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Uh.... YIKES! :eek: The first questions is.... WHY? :rolleyes:

I wouldn't feel secure attaching myself to a structure (that keep me in flight) by six attachment points. That flat-out scares me. Besides, I'm sure the Elise's windscreen isn't rated for bird strikes either. I wouldn't want to encounter a flock of birds at 168 mph at 8,000 feet. And I have to think that landing would be really hard on the chassis and structure. I wonder how long the suspension will take that level of abuse?

Bob
 

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shay2nak
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This is cool! I'll have to buy one to make my commute 15 min instead of 1 hour each way! LOL! Thanks for the link!
 

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rtking said:
I wouldn't feel secure attaching myself to a structure (that keep me in flight) by six attachment points. That flat-out scares me.
I'm not sure thats really a problem. You'll be attaching directly to the chassis. If its good enough for a roll bar its _probably_ good enuf to lift from.

Besides, I'm sure the Elise's windscreen isn't rated for bird strikes either. I wouldn't want to encounter a flock of birds at 168 mph at 8,000 feet.
If it can take a deer at 60, it can probably take a bird at 160. Granted, it will crack, but I don't think you'll get hit.

And I have to think that landing would be really hard on the chassis and structure. I wonder how long the suspension will take that level of abuse?
Now this one does worry me. Most aircraft landing gear I've seen have a _lot_ more travel than an elise :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Bob, Just remember jet plane engines are held on with three bolts each! Yep, just three.
 

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James A said:
Bob, Just remember jet plane engines are held on with three bolts each! Yep, just three.
Since I work for a jet engine company i can add a littel to this! The engine thrust is take by two clevises at the front of the engine which each have one (large!) bolt in double shear. This bolt is also retained and fail safe, and with a large safety margin. Also at the front is a shear puck (about the size of a hockey puck) that takes the vertical and horizontal loads. At the rear the engine is suspended by two bolts. The rear is allowed to float back and forth to allow for thermal expansion.

I actually designed the mounts of the engine used on 747, 767, A310, A300 and MD-11. Gives me pause for thought every time I fly on one of these aircraft!

Probably more than you wanted to know :)
 

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God, you gotta love the internet. Where else can you discuss something arcane like jet engine mounting methods only to be corrected by the guy who actually designed them?
 

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ex-M3 said:
I actually designed the mounts of the engine used on 747, 767, A310, A300 and MD-11. Gives me pause for thought every time I fly on one of these aircraft!
Glad you didn't design the mounts for the 'ol DC-10...:eek:

I still don't like flying on 'em...

Tim Mullen - who's actually an Aerospace Engineer ...
 

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Now come on. How many engines actually fell off of DC-10s? I only remember that happening once. Now given that one up at O'hare ended up in a big fireball and early DC-10s had a problem with cargo doors blowing out and there was that one in Souix City...nevermind, I see why you wouldn't like flying on them.

Tom Sonza-Novera - also an Aerospace Engineer
 
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