. Does the car buck more as the engine is more willing to change speed?
 

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Hows the driving with flywheel? Alot of poeple complain of the "twitchyness" of the lighter rotating assembly, but I figure with how light we are we should not be as suspectable to that.

Things like coming from a complete stop to lifting the foot off the gas. Does the car buck more as the engine is more willing to change speed?
A tiny bit. It's also requires a tiny bit of adjustment taking off from a stop. But I'm speaking about almost imperceptable differences, really.

It's most notable when rev-matching a downshift - the engine feels much more zippy getting up to the target RPM. It really makes the Evo's throttle response, in the same conditions, feel like a rented U-Haul.

btw - the aluminum AASCO flywheel also has a steel surface and is available so it can be run with a multi-plate clutch.

YOU did or someone you know did? :) I ask because I've had the Fidanza fw sitting in my garage for months and haven't had the balls to install it yet. I changed the clutch and flywheel in my ex-350Z but that was easy. Tranny comes off, unbolt old, bolt new, tranny on. But I'll need to take off one or both hubs on the Elise, which means the brakes and everything, then the CV joints, etc. :crazyeyes
Actually, the last car I saw with the gearbox removed had the lower A-arms, complete with hubs (unbolted from at the camber adjustment) sitting next to the lift. It appeared that it was: remove wheels, tie off calipers, remove lower A-arms w/ hubs, pull shafts, deal with gearbox. I'm told the gearbox is a bit fiddly to get past the rear subframe crossmember with the engine in situ.

You're more than welcome to come put one in the Evo though - I've absolutely no desire to deal with that amount of drivetrain silliness!
 

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Lighter weight and reduced friction parts DO make more HP....not trying to flame you but...

In this case a lighter and better constructed flywheel / clutch would help to reduce HP loss to the wheels. Less power would be wasted trying to move heavier parts. The parts also might not have as much friction too...If you were taking dynos to the wheels...not off engine crank...you might see a difference. Therefore you would be making HP with better / lighter parts TO THE WHEELS.

Your stating the car might be quicker for the first three gears...a dyno might show more power being applied to the wheels?
A lighter flywheel does not make more power. It simply allows the available power to be used accelerating the vehicle quicker. This is no different than using lighter wheels.

I don't know much about how dynos work, but I know this: Real power measurement should be at a certain rpm, full throttle, with a load applied such that the engine can merely maintain its rpm. The load required will then tell you the torque of the engine at that rpm. Any system that tells you the torque by measuring acceleration is only a mathmatical interpretation. Such a system will report more power because the car with a lighter flywheel (or wheels) can accelerate the drum quicker. Doesn't mean it's actually producing more torque.

Nobody goes around saying their car makes more horsepower because of their lighter wheels.

xtn
 

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A lighter flywheel does not make more power. It simply allows the available power to be used accelerating the vehicle quicker. This is no different than using lighter wheels.

I don't know much about how dynos work, but I know this: Real power measurement should be at a certain rpm, full throttle, with a load applied such that the engine can merely maintain its rpm. The load required will then tell you the torque of the engine at that rpm. Any system that tells you the torque by measuring acceleration is only a mathmatical interpretation. Such a system will report more power because the car with a lighter flywheel (or wheels) can accelerate the drum quicker. Doesn't mean it's actually producing more torque.

Nobody goes around saying their car makes more horsepower because of their lighter wheels.

xtn

Correct.

It is also a trade off. While quicker revs are at hand, some ease of driveability and smoothness can be lost. Results of course vary on different cars and different flywheels, but this holds true to some degree. Every car I have had has had one. The Elise drives so smooth stock I am loathe to change it.
 

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Great info. Thanks!
 
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