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Hi guys, after saw a guy spun his car due to toe link snapped at the track, it pushed me over the edge to get the BOE 1/2 toe link upgrade. I just took my car for alignment a month ago. Do I need to do another alignment after install the BOE toe link kit?
 

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I do agree with Gabylon, but you can get really really close with doing what I did. Get a dial indicator and set it against the brake disc close to the edge on the horizontal line through the centre, and then zero it. Make sure it has plenty of travel in the compression stroke. Then go about changing out the toe arms, and in the end dial it in to zero on the indicator as you tighten the lock nuts, also make sure the heim joint is in the middle of its travel.
 

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Sorry, no pictures, but I clamped a straight edge to the disc and put a piece of tape on the front portion of the wheel well. With the straight edge ~1/16" away from the front of the wheel well, I put a mark on the tape.

Remove old link, replace with new, and adjust the toe to line up with the mark made previously.
 

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I think you gave me that idea. If you look at my picture, you can see the tape on the liner, I used that to make certain I was on the right revolution on the dial indicator. :grin2:
 

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That looks to me like the ball joint on the hub and the heim joint on the chassis were not timed so they were binding.
I may be wrong, but other than an impact, what else can cause that to break.
 

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I would like to see more detailed, higher resolution pictures of that failure, especially looking into the toe link. From that picture, it looks like the rod end was not threaded into the toe link very far.
 

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I would like to see more detailed, higher resolution pictures of that failure, especially looking into the toe link. From that picture, it looks like the rod end was not threaded into the toe link very far.
Agreed. Though looking at the BOE website images it doesnt look far off. They look about 2/3rds depth of the external taper Vs the failed one is 1/2.

Its 'interesting' that they taper those ends down so much and for such a long distance.

Really it should only reduce down as much as the flat faces (take the tips of the hex off). OR the length of the taper should be shorter than the depth of the thread.

Essentially they are saying that that part is as strong as the cross section at the end of the threaded fitting. Which looks like a 3mm tube.

Then it looks aluminium which gives you less headroom if your material quality/grade isnt consistent or checked.


Just my 2c worth
 

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Though looking at the BOE website images it doesnt look far off. They look about 2/3rds depth of the external taper Vs the failed one is 1/2.
The failed part is a Sector 111/Inokinetic toe link. My understanding, the BOE toe link is a swedged rod, threaded at the ends. The Inokinetic toe link is a solid hexagonal bar, drilled and threaded at the ends. The Inokinetic design has the possibility of having a machined in stress riser at the bottom of the drilled holes. The picture of the failure does not appear to have propagated from the bottom of the holes, but at the end of where the rod end was threaded into the holes. If you look at the installed pictures on Inokinetic's website, the rod end is threaded well into the bar.

It is difficult to make out in the picture of the failed toe link, but it looks bent at the point of failure, indicating something was bound up. Not a typical condition or expected on a radius rod/rod end setup.
 

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I sure would like to get to the bottom of whether or not that toe link failed before the wheel hit something sideways.
 

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I sure would like to get to the bottom of whether or not that toe link failed before the wheel hit something sideways.
either way, the toe link replacement (BOR, Inokinetic, etc) improves the existing setup significantly...
 

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Agreed. Anyone who considers using their Elise at the track should address what was described as the "trilogy of terror". The toe links was one of the three key items known for ruining a good day at the track.
One of the first things I did was replace the stock toe links with a BOE set (their beefiest). I took a more basic method on my replacement, I carefully measured my length, adjusted the length of the replacement units to match, put them on, drove it straight to a 4 wheel equipped alignment shop. I gave the shop the "standard lotus values" for alignment. I did not want extra toe-in which some track folks prefer (the Elise already goes through 2 sets of rear tires, for every 1 set of fronts).
 
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either way, the toe link replacement (BOR, Inokinetic, etc) improves the existing setup significantly...
I'm not so sure. In good condition and when fitted with a brace the OE setup is not so poor.
The biggest issue is binding which weakends the joint spigot (usually the inner) but this is not so common when they are in good condition and of high quality.

Recently we have seen more failures with uprated systems and if the rod is going to snap then you are not much better off, if at all, over OE as the captive nature of the bearings is lost.

This doesn't mean all aftermarket kits are the same of course.

:)
Gaz
 
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