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Discussion Starter #1
Thinking of using Pergo flooring in a couple of heavy traffic rooms in our home. We have cats and dogs.

Anyone here have Pergo? How do you like it? Stand up to tough use? What about liquids, spilled or otherwise.

Any insight appreciated,

TIA,
Jenn

Edit, we also may be installing this ourselves to save some cash. The new pergo has the backer board already installed on each sheet. We'll be using the glueless type. Anyone here install themselves? Was it hard?
 

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I work on the TV show Extra. About six months ago we had a new set installed with a Pergo floor. Well, Its not holding up too well. The floor is starting to come up in a few places and there are chips in many of the peices. Now mind you, I'm sure that you won't be rolling 300 pound camera rigs on it so it'll probably be ok. But when it comes to tough use.... it aint looking so good.

Jose Soriano
 

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I have it in my kitchen and family room for the last 3 years. I have two australian shepherds and I am amazed how well it holds up. It doesn't scratch at all. Dogs are really hard on regular hardwood. It doesn't shine like real wood but is way better for abuse.

Water will warp it if not wiped up and dried quickly. Where I have some large potted plants the plate underneath the pot sometimes overflows if I water too much. In places where I didn't notice the floor has lifted a bit at the seams. Really minor damage.

Overall it really takes alot of abuse and I highly recommend it.
 

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I almost went with Pergo, but as mentioned above, it warps with water and some dogs might do some damage to it. (I think it really depends on the dog and how well you groom the dog. Long, ungainly dog nails might scratch the Pergo.)

I am currently investigating Bamboo flooring. I have learned that it's VERY hard, looks good, and as a readily renewable resource, it's plentiful and priced moderately.

Bob
 

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I'm installing some now

I'm literally in the middle of installing a Pergo Prodigy floor right now. So far not so tough and it really looks nice. I can take some pics if you really care or feel free if you have any specific questions, I'm more than happy to assist.

Jim
 

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I'm still in the middle of house hunting so I can't offer hands on experience but recently I've been turned on to cork flooring. You may want to consider that or a genuine linoleum floor. Some links:
<A HREF="http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load/kitchbath/msg052049334310.html">A thread about cork</A> on a pretty good <A HREF="http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/">home forum.</A> Two good links from that thread are <A HREF="http://www.duro-design.com/">Duro, a manufacturer</A> with "showcase" pics from high traffic places like a Hard Rock Cafe and university buildings, and <A HREF="http://rima_wa.home.comcast.net/kitchen/photos/after_12.jpg">a picture from user Rima_WA.</A> I think I would go with natural cork planks but pictures like that make me reconsider.

Then there's <A HREF="http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/knowhow/interiors/article/0,16417,202857,00.html">This Old House's take on linoleum.</A>
 

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Not Pergo, but I have installed oak hardwood in the kitchens of this house and my last house and have been very happy with it.
 

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I prefer stone floors. Slate, Marble, Limestone, Travertine... they just do it for me. My current place came tiled w/ white ceramic (bleh), but I'm not going to redo it, since I'm a short-timer. My next place will be mostly rough cut stone.

If I DID go w/ wood, I don't think I'd use pergo. Although I've heard good things, there's just a warmth that real wood brings out. Synthetic anything is just too "flat", and feels cold and devoid of life.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I grew up in homes with hardwood floors/area rugs and I always hated them. Cold. Slippery. When I visited friends homes who had carpet I always was envious. lol


I like stone too, but that just wont work with this house. In fact I LOVE stone. If I could I'd live in Hogwarts Castle. My dream home would be a Castle or grotto but alas I cannot afford either.

Im 30 years old, this is our first "home". We just started this whole remodeling mess and while I suspect we'll be here at least 5 years I'd like to do things right but not go crazy with the spending. IMHO the Pergo and Dupont product actually look pretty good and not at all "void of warmth". I understand where you're coming from though Transio.

Pergo will cost us $2200 for our living room, kitchen and hallway IF we install it ourselves. Installed would be $4800, so it looks like we're installing it ourselves! We have 3 bedrooms and a recreation room which we plan on carpeting with a berber type carpet. I would like to get it all done for around $4000 total if possible.

JDW, Im VERY interested in your experiences laying it..I'd love to hear more or any details or hints. In addition to Pergo looking at a Dupont product that is brand new and carries a 30 year warranty.

I appreciate all the other ideas too and will look at those before we make our final decision. Im looking for ease of installation, cost and durability. We have cats and our cats sometimes vomit ( yeah I know its gross but I think cat owners will understand) and Im worried about how the Pergo will do if a cat vomits and Im not home to clean it up immediately?
 

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We have Pergo in our kitchen; it's held up great but we havn't really abused it.

My parents installed some imitation Pergo in their house by themselves, and found it to be much more difficult than they were led to believe (they had apparantly watched some DIY videotape). However, they had some friends who had installed it before, and their help proved invaluable and made the job go smoothly. So, it sounds like an easy thing to do, just has a fair learning curve.

As for cats vomitting, I doubt it'd be too much of a problem...vomit is usually a somewhat thick consistency, so the amount of liquid that could seep through the cracks - IF the cat happens to deposit it there - is pretty small.
 

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Robert Puertas said:
If your house is slab on grade, consider just staining the concrete slab. That's what I did at my house. If you're interested, I can take a photo tomorrow and post it.
I would be interested, that is very different.
 

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My house had several different types of flooring when I bought it, carpet, ceramic tile, linoleum, and even some kind of poured linoleum-like flooring in the bathrooms. All of that was ripped out, and then the floor was sanded with a giant orbital sander - they use something similar for restoring hardwood floors, and polishing stone floors. Then I laid out a grid and a border and snapped chalk lines which were then cut 1/4" deep with a radial saw. The concrete is then cleaned to get up all of the dust and dirt, and then stained with acid.

My experience is that the darker colors work best, the color I picked was Scofield's "Padre Brown." A second coat was put down along the border areas to darken them up. Finally, the sawcut grid lines were grouted.

Different areas will take the color differently, and you'll notice that the kitchen looks a bit darker than the living room. You can also see the faint ghosting of a grid where the tile used to be in the kitchen. I have left all of the cracks and holes from the carpet tack strips, and I enjoy the variation and patina that the floor has.

I've had several people ask how I could afford to get those huge slabs of marble, and some people think it's leather at first glance.
The total price for this floor ended up being just under $3 per square foot, 6 years ago in southern California.

The color can fade a bit in high traffic areas, like under my chair in the office, and there's a light spot in the laundry room where some liquid Tide dripped and sat for a couple of days before I saw it. All of this stuff just adds character, and of course you can't really hurt it by spilling food or anything else on it. It gets mopped every couple of weeks, but I don't put any wax on it or anything like that.

Let me know if you have any other questions.
 

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The beginning proces hasn't been too bad but with the holiday weekend I haven't finished the job yet. Do look into getting the installation kit. At $17 it's a ripoff for what you actually get but it does make installing easier with the hammer block and the simple end tap bar. The spacers you can make yourself by slicing up a piece of 1/4" hardboard.

Two things worth mentioning so far. One, since the floor is floating you may notice a curve in your installation line after a few rows are in. This happened to me after tapping on the boards to seat them when there aren't very many in place to hold it in place. Just eyeball it and gently lift and pull the offending edge back into place like you would when spreading out a bed sheet.

Second, be careful when seating ends, I've had a few pinch funny where a ridge on the tongue shears off and impedes the joint from meeting tightly. Just watch for it and take them apart if you see this, you can fix it or just replace the offending boards.

I don't know if this is any help or not. If you want more just PM me and I'd be happy to call you to chat. I may learn a few more things as I get close to the end.

Regards,
Jim
 
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