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Its actually a motorcycle battery but don't think its any different than a car battery. Anyway, its about three years old and I have it hooked up to a battery tender for the winter. About three weeks ago I started my bike with no problem. Last week I tried to start it and the battery was too weak to crank over. I checked the voltage and it reads 13.2V but when I crank it, it only reads a little over 3V. It doesn't matter how long I charge it the outcome is the same. I also bump started my bike and the alternator was supposed to be charging it. Why is it not able to hold a charge? Did my battery tender damaged it? Its one of those sealed ones and I can't see the fluid level.
 

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Nah... it's a 2006 and the pre-merger Japan Storage (GS) batteries Yamaha was using were just OK. GS merged with Yuasa, so it might be a post-merger battery, but it's most likely just old and I'd bet money has a dry cell or two (it's not AGM if it's a GS - it just looks AGM). Keep an eye on it - the GS batteries had emergency vent holes in the tops with no hose and they were prone to start weeping acid once the batteries started going since Yamaha laid them on their sides. I've personally had two of them do it, both Yamaha OEMs

Most bike alternators barely put out enough to keep the bike going and put a charge into a good battery (some don't even put out enough, hence the 916's single low beam!). A bad battery can put enough load on the system to cause a reg./rect. to overheat and fry, although failures are more common with Ducatis and Hondas. You really don't want to use the alternator to try to bring one back from a low charge if you can avoid it.

I'd recommend just hitting the local sportbike supply shop and picking up whatever Yuasa fits it.

If it was a Deltran Battery Tender, I seriously doubt it fried the battery.
 

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Nah... it's a 2006 and the pre-merger Japan Storage (GS) batteries Yamaha was using were just OK. GS merged with Yuasa, so it might be a post-merger battery, but it's most likely just old and I'd bet money has a dry cell or two (it's not AGM if it's a GS - it just looks AGM). Keep an eye on it - the GS batteries had emergency vent holes in the tops with no hose and they were prone to start weeping acid once the batteries started going since Yamaha laid them on their sides. I've personally had two of them do it, both Yamaha OEMs

Most bike alternators barely put out enough to keep the bike going and put a charge into a good battery (some don't even put out enough, hence the 916's single low beam!). A bad battery can put enough load on the system to cause a reg./rect. to overheat and fry, although failures are more common with Ducatis and Hondas. You really don't want to use the alternator to try to bring one back from a low charge if you can avoid it.

I'd recommend just hitting the local sportbike supply shop and picking up whatever Yuasa fits it.

If it was a Deltran Battery Tender, I seriously doubt it fried the battery.
+1

2-3 years is about all the time flooded cell (sealed or not) motorcycle batteries will last. I usually count on replacing them every two years even though over the winter and I keep the batteries on maintainers.

If possible, try to see if a AGM battery (Odyssey and others) is available for your bike. They will last a lot longer and can not leak acid all over the frame.
 

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Yes, but the main reasons all batteries die, irrespective of the time, is sulfation. As the battery ages, the plates are essentially insulated with sulfate and can no longer sustain the chemical reaction. Certain conditions will make the sulfation process happen quicker. Sulfation to a battery is like heart disease, cholesterol, to a human, best way I can put it.
 
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