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I have a 2012 IPS, and while I still think it's a fantastic car, I have to admit I'm starting to look around. Has Lotus given any indication that they will be offering more than paint colour and fender updates for MY2015?

What time of year does this sort of news start to "leak" out?
 

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Illegal Alien
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In the late summer or fall. They are not GM introducing next year models a year ahead. What fender updates?
 

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Illegal Alien
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Only thing of recent that I have heard of is convertible Exige S introduced March 26 in Malaysia
 

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Rumour on lotus forums is that Lotus will announce something this month. But, I don't expect much, except the resolution to the airbag exemption issue.
 

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Illegal Alien
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Of course 2015 was going to be the big splash year for the DB projects, those are gone. Lots of rumor about Evora changes but I doubt much more substantial than '12 updates.
 

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2012 updates? That's freaking laughable. Lotus is on a one-way road to nowhere with this BS Indonesian company that's only concerned with profits running the show.

Somebody needs to save this cool little racecar company. Like now.
 

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Hmmm, that would be Malaysian, not Indonesian. Oh, and they kind of are spending money now promoting the brand both in and out of the US. If you watch F1, you would notice the constant running of Lotus Evora commercials.
 

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Hmmm, that would be Malaysian, not Indonesian. Oh, and they kind of are spending money now promoting the brand both in and out of the US. If you watch F1, you would notice the constant running of Lotus Evora commercials.
Okay, why are they not selling to the largest market in the world?
 

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BTW, show me where all the marketing is in the US. It's virtually non-existent. The company has almost zilch cash flow and is operating on a string. Until it gets real FINANCIAL MUSCLE behind it, we're going to be hearing about these cute little stories about an ad here, and ad there, modest product line improvements, etc.
 

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The 2012 improvements were initiated before DRB (current company) took over from Proton. I think the path they are taking is sensible. I have a feeling that Lotus can only really survive if a huge automobile company takes over like VW or another company of a similar size. The economies of scale and car parts that VW/Audi implement across their range of companies would probably give Lotus huge savings. Lotus would probably be valuable for its patents and engineering arm.
 

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BTW, show me where all the marketing is in the US. It's virtually non-existent. The company has almost zilch cash flow and is operating on a string. Until it gets real FINANCIAL MUSCLE behind it, we're going to be hearing about these cute little stories about an ad here, and ad there, modest product line improvements, etc.
Welcome to Lotus. This is the way it's ALWAYS been for the company. It is a small company building niche cars with very limited appeal, especially in the U.S. Economies of scale dictate that they cannot compete on price. And prices are high compared to their relative build quality reputation...deserved or not.

The legendary handling of their cars appeals to a relatively small group who are willing to put up with the price of entry and myriad idiosyncracies.

They do have full page ads regularly in R & T and Classic Motorsports. Not exactly a marketing campaign, but it's there.

Why don't they sell here? Their cars have such a narrow appeal in terms of ownership (everybody likes to look, take pictures, sit in...but owning is something else) that when they introduce a new model everybody who wants a new one and can afford a new one gets one the first year or two they are out. Then new car sales drop as pent up demand has been satisfied AND new car sales compete with lightly used Lotus that soon show up on the market.

Look at this very forum. People are always looking to buy a leftover on the cheap. And whine if a dealer won't come down on price. They also whine about the cost of taking the car to the dealer for service. Or the cost of parts when buying from a dealer.

If people wanting Lotus are buying used or always beating down the dealer on price, and are looking for alternatives for maintenance, why, exactly would a dealership even WANT to carry Lotus?

Everybody wants to buy/maintain everything as inexpensively as possible, sure. But disincenting dealerships to even carry the brand isn't in the Lotus owners' community best interest.

It costs a lot to get a car to federal spec to sell here. And the volume they can expect simply does not justify the cost. If they were to build a truly compliant car, with no temporary exemptions, it would compromise a lot of things the Lotus faithful insist upon and it would be prohibitively expensive.

And the company worried about profits? What else should they be worried about? Even Chapman himself wasn't selling street cars to be altruisitc...he wanted the money to fund his racing. Aside from being a funding source for racing, he had little interest in selling road cars.

Towards the end he seemed to be more interested in his aviation hobby than in cars.
 

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Welcome to Lotus. This is the way it's ALWAYS been for the company. It is a small company building niche cars with very limited appeal, especially in the U.S. Economies of scale dictate that they cannot compete on price. And prices are high compared to their relative build quality reputation...deserved or not.

The legendary handling of their cars appeals to a relatively small group who are willing to put up with the price of entry and myriad idiosyncracies.

They do have full page ads regularly in R & T and Classic Motorsports. Not exactly a marketing campaign, but it's there.

Why don't they sell here? Their cars have such a narrow appeal in terms of ownership (everybody likes to look, take pictures, sit in...but owning is something else) that when they introduce a new model everybody who wants a new one and can afford a new one gets one the first year or two they are out. Then new car sales drop as pent up demand has been satisfied AND new car sales compete with lightly used Lotus that soon show up on the market.

Look at this very forum. People are always looking to buy a leftover on the cheap. And whine if a dealer won't come down on price. They also whine about the cost of taking the car to the dealer for service. Or the cost of parts when buying from a dealer.

If people wanting Lotus are buying used or always beating down the dealer on price, and are looking for alternatives for maintenance, why, exactly would a dealership even WANT to carry Lotus?

Everybody wants to buy/maintain everything as inexpensively as possible, sure. But disincenting dealerships to even carry the brand isn't in the Lotus owners' community best interest.

It costs a lot to get a car to federal spec to sell here. And the volume they can expect simply does not justify the cost. If they were to build a truly compliant car, with no temporary exemptions, it would compromise a lot of things the Lotus faithful insist upon and it would be prohibitively expensive.

And the company worried about profits? What else should they be worried about? Even Chapman himself wasn't selling street cars to be altruisitc...he wanted the money to fund his racing. Aside from being a funding source for racing, he had little interest in selling road cars.

Towards the end he seemed to be more interested in his aviation hobby than in cars.
great write-up
 

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Welcome to Lotus. This is the way it's ALWAYS been for the company. It is a small company building niche cars with very limited appeal, especially in the U.S. Economies of scale dictate that they cannot compete on price. And prices are high compared to their relative build quality reputation...deserved or not.

The legendary handling of their cars appeals to a relatively small group who are willing to put up with the price of entry and myriad idiosyncracies.

They do have full page ads regularly in R & T and Classic Motorsports. Not exactly a marketing campaign, but it's there.

Why don't they sell here? Their cars have such a narrow appeal in terms of ownership (everybody likes to look, take pictures, sit in...but owning is something else) that when they introduce a new model everybody who wants a new one and can afford a new one gets one the first year or two they are out. Then new car sales drop as pent up demand has been satisfied AND new car sales compete with lightly used Lotus that soon show up on the market.

Look at this very forum. People are always looking to buy a leftover on the cheap. And whine if a dealer won't come down on price. They also whine about the cost of taking the car to the dealer for service. Or the cost of parts when buying from a dealer.

If people wanting Lotus are buying used or always beating down the dealer on price, and are looking for alternatives for maintenance, why, exactly would a dealership even WANT to carry Lotus?

Everybody wants to buy/maintain everything as inexpensively as possible, sure. But disincenting dealerships to even carry the brand isn't in the Lotus owners' community best interest.

It costs a lot to get a car to federal spec to sell here. And the volume they can expect simply does not justify the cost. If they were to build a truly compliant car, with no temporary exemptions, it would compromise a lot of things the Lotus faithful insist upon and it would be prohibitively expensive.

And the company worried about profits? What else should they be worried about? Even Chapman himself wasn't selling street cars to be altruisitc...he wanted the money to fund his racing. Aside from being a funding source for racing, he had little interest in selling road cars.

Towards the end he seemed to be more interested in his aviation hobby than in cars.
This is beginning to sound like a chicken vs. the egg thing. Lotus aficionados wanting cheap eggs is no different than the notion of the Porsche wannabe buying a base Boxster in order to get his foot in the door. That shouldn’t translate into there not being a market for other higher-end offerings. I didn’t come to Lotus looking to save 20k by buying a second-hand Elise. No, I came looking for an alternative to the 911 and I found it, appropriately priced at ~ 90k. I’d be willing to bet that if the company introduced an eight-cylinder GT in the 120k range and gave it characteristically great Lotus handling, there would be tremendous interest.

Instead, all we hear about are incremental changes to now 5-year-old model and the rumor mill about whether the V6 Cup is ever going to be offered street legal in the U.S.

Build the cars, give them the mystique and irreplaceable Lotus feel and the buyers will come. Let it happen at the expense of a VW or similar to how Aston Martin transitioned away from Ford to being owned by an engineering firm but with significant cash input from other sources, almost all of them geographically tied to the product they build.

I’m afraid the Malaysians are too culturally removed and too tight with the purse strings to fully appreciate what the Lotus name means to the automotive world or to change the current direction of the company.
 

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If people wanting Lotus are buying used or always beating down the dealer on price, and are looking for alternatives for maintenance, why, exactly would a dealership even WANT to carry Lotus?

Everybody wants to buy/maintain everything as inexpensively as possible, sure. But disincenting dealerships to even carry the brand isn't in the Lotus owners' community best interest.
To be fair, based on the horror stories about bad dealership experiences posted on this site, it's no wonder that folks have an adversarial relationship with their local Lotus dealer and seek an alternative source of service.
 

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To be fair, based on the horror stories about bad dealership experiences posted on this site, it's no wonder that folks have an adversarial relationship with their local Lotus dealer and seek an alternative source of service.
Forgive me the appearance of hopping aboard the complain train, but it goes beyond occasional bad service. The dealer network is so thin it becomes the luck of the draw whether you get one convenient to where you live. For me it's a 90-mile drive, which essentially burns a full day every time I go in for service. To boot, the various fit and trim niggles Lotus is infamous for almost ensure I'm trotting back to the dealer every couple months.

It's for that reason alone (I love the car) that I've put mine up for sale to test the market. I suspect I'm not alone in my thinking.

No doubt many of the posters here will question why I wouldn't do my own work, but not every Lotus owner is inclined to want to invest the time or energy to be a do-it-yourselfer. It boils down to whether the company wishes to further its traditionally narrow niche or branch out to entice more mainstream buyers and hence build the dealer network. The current direction obviously favors the former.
 

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Forgive me the appearance of hopping aboard the complain train, but it goes beyond occasional bad service. The dealer network is so thin it becomes the luck of the draw whether you get one convenient to where you live. For me it's a 90-mile drive, which essentially burns a full day every time I go in for service. To boot, the various fit and trim niggles Lotus is infamous for almost ensure I'm trotting back to the dealer every couple months.

It's for that reason alone (I love the car) that I've put mine up for sale to test the market. I suspect I'm not alone in my thinking.

No doubt many of the posters here will question why I wouldn't do my own work, but not every Lotus owner is inclined to want to invest the time or energy to be a do-it-yourselfer. It boils down to whether the company wishes to further its traditionally narrow niche or branch out to entice more mainstream buyers and hence build the dealer network. The current direction obviously favors the former.
I understand your frustration. The only reason I'm considering an Evora is because I have a well-respected dealer (Auto Europe) about fifteen minutes from my house.
 

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It's for that reason alone (I love the car) that I've put mine up for sale to test the market. I suspect I'm not alone in my thinking.
No you're not. I'm having a tougher time encouraging potential buyers on this forum to buy an Evora. Granted, none of the many issues I've had have actually prevented me from driving the car, but I've never gone more than 120 days without something going wrong. When my dealer was 20-30 minutes away and gave me a free loaners, I didn't mind it as much. It was like having a second car ever 2-3 months.

But right now, I'm looking at my glass and saying "WTF?!! This isn't Kool Aid!!" The combination of poor quality (and I don't blame Lotus per se but being a small company means you don't have as much leverage with suppliers) and lack of local dealer support has me wondering if I'll make it through another year with my Evora.

But, back to the original post, I think DRB is focusing on expanding new markets and milking the current cars for the next year or two. In the mean time, U.S. dealers just need to sell the 1-3 year old cars they have and try to hang in there. When Lotus does come out with a new model, they'll try to rebuild their U.S dealer base though I doubt DRB will actually keep them that long.

And while I'm on a rant here, I think Bahar had the right idea. Overly ambitious, more show than substance, too much extravagance but still the right idea. Even if just one of the five cars made it to production in 2015, it would be a better position for Lotus than where they are now.

I'm ranting because I'm not just some guy randomly talking about Lotus or playing online wannabe business consultant. I have an Evora and each time there's a problem (even a minor one) it's now a more difficult issue I need to deal with. I now have to schedule a trip to resolve the 2013 oil line recall and I'm not taking a second trip to pick the car up. Some may say, "if it causes you such distress, sell it." If I could sell it without taking a $10K to $15K hit, I'd do it today. When I bought my second Evora new last April, I knew it would be harder to get out of than the demo car Evora I first bought. But, the one major factor I didn't see coming was loosing my local dealership which has become the game changer.

Whew. end rant. :TD:
 

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No you're not. I'm having a tougher time encouraging potential buyers on this forum to buy an Evora. Granted, none of the many issues I've had have actually prevented me from driving the car, but I've never gone more than 120 days without something going wrong. When my dealer was 20-30 minutes away and gave me a free loaners, I didn't mind it as much. It was like having a second car ever 2-3 months.

But right now, I'm looking at my glass and saying "WTF?!! This isn't Kool Aid!!" The combination of poor quality (and I don't blame Lotus per se but being a small company means you don't have as much leverage with suppliers) and lack of local dealer support has me wondering if I'll make it through another year with my Evora.

But, back to the original post, I think DRB is focusing on expanding new markets and milking the current cars for the next year or two. In the mean time, U.S. dealers just need to sell the 1-3 year old cars they have and try to hang in there. When Lotus does come out with a new model, they'll try to rebuild their U.S dealer base though I doubt DRB will actually keep them that long.

And while I'm on a rant here, I think Bahar had the right idea. Overly ambitious, more show than substance, too much extravagance but still the right idea. Even if just one of the five cars made it to production in 2015, it would be a better position for Lotus than where they are now.

I'm ranting because I'm not just some guy randomly talking about Lotus or playing online wannabe business consultant. I have an Evora and each time there's a problem (even a minor one) it's now a more difficult issue I need to deal with. I now have to schedule a trip to resolve the 2013 oil line recall and I'm not taking a second trip to pick the car up. Some may say, "if it causes you such distress, sell it." If I could sell it without taking a $10K to $15K hit, I'd do it today. When I bought my second Evora new last April, I knew it would be harder to get out of than the demo car Evora I first bought. But, the one major factor I didn't see coming was loosing my local dealership which has become the game changer.

Whew. end rant. :TD:
Lol, as we drove away from the dealer last week, I remarked to my son that it was the first time since I had bought the car that it had been perfect. Not more than five miles later, the wiper fluid reservoir warning light came on. The reservoir was full and the sensor had gone bad. :facepalm

I'm like you, Allan, relatively upside down on my car in spite of buying it new at a supersized discount. I'm looking at the possibility of taking a hit to sell, and, frankly, I'm not sure I want to do that. The car still gives me oodles of pleasure to drive. I suppose the closer I get to the warranty expiration, the more the depreciation curve will flatten out. Fingers crossed.
 
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