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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Some interesting stuff about the Elise and what it took to bring it to North America… Items shown in [ ] are my comments...

-What contributes to the weight difference between the Euro spec Elise S2 at 1830 lbs vs the Fed Elise at 1973 lbs (both weights are with fuel and other fluids:
*airbags and dash vents/trim: 11 lbs
*additional parts such as sun visors, side markers: 2 lbs
*Engine and tranny: 70 lbs
*A/C system: 29 lbs
*Twin oil coolers: 13 lbs
*Additional fluids (oil and coolant): 7 lbs
*ABS and servo: 11 lbs.
Total: 143 lbs

-New to the Fed Elise is the composite energy-absorbing front crash structure and allows the Elise to meet all US crash standards.

-The body is made from closed-mold composite material that is thinner and lighter than the earlier hand laid fiber glass bodies.

-The exhaust is 5.5 lbs lighter than the Euro S2 version

-Spring rates are front S2 35 Fed standard 43 Fed Sport 48
rear S2 50 Fed standard 60 Fed Sport 65

-Drivers side airbag is the most compact available on any production car

-Over 500,000 miles of road testing were done including in the Artic Circle, Nevada deserts and high altitude in Colorado. Nearly half of the durability testing was done at 150 mph.

-The rear galvanized subframe is new to the Fed Elise and is smaller and lighter than the subframe used in the S2.

-Suspension changes include the 20% higher spring rates, revalved dampers (due to American concrete slab roads), altered rear suspension geometry and revised anti-dive/anti-squat geometry.

-Lotus “We can’t use of the shelf tire because they just generate sufficient contact pressure” thus the unique construction and compound for the Yokohama tire specific to the Elise. [Might want to beware of changing out tires on the Elise] .

Supplier of the various components used on the Fed Elise
*Front Aluminum Caliper Brakes: AP Racing
*Rear Brakes: Brembo
*Coils: Eibach
*Dampers: Bilstein
*Chassis: Hydro Aluminum Automotive Structures
*Alloys: Rimstock
*Instrumentation: Shurlock
*Steering wheel: Momo
*Airbags: Siemens
*ABS Brakes: TRW
*Body Panels: Sotira of France
*Subframe & suspension components: Lotus Fabrication
*Engine/Transmission: Toyota

-The 6 spd tranny was spec’d with the closest ratio gearset available from Toyota

-Fed Elise hood mounted radiator exit is modified to increase area by 17% and thus maintain cooling on par to Euro Elise even though engine has a higher output rating.

-8 engineers worked on the engine management set up (aka ECU) and uses 32 bit EMS software. There is a CAN based link between the ECU and the instrument cluster. [This might be the reason for the flickering shift light since CAN setups can cause some “cross talk”].

-Lotus tuned the ABS system by using special algorithms that control the ABS cut in points thus they eliminated the take away the enthusiast driving the car. Lotus “I can beat and ABS system are sadly behind the times. It’s not possible any longer [with the new Elise]…”

[What I have read about the Elise and know from driving one now for over a month is that indeed the 10 man Lotus development team did their home work and in 16 months brought this fine car to fruition. Also I am convinced that doing after market changes to this car needs to be done with extreme intelligence and caution.]

Michael
 

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YELOTUS said:
Also I am convinced that doing after market changes to this car needs to be done is extreme intelligence and caution.]

Michael
Ding...I'm amazed at how easily some people dismiss factory hardware and design. Now, changing things around is understandable on some 'normal' cars where economy/price limit the options. However, on thoroughbreds (and the only one I have experience with are Ducaties until my Elise gets here) it's should be done with a very strong dose of salt. It's one thing to individualize, but totally another to....
 

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some comments

The AC system was added a few years ago to meet Spanish and German market demands, but it still makes you wonder why AC isn't an option instead of standard.

The engine and transmission are obviously necessary to meet emissions requirements. What is the resulting weight gain from the remaining parts?
 

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It's always fascinated me reading posts on this and other Forums detailing what fixes they will do after the car they've never driven
or seen arrives. Total dismisal sight unseen of Lotus engineering.

"Lotus screwed this up or that up and I, high school autoshop graduate Frank from Des Moines am just the guy to make it right"

Absurd

Steve
 

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I believe the Fed spec suspension bushings are also different to that of the 111S to minimise longitudinal kick back of the control arms/hub/wheel assembly caused by the expansion joint design and slab sizes specific to US.
m
 

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FYI, the a/c offered on the cars this year is different from previous years where it was an option. It'a pretty compact unit, got to handle one at LOG, tried to walk off with it but Dave Simkin wouldnt let me!
Chris
 

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zvezdah1 said:
FYI, the a/c offered on the cars this year is different from previous years where it was an option. It'a pretty compact unit, got to handle one at LOG, tried to walk off with it but Dave Simkin wouldnt let me!
Chris
Note to self: If Chris ever comes over to the house, keep a close eye on the silverware.....;)
 

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Re: Re: A few hilites and observation about the Fed Elise>>>>

babak said:
Ding...I'm amazed at how easily some people dismiss factory hardware and design.
Keep in mind, the Lotus engineers have to live within a tight budget. The Elise is no Enzo. Otherwise the car would be sprinkled with much more CF, titanium, etc. Plus they must conform to certain federal requirements like noise, safety, emmisions, etc. These requirements create an envelope that constrict potential performance.

The aftermarket is not constrained as severely. This allows them to deliver solutions that are more focused and better performing.
 

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Great info YELOTUS-thanks!
After doing the factory tour and driver training-and seeing for myself how the test drivers flog the cars on the track and how much pride they all have in their product, I am confident that they have worked very hard to give us the best car they can. But I suppose cost is also a consideration. They wanted to bring the car here for $40000, and they are in business to make a profit, so they were not free to put any components into the car. So if we want to put a $3500 exhaust system on our car, it may be better than the one from the factory. We just have to make our changes carefully.
Now a Ferrari Enzo or Porsche Carrera GT-those would be hard to improve on-no expense spared on design, engineering, or components-go try and find a better exhaust system for those cars!
 
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