The Lotus Cars Community banner

Do you use Anti-seize on your sparkplugs when changing plugs?

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All. I'm a newbie to Lotus cars, but an oldie for cars (in general). Sparing the details, I know my way around an engine or 2.

Just bought an '05 N/A Elise w/40k miles. Bone stock from original owner that didn't "track" the car. I'm sure he drove it spiritedly, though. Find someone on here that hasn't, and I'll find you a liar amongst us.

I thought it'd be a good idea to change plugs, clean air filter, change oil, etc, and after checking what sparkplug and how people do this simple maintenance, I'm left with a question that isn't readily answered in the forum. Do y'all use anti-seize on the threads of the new plugs when you install? What 'flavor' do you use? The silver stuff that gets on even your dog if you even look at the bottle, or the copper stuff normally reserved for exhaust header bolts? Do you reduce the tightening torque as a result of using anti-seize?

Looking for responses on torque spec and what anti-seize (if any) is used on 2005 normally aspirated Elise.

Thanks in advance,
Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
I'm not one to ever recommend anti-seize on spark plugs, just a little motor oil on the threads.

I use NGK BKR7EIX Iridium plugs for supercharged 2zz. Gap 0.030.

Plugs tighten by hand and then to 13ft lbs. Coil pack tighten gently and then ~6ft lbs.
 

·
Registered
2017 Evora 400
Joined
·
1,240 Posts
I used the copper based stuff for a few decades. Now I use Logix Thread-Smart,
on everything. It's the Frank's hot sauce of thread protection. I don't use a torque wrench on spark plugs. Put them in, down to just contact, then go by feel, but I've been doing it a while. Most of the time when I screw something up, it's when I'm using a torque wrench.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 6TVRs+

·
Administrator
Joined
·
11,193 Posts
Absolutely not! With seven years of constantly changing plugs while in the motorcycle industry in the 70's when fouling plugs was an everyday occurance and thousands of plugs changed. Clean and Dry only. Check plug manufacturer sites as well and they all all tell you no lubricant's.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 06LE

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
I'm not one to ever recommend anti-seize on spark plugs, just a little motor oil on the threads.

I use NGK BKR7EIX Iridium plugs for supercharged 2zz. Gap 0.030.

Plugs tighten by hand and then to 13ft lbs. Coil pack tighten gently and then ~6ft lbs.
Hi All. I'm a newbie to Lotus cars, but an oldie for cars (in general). Sparing the details, I know my way around an engine or 2.

Just bought an '05 N/A Elise w/40k miles. Bone stock from original owner that didn't "track" the car. I'm sure he drove it spiritedly, though. Find someone on here that hasn't, and I'll find you a liar amongst us.

I thought it'd be a good idea to change plugs, clean air filter, change oil, etc, and after checking what sparkplug and how people do this simple maintenance, I'm left with a question that isn't readily answered in the forum. Do y'all use anti-seize on the threads of the new plugs when you install? What 'flavor' do you use? The silver stuff that gets on even your dog if you even look at the bottle, or the copper stuff normally reserved for exhaust header bolts? Do you reduce the tightening torque as a result of using anti-seize?

Looking for responses on torque spec and what anti-seize (if any) is used on 2005 normally aspirated Elise.

Thanks in advance,
Steve
Hi Steve,
I don't know the torque specs but
I always use a very small amount, starting at the bottom of the spark plug threads. I use my vinyl gloves to apply and then wipe off the excess with a paper towel. I use it on my modified twin turbo Z's spark plugs which I did track. Because I tracked it, I changed the plugs every other year, yes they were Iridium but under high boost & track conditions they would begin to misfire at full throttle.
Liquid Blue Cosmetics Fluid Paint
 

·
Registered
07 Aspen White Exige S - MT
Joined
·
2,690 Posts
Most plugs now come already with a anti seize property to them. I just opened a new pack of iridiums and they have a lubricant type goo on them.
Personally, I don’t lube mine at all. As @Catsailr27 said. If you lube them up it’s very easy to over torque them into the head. Most everyone I’ve ever seen install plugs torques them down WAYYY too tight, and adding lubricant to that is a strip waiting to happen
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
11,193 Posts

5 THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT SPARK PLUGS

1. Anti-seize
NGK spark plugs feature trivalent plating. This silver or chrome-colored finish on the threads is designed to provide corrosion resistance against moisture and chemicals. The coating also acts as a release agent during spark plug removal. NGK spark plugs are installed at the factory dry, without lubrication or anti-seize.
Anti-seize can act as a lubricant, altering torque values up to 20 percent, increasing the risk of spark plug thread breakage and/or metal shell stretch. Thread breakage can sometimes involve removing the cylinder head for repair. Metal shell stretch changes the heat rating of the spark plug and can result in serious engine damage caused by pre-ignition. Do not use anti-seize or lubricant on NGK spark plugs. It is completely unnecessary and can be detrimental.
2. Corona stain
Corona stain is a light brown or tan discoloration on the outside of the ceramic insulator above the metal shell/hex. Corona stain is created by the high voltage traveling thru the plug that attracts the dirt or oil particles surrounding the exposed ceramic insulator between the wire/coil boot and spark plug metal shell. Corona stain is completely normal and should not be mistaken for exhaust gas blow-by or a broken seal inside the spark plug.
3. Gapping fine-wire spark plugs
While most NGK spark plugs are pre-gapped, there are occasions when the gap requires adjustment. Care must be taken to avoid bending or breaking off the fine-wire electrodes. NGK recommends a round wire-style or pin gauge gap tool to measure the gap. If the gap must be adjusted, use a tool that only moves the ground electrode and does not pry between or against the electrodes. NGK also recommends adjusting the gap no more than +/- 0.008” from the factory preset gap.
4. Torque
Torque is crucial in the ability of the plug to dissipate heat and perform properly. Always follow the manufacturer recommended torque specification. An under-torqued spark plug can lead to excessive vibration and improper heat dissipation, causing spark plug and/or engine damage. Over torquing may cause any of the following: thread damage/breakage, compromised internal seals leading to gas leakage, metal shell stretch leading to poor heat dissipation and pre-ignition.
5.“Copper spark plugs”
“Copper spark plugs” is a term often used to describe a standard material spark plug. However, this terminology is incorrect, as standard material plugs do not have electrodes made from copper. Copper is soft with a low melting point and cannot be used for electrodes, as they would wear very quickly. A standard material spark plug uses a nickel-alloy that may include a small copper core. The copper core has nothing to do with the electrical performance of the spark plug. A copper core is used to increase heat dissipation and durability by lowering the electrode temperatures. Nearly all NGK spark plugs, including precious metal iridium and platinum plugs, have a copper core to increase the electrode durability. Special nickel alloys, platinum, and iridium electrodes, along with copper cores are all used to enhance durability – durability meaning how long a spark plug will last before it needs to be replaced.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,439 Posts
I will say there are certain cars [Fords?]where the spark plugs are known to seize for whatever reason, part of it being the very long service times available in modern plugs

I think that most people who have owned Lotus' for any time would be pretty amused at the thought of anything at the bottom of the spark plug well being clean and dry.

I have never stripped a spark plug, no matter how greasy
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
685 Posts
There is enough trace oil around that area that I don't worry about seizing and do worry about torque specs, so I just use the "snug plus 2/3 rotation" that the package prescribes. I never remove and replace because the crush-washer is now crushed and the original recipe is not applicable. They are not that expensive, plus I track the car so I replace them annually.

Sent from my Pixel 4 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,370 Posts
I use some of the silver anti-seize. I don't know the torque. The NGK package says something about tightening by hand and then turning an additional amount. The additional amount was something like a 1/4 or half turn.

I started to use the anti-seize after I noticed it was very difficult to remove the old plugs. I'd also seen a post on this site about one member having broken a plug when trying to remove it.
 

·
Premium Member
2005 Elise LSS Saffron Yellow
Joined
·
1,082 Posts
A touch of silver antiseize on the threads of plugs going into aluminum heads (dissimilar metal). A touch of copper antiseize on plugs going into cast iron heads (all ferrous metal). I'm careful to keep it away from the electrical bits and away from the seal (crush washer or conical face). I quit using oil on the threads because of carbon buildup close to the combustion chamber.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Most (if not all) manufacturers nowadays advice against using any anti-seize due to the anti-seize will lower the conductivity between the spark plugs and head, and they said it could cause ignition issues, especially with modern cars with high compression engine. But then that's modern cars with modern engine technology.

There is legit risk of seizing the plug and the risk is too high to take, so I'd just dab a tiny bit of silver anti seize (emphasizing tiny bit).
And always use torque wrench or a well calibrated pair of hands when tightening.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top