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Some years back I worked on Artie Baldwin's old '89 non-SE that he had converted to an SE. One of the things he did was move the oil cooler to the rear of the car, low attached to the frame, just to the right of the muffler. It was not the stock oil cooler but a smaller one and he added two Spal fans which ran continuously if the engine was running. We ended up selling the car pretty quickly after we got it up and running (Artie had continuously blown head gaskets due to some pretty bad work by a shop that he had used to do an engine rebuild). I often wondered about relocating the oil cooler aft and using fans in order to either free up space forward of the radiator assembly or to take some heat load off both the AC condenser and the radiator. Plus in my case if I wanted to add an intercooler to my car (it's an '89 non-SE) I would need to find a space for the intercooler water circuitry much as Artie attempted. Anybody out there ever moved to oil cooler to a rear position and relied on fan-driven air flow? Any data on how well that worked out?
 

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I have no idea of how much heat dissipates through the oil cooler up front.
But could an oil to cooling water heat exchanger be an option.
Considering that my self, or the AC condenser that have to go!
 

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When I was changing mine to SE spec I was trying to figure out what to do with the oil cooler. I didn't want it dumping heat right in front of the Chargecooler radiator and engine radiator. Then I noticed the little oil cooler on my Audi A8. So I got an engine oil cooler, sandwich type, for an audi V6 2.8 and a remote oil filter assembly. It doesn't try to cool all the oil, looks like 50% or less if I recall. Works wonderfully! I don't track the car but the engine temps never get much past 82 degrees C if at all even when it's hot out and, added benefit, the oil is sooooo much easier and less messy to change. I can dig out the receipts and take pics if you are interested.
 

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Some years back I worked on Artie Baldwin's old '89 non-SE that he had converted to an SE. One of the things he did was move the oil cooler to the rear of the car, low attached to the frame, just to the right of the muffler. It was not the stock oil cooler but a smaller one and he added two Spal fans which ran continuously if the engine was running. We ended up selling the car pretty quickly after we got it up and running (Artie had continuously blown head gaskets due to some pretty bad work by a shop that he had used to do an engine rebuild). I often wondered about relocating the oil cooler aft and using fans in order to either free up space forward of the radiator assembly or to take some heat load off both the AC condenser and the radiator. Plus in my case if I wanted to add an intercooler to my car (it's an '89 non-SE) I would need to find a space for the intercooler water circuitry much as Artie attempted. Anybody out there ever moved to oil cooler to a rear position and relied on fan-driven air flow? Any data on how well that worked out?

89 cars and all previous MY have one centrally located oil cooler.
On my 88 Car, I mocked up two smaller coolers in space available in front of the frt wheels. This location gives a better cold air flow than @rear.
Coolers are CX racing 8 row + 5.5" SPALS
.
 

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Dreaded Prior Owner
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Discussion Starter #46
Did you ever get that knocking sensor connected and functioning?
Connected and functioning, yes. Tuned properly, who knows?

Given that the Megasquirt is a universal standalone ECU, it gives you lots of options to set up (or mess up) knock control, and it's up to you, the manual and the forum gurus to make sense of it. Basically you can select a resonant frequency determined by the cylinder bore, then chart a baseline of allowable normal noise, then tell the thing how fast to pull timing and how fast to add it back in. Beyond that you can monitor noise by cylinder or tell it to listen at particular times in the combustion cycle etc,etc.

On my setups it's pretty obvious in the datalogs when you get noise spikes, and the ECU pulls timing promptly, but I have no doubt there's room for improvement in my settings.
 

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I did the same thing with the knock sensor, works fine. The one thing I didn't think of with it until it didn't work was it's a single wire sensor. It depends on being screwed into the boss on the block for a ground. Epoxy is an insulator, so no ground...duhh. I had to run a separate ground wire.
 

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Years ago I worked with large diesel and gas engines at power plants.
During commissioning we calibrated each knocking sensor. One at each cylinder head.
These were Bosch sensors. If one is replaced, it had to be calibrated again.
Thats why I asked how you did it with MS. Guess that the right way is to listen for knocking on a dyno, and set the values accordingly.
 

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Dreaded Prior Owner
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Discussion Starter #49
Replaced my (very) old PLX wideband controller with an AEM X-series WB O2. Allegedly much quicker response and uses the newer Bosch 4.9LSU sensor. I'm not wild about the extra LEDs, I'd prefer an analog gauge, but am hoping the quicker response will help with tuning accel enrichment, and maybe make the feedback for the fuel auto-tune more relevant.
 

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why do you have a standalone with the MS? i think i sent you my file with knock settings? I tweaked what the tuner set by changing the frequency until i saw the largest spikes at start where the stock ECU would give some counts. if you do that and find a value that is most sensitive, then change your lower rpm threashold to 2500 or 3k so you dont get false activations. the AEM Infinity allows almost infinite tuning with table size, individual gains for whatever rpms you populate in the cells, etc. since start records some knock events, i increased the trigger threshold at lower rpms and decreased it at higher rpms where knock will actually occur. hope that helps
 

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Dreaded Prior Owner
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Discussion Starter #51
why do you have a standalone with the MS?
The MS3 does not have an internal UEGO controller, just a scalable input
i think i sent you my file with knock settings?
You may have, but if so it slipped through my steel sieve memory, so please re-send
I see lots of random noise at start/rough idle/stall type conditions, but the normal noise signal ramps up fairly steadily as RPMs increase, and I can just set a limit curve above it. Spikes under boosted load show pretty well, but the lower rpm/high load stuff sometimes sneaks by my settings. A work in progress...
 

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ok sent
i can certainly advance the timing under boost and see the signal increase. I can then adjust the signal frequency and see what effect it has on the signal strength to find the optimum frequency. I did that and then applied some trims very similar to the stock trims and saw a major reduction of knock signal at high boost.
so the interesting thing is the tuner's settings were very course compared to my tweaked settings and he was adamant that there was no knock on the dyno.
i have plans to re-dyno this year after some more changes
i forgot you used the MS3 and not the Pro

the graphs align vertically so you can see RPM, MAP, timing etc. The tuner set the threshold at .40. you can see on the left that i was able to lower them after applying protection trims. Idle signal is .03; the max on this log is .08
 

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Dreaded Prior Owner
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Discussion Starter #53
Finally got rid of my Federal air pump drive at the exhaust cam. The cam end float washer has a larger ID than the ROW one, so I made a little stepped bush to allow it to be bolted on. With a new cap from JAE, there's no more hole in the heat shield!
 

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