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Discussion Starter #1
Hey,

I’m new to this forum.

I had a 2006 Lotus Elise a couple of years ago and loved it. Very fun car to drive. I’m back in the market and looking to spend $70-75k. I’ve seen a few 2017 Evora 400’s with low mileage and a manual tranny around that price point.

I cycle through cars pretty quickly, so the exit is always in the back of my mind.

With the GT’s available, thoughts on the hit on resale value for a 2017/2018?
This will be the lowest production car I’ve ever owned, and probably not high on people’s radar. For anyone that may have sold their Evora 400 (or know someone who may sold their car), seems like something that may take a bit longer to sell.

I know the location, timing, interest, price, etc plays a part in the equation. But, maybe there’s something else I’m not considering that someone else will chime in.

Thanks :)
 

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The 2017's have already taken a big depreciation hit already. If you turn over cars quickly, you probably aren't concerned about losing a few grand a year.
 

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The early cars seem to have settled in at high 30s, low 40s for N/A versions and a bit higher for the S, with '10 and '11 cars at the low end. I'm interested in this question as well re the 400s, because I'd love to get into one, and back into a Lotus. My guess - and its only a guess - that we will start to see 400s dip into the 60s in the next year or so. That's not taking into account any significant events in the stock market or economy as a whole, which would lead to further softening of prices.
 

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If you are interested in a 400. Im considering letting go of mine in the 60's. With 2900 miles, metallic silver 6 speed. Locates in texas
 

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I honestly don’t get it. It’s a car. They depreciate. Every make and model does. Some of the worst depreciation happens to mass produced cars like BMWs. Evoras have held value consistently for nearly a decade. Many cars depreciate 50% in 5 years. These cars depreciated 70% in 5 years!
https://www.autoblog.com/photos/photos-cars-worst-depreciation-5-years/#slide-1280631
Well, I clicked on this link expecting to see my Maserati Quattroporte ... but not expecting it to be #1 on the firggin' list. I was wrong. Yep, numero uno, the worst deprecation of any current production car.

Here's the thing, though. I love that car! I love that Ferrari built twin turbo V8 more than anything. It's just sublime. Never been a big HP guy, more into tossable little cars with precise handling - hence my love for Lotus.

But the Quattroporte GTS made me realize there's a place for a luxury sedan with plenty of room and an epic motor in the stable.

Guess I'm keeping it forever, which is fine by me :cool:
 

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NO
 

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All I care about is the fun I will have owning a car, no thought at all about resale. And my bigger loss is usually on money spent on mods, I do them for my own enjoyment and know you don't get most of it back. My Huracan has over $80k into it and around $15k on my Evora.
 

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Scott M
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I think it's hard to know until we've already been at the flat spot and holding steady for a while. What Steve already mentioned seems to match what I saw when looking for 12-18 months before getting serious and buying a 14 Evora S last August.
 

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If you worry about depreciation, get the 2010/2011. They won’t go any lower. If you want to play with the big boys you have to pay. I don’t think the Evora is depreciating more than any other sports car, while cost of living is lower than the most.


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What I have noticed is that it takes a long time to sell a Lotus. I have followed Elige and Evora prices for a couple of years pretty closely and for the Eliges especially they have held their value but only to the right person. That person takes 6+ months to come a long by the looks. From what ive seen Id guess a quick sale for an Evora NA would be $35k, Evora S $45k, Evora 400 $65K(or less). (obviously depending on year and miles)
 

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Small market for sure. Relatively unknown brand. Part of its charm! Plan ahead. be able to buy the new one and just be patient selling the old one unless you don't mind the trade in hit.
 

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When it's time to sell mine will be looking to get what I see stock ones at similar mileage and year are going for and buyer gets all the mods for pretty much free. My cars usually sell pretty quickly doing this
 

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It's a machine. Use it. I just broke 50000 miles. Drive it and smile.
 

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Of course they'll depreciate but if you've been following prices since introduction you'll know that the initial $100K list price 400s dropped to an average mid $70K for brand new cars. Now low milage used ones are selling (or listed) for just a bit less than that and dealer listed low mile 400s have barely depreciated at all from what their last "New car" selling prices were. I believe the GT's intro has actually firmed up used prices for 400s since the new cars are realistically considerably more expensive. This makes the late model 400s very attractive proposition compared to buying a new GT.

If like me one was an early adopter, well then you took it on the chin. I could wish I'd waited to buy a new one in the 70s, but I bought it when I bought it. So for some of us the depreciation has been rather ugly whereas for latecomers, the depreciation has been almost nil considering used ones are now selling (or asking) for around 70K. Even at 65K, the low end of the Evora 400 market represents minimal depreciation for a now 2 year old used car that was originally available in the low 70s.

I think the big depreciation is over for these cars and they can be expected to drop a bit more and then stabilize. In the further distant future they may even become more broadly recognized objects of desire. That part's speculative but as long as you didn't pay too much for your 400 to begin with, the numbers are actually quite attractive. The GT didn't hurt the 400. It actually buoyed it.
 

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Anyone that had an Elise in 05 heard all the same whining. Look what the things are selling for now. better resale value than a Ferrari....and you can actually drive it.
 

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While I don't have the investment in my '05 Elise that goes into a new Evora, I will admit to taking more care with it than I do with my other cars. It's both more fragile in some ways, and more expensive to repair. Personally, I've always felt that the economics of owning a truly fun car had to include a 'fun factor,' because, let's face it, you're otherwise down to a total cost/mile calculation that gets you into something like a manual transmission Yaris with the base engine. Further, the fun factor allows you to bias your shopping for fussiness/exotic on one side of the equation versus the fun factor on the other.

This sort of informal utility function (I admit it, I am a systems engineer) led to some interesting conclusions: I was considering an S2000 at one point and decided against it because they are old and abused enough now that they don't justify their resale prices. The Fiat 500c Abarth fell out of the running because the annoyance factor of dealing with Fiat-Chrysler's penny pinching ways coupled with the fact that the cloth sunroof wasn't convertible-like enough was not sufficiently overbalanced by the gratifyingly low cost, high fun factor, and rich scope for modification the car offered. A new Miata underwhelmed because the new engine wasn't out yet. A new 124 Spyder Abarth was on the shopping list but I couldn't find one anywhere and I wasn't going to buy one (and put up with FCA) if I couldn't test drive it first.

Should resale value figure into shopping for a toy car? Well, I'd argue (as do most economists), that essentially all road cars are depreciating assets which can be instantly destroyed to a very low residual value. Comprehensive insurance on a $100+ K car isn't peanuts. This sort of calculation led me to the conclusion that I would never own a lot of the classic sports cars (Ferrari California Spyder, etc) I'd admired for the simple reason that the cost of ownership was so high and the car so valuable that it wouldn't be fun enough (couldn't dare to drive it much, or far, or park it anywhere) to own to justify its presence in my life. If I have to treat it like valuable art hung on the wall, I might as well have bought art and hung it on the wall because it requires less upkeep and is easier to protect.

That said, I'm not doing dumb things that deliberately hurt resale value either. I was careful to buy a not-pristine example because I bought a car to drive. That said, if anything, I think its sale value might have gone up a little since I bought it because there were a lot of things that were wrong with the car that I've since fixed. I think that's probably the right compromise. Take care of it, don't deliberately do things that really ding resale, but don't leave it on the shelf or you're not actually getting any fun or use out of the money you're spending on it.
 

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I bought a 2014 Evora N/A laser blue three years ago because it's my dream car. It has tons of options including Suedetex. I worried about miles and resale value when I first got it. Now that I've had it a while, I'd rather drive it and enjoy it. The car is so unique that there will always be someone who wants a very unique car. Drive it and enjoy it.
 
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