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I'm going to get a dog for the first time. I've decided that I want an adult dog and personally would rather adopt a dog from the pound/shelter/rescue etc. I've toyed with the idea of a retired greyhound for a few years and now that I'm serious about getting a dog...any thoughts/experiences?
cheers,

ps. The yard is getting fenced and I live two blocks from a fenced in dog park that's half a football field in size.
 

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babak,
I know a woman (she's a nurse) has had greyhounds as pets forever.

She says they can make great pets. If you like, I'll try to get her email addy and she can give some details on the whys and wherefores as well as pitfalls
Chris
 

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That'd be great. I think I've learned all I can from faq's etc and adoption sites (who are biased) I know they are gentle and friendly with a pack mentality. Still a longterm owners perspective would be great. I'm PM'ing you my email to forward to her if she's agreeable. Thanks.
 

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My parents adopted one. Or maybe they got it from someone that had adopted it. They need room to run, so a big yard would be good. If it is a fenced dog park that might work.

Their dog is very docile and lives with five other dogs. It does have problems. If it gets out, you will not catch it, if it does want you too. It is very fast. Second their dog has been known to open doors. The door knobs in the room it stays in have teeth marks. It can get on top of the kitchen counter (all four feet). It can be very needy. Theirs wants to be close to you and likes to be petted, a lot.


We have two dogs, they were pound puppies, one 9 weeks and the other 6-9 months. Big puppies can eat big things... tables, shoes (only expensive women's leather shoes, armoirs....

I think a greyhound would find it difficult to ride in an Elise :D and you should find a way to cut off the airbag.

Greg
 

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I've had 2 retired greys and they are a great dog and make a great pet. If you get one, they will love the dog park, but I'd suggest muzzling them the first couple times you go until they get used to the other dogs and such. Don't want them mistaking a Chihuaua for a rabbit (I never had an incident BTW)

But...

They do have their quirks (but you're buying a British car...all things are relitive right...?!?). They sometimes require special food or medicine, they often go through some separation anxiety, and if they do ever get lose, you will not catch them, just too fast...

Even with all the quirks, they are definately worth it.

PM me if you want more info.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Racer X said:
I think a greyhound would find it difficult to ride in an Elise :D and you should find a way to cut off the airbag.
I think the Landy will retain its true utilitarian function, rubber interior, easy to hose down and a back door that opens like a car door (toward the curb in the US but away from the curb in UK :D) which is good to keep toes from getting stuck in it. No doggies in the Elise. Although, it IS an elegant animal and would look very classy with it.
 

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Eddie Haskell said:
IBut...

They do have their quirks (but you're buying a British car...all things are relitive right...?!?). They sometimes require special food or medicine, they often go through some separation anxiety, and if they do ever get lose, you will not catch them, just too fast...
Separation anxiety is from their pack living/mentality right? I.e. they treat us as part of their pack.
 

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babak said:
Separation anxiety is from their pack living/mentality right? I.e. they treat us as part of their pack.
Yes, for the most part, their entire lives are spent in crates along 20 other dogs. So, if they're the only dog in the house, and no one is around, they can freak out, tear things up, etc.
 

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I haven't owned any greyhounds, but have owned a lot of other dogs, including many abused and neglected dogs... crate training is a definite good thing when the dog is first getting used to you and your house. It gives them a 'safe haven' where they can relax, and it gives you peace of mind when you're away, and aids with housebreaking. Have a lot of patience, particularly with any dog from the pound. You have to get them to start thinking in a whole new way, and it takes some time. Lots of good books out there on the subject.

I got one of my dogs from the pound about three months ago, she was about two days from being euthanized, as no one would adopt her. She wouldn't let anyone close without snarling and trying to take their fingers off. She's all of 4.5 pounds. It turns out she'd been abused and neglected pretty badly, mainly over housebreaking, we think. She's gotten over the fear of people, and is one of the nicest dogs I've ever owned... still working on the housebreaking, but it's coming along. She was conditioned to believe that doing her business was wrong altogether, rather than making the connection that it is just wrong in the house. So she still tries to hide when she needs to go, or runs a long way away from me to go when we're outside. There's been several times where I've had to wait for an hour or so for her to go, so I could praise her and give her treats. Just trying to break the old conditioning, and it takes TONS of patience.

My other dog and I go to agility trials, which is like autocross for dogs. A bunch of obstacles are laid out, and the dog goes through/around/over/under them for time. Your greyhound would probably adapt to it well, and it is a good way to give him some exercise.

Good luck with your greyhound! I've only heard good things about them.

Cade
 

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I used to have a greyhound. Got it from a racetrack in WI. Our female was a really nice and docile dog. A crate is a must. If you get one join a sight hound club. They have cool little events where the dogs get to run. Kinda like the track days you will soon be addicted to... ;) You need to give your dog the chance to run. They are really amazing to watch when in full stride.

It's a big comittment. You will not be able to come and go when you please unless you can keep the dog outside (which may not be good in the winter).
 

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Can't say enough about Rhodesian Ridgebacks. A fantastic breed. There are Rhodesian rescue societies in various states.

That being said, hats off to you taking any breed dog from the pound or shelter. Patience is certainly in store, but the rewards are manifold in the long run.

My sister had a rescue greyhound. They do need to run more than many breeds, and man are they fast. Anxiety when left alone can be an issue, but seems dog-specific.

Best of luck.
 

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MotorCade said:
I got one of my dogs from the pound about three months ago, she was about two days from being euthanized, as no one would adopt her. She wouldn't let anyone close without snarling and trying to take their fingers off. She's all of 4.5 pounds. It turns out she'd been abused and neglected pretty badly, mainly over housebreaking, we think. She's gotten over the fear of people, and is one of the nicest dogs I've ever owned... still working on the housebreaking, but it's coming along. She was conditioned to believe that doing her business was wrong altogether, rather than making the connection that it is just wrong in the house. So she still tries to hide when she needs to go, or runs a long way away from me to go when we're outside. There's been several times where I've had to wait for an hour or so for her to go, so I could praise her and give her treats. Just trying to break the old conditioning.

Cade
Strong work.
 

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Our neighbors, two moves ago, had adopted a greyhound. It was a totally mellow dog unless it saw a rabbit and then hang on. Great dog though..
I have three dogs right now, a Golden, a Schnauser, and a Cocker Spaniel what a study in contrast!
 

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Babak, good luck with your dog, let us know how it goes! Glad you're finding one from a rescue.

To add to what Shinoo said... your dog would take to Lure Coursing readily... he's already basically trained for it! They drag a lure, and he chases it. Unless I'm mistaken, most of the sighthound clubs do a lot of it. So join up with some kind of club, you and your dog will love it.

4Speed, Thanks! It's all worth it when I come home and see three wagging tails!

Cade
 

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I agree with what everyone has said. We have a greyhound, "Cookie" (from her racing name "Elmo's Cookie"), who is about 11 years old. My wife's parents also have one ("Dust", for "Gold Dust").The basics are as follows (some things were mentioned before):

- very calm 95% of the time, typically with two 15-minutes bursts of energy per day. The rest of the time they're a rug with feet.

- Very loving and affectionate, content just to be in the same room with you. Happy greyhounds have big smiles!

- not too bright :) Very endearing though!

- most come housebroken/crate trained. Once they get the idea that they whole house is their crate, they don't want to go in the house anymore.

- small animals that move quickly initiate "target lock," in which hound will usually not respond to any commands until "target" is caught! Hopefully they reach the end of their leash first...

-Their whip-like tail can be a deadly weapon if you're face is at dog-level.

- much faster than you, so see previous. It's also cool to go the the dog park with the "Ferrari" of the dog world. I would say "Elise" but they're neither small nor light... they are long, lean and powerful.

- genetic diseases/flaws not as bad as in other breeds. Bad teeth can be one genetic trait. Track diseases are somewhat common, Bebezia (sp?) being one. It's a dog-only autoimmune virus that's very similar to HIV. It can lie in wait forever with no symptoms, or it can spring on the dog without warning. Cookie has it, but so far we've seen no signs. *crosses fingers*

- A 12-year old greyhound is an old dog.

- The oldest recognized breed of dog.

That's all I can think of for now. They're sweet dogs and I would recommend one to anyone.

-Winston
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Ok,
Been a busy weekend, met a Lotus yesterday and had a dog delivered to my house this p.m. Everybody meet Dewey Quick Draw, I'm going to call him Quick. Just wanted to thank all of you with the advice you gave me about this topic.
Cheers,
 

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Here in CT they retire greyhounds from racing at about age 3 or so. They are docile, need space as you know. Some friends who have two had to train both of them to be able to go up and down stairs. They had spent their whole world in 2D and now they found out about up!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
that's pretty much where I'm at, he's been retired for over a year but had been in a kennel since then. He is deathly affraid of stairs, I'm going to let him figure it out at his own pace. I think once he settles down into a routine and realizes that this is his new home not a cratebox in a kennel he'll want to explore up and down.
 

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Congrads. Beautiful and sleek!

Have you thought of getting a rabbit or four to keep him company? ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Allan Gibbs said:
Congrads. Beautiful and sleek!

Have you thought of getting a rabbit or four to keep him company? ;)
My backyard is full of them, I have no garden left all the pepper/basil plants have been eaten a couple of times over. I figure he can eat whatever he catches, fair game. ;)
 
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