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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
..and report back. Here is a view taken from down in the passenger side footwell of an LTS (non-LSS car). You can see the mount for the Elise steering rack. The rack shim is shown and you can see the rivet, and two rack bolts. You can also see the identifying cutouts on the vertical sides of the shim. Three per side for the LTS cars.

I have heard for a long time that the LSS cars have a different rack shim (8mm different rack height) and now am hearing that both LTS and LSS use the same shim. Maybe this is an S2, S3 or Federal thing I am not sure and my service manuals and parts lists are still not here.

Let's find out for sure! Look into your LSS car's footwell and count how many cutouts or marks are along the sides of your shims. One rumour says 5 (five) per side for LSS. The they-are-all-the-same rumour possibility should show 3 (three) cutouts per side. Thanks in advance!!

PS: This is how bump steer is adjusted on the Elise. If you don't stay stock and lower the car alot this is something you should adjust. On shims for different rack heights, the distance between the bolts stays the same since those go into the rack, but the distance from those holes to the rivet hole is different. That rivet goes through a precisely located hole in the frame and locates the shim and therefore the rack as desired heightwise. The holes in the frame for the rack bolts are oversized so that height changes can be accommodated...

 

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steering rack mount LSS

It almost appears the same. I cannot see both sides of the shim. I took pictures of both the passenger's and the driver's side, and include them both. The driver's turned out better because you can see the notches.
 

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Only one way to tell:

Measure distance from rivet at bottom to first bolt.

If sport-pack cars use a different one then this distance should be bigger (rack mounted higher in chassis).

As the sport pack for the 111R/Fed-Elise seems to be a lot less 'agressive' and lowered compared to the S2 LSS setup sold here for the Rover powered versions (which usually drops the car at least 10 to 15mm to around 115/120mm ride height and is *significantly* harder riding) it may well be that they didn't fit the different plates as it wasn't really required.

Bye, Arno.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
>>>Only one way to tell: Measure distance from rivet at bottom to first bolt. <<<

Yes but Lotus already uses the side markings to distinguish amongst the shims. I doubt that they would use different rack heights whose associated shims must be individually measured by the assemblers. Too many chances for a mistake.

I suspect as you pointed out that the Federal LTS and LSS are similar enough in ride height that no change was needed to stay in the sweet spot.

This appears to be good news for those contemplating changing from one setup to the other.
 

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offroadr35 said:
so that means the only differences between LTS and LSS are the wheels/tires, shock valving, and spring rates, correct?
Ride height and possibly alignment.
 

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Ride height is only considered "user adjustable" under SCCA rules if the factory service manual describes a procedure for changing it.

There may be other grooves in the shock you could put the circlip in, but they're off-limits unless it's officially recognized as a normal adjustment by the manufacturer.

For instance, there are additional holes in the frame of the Audi S4 that could be used to change the control arm mounting point for more camber. However, they're really there because another model that shares the A4 platform uses them, and are not mentioned in the service manual...so the control arms have to be mounted in the original factory locations.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
>>>Ride height is only considered "user adjustable" under SCCA rules if the factory service manual describes a procedure for changing it. <<<

I'm still waiting for my Factory Service Manual. I'm sure it's in there or will be since Lotus has spoken about the ride height adjustable suspension and it's been in the marketing materials. I think I may have read claims that they could be used for rudimentary corner weighting. But we will have to wait and see for sure.

The damper body has 3 (three) grooves cut into it. A C-Clip fits into the selected groove and is retained by the spring perch which it in turn retains at that position under the spring loading. The car's seem to be delivered with the center groove in use. So there is one higher and one lower position available. The grooves are 5 mm apart so there is a 10 mm total range. The 5 mm increment would result in more than that amount of change at the wheel/tire. It's not like you can drop the car a couple inches and corner balance it to the ounce.
 

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When I toured the factory I remember something about the steering rack mounts being different, darn if I can remember what the difference was. Something is different in how the rack is mounted.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
>>>When I toured the factory I remember something about the steering rack mounts being different, darn if I can remember what the difference was. Something is different in how the rack is mounted<<<

That's what we were trying to look into...supposedly the change was the rack shim which sets the height of the steering rack. Now it kinda looks like all Federal Elises get the same shim as the ride heights are not much different LTS versus LSS. Maybe the sports package on Non USA cars runs at a lower ride height than ours, so the bump steer must be retuned.
 

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fantastic! I can do the rest of the changeover myself. Happy me.:)
 

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Nick Adams told me that there was a spacer or difference in a spacer for the steering rack because the car was set one setting lower.
 

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One (remote) possibility is that one of you has the wrong spaces. In other words they could be the same even though they shouldn't be the same.

Some more data points would be nice. Chris and Randy?
 

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Mine look like the pics above.
 

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This from Lotus UK,

FYI>No difference in the shimming of the steering rack on the LSS and standard suspension car.
Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
>>>This from Lotus UK, FYI>No difference in the shimming of the steering rack on the LSS and standard suspension car. Chris<<

Thanks Chris. Woohoo! It's easey-peasey to change from touring to sport, it turns out. You can change out the hard parts very easily, but note that you should realign the car accordingly. It may not need any changes, but this should be checked.

Chris can you check another thing out? Does the service manual provide information about changing the ride heights? I know how to do this, it's very easy. But if it's not in the service manual, you cannot legally change it in SCCA stock class. Believe it or not but if certain words alone are in the Service Manual, it can affect the competitive position for those running Elises. That is no hard parts have to change, just words.

Same thing on the ABS wire holder / shim for the front suspension. I doubt it, but if the SM states that it can be removed and the wire retained in an alternate manner, this would gain a useful amount of negative camber range for those exploring the outer limits and who need to stay SCCA legal. If you remove that 1 mm shim, you can gain another 1/3 degree of negative camber and then retain the wire with zipties or something. Some are saying that for autocross we may not wind up with enough negative camber so every little bit might help.

There are a few other similarly subtle things that I hope Lotus is aware of and handling. That way the car could be as competitive as possible over many different classes in addition to be a wonderful sports car for the street.

Oh yeah another example....the limited slip option that supposedly is on the way. If it comes out as an option on one or more cars, then anyone can update their car in an SCCA legal fashion to include LSD should they feel the need to do this. If it came out as an 06 or later mod, only the 06 cars could compete with one in SCCA stock class. If wider wheels become an option, they should be offered on the 05s as a factory option. This stuff has to be factory installed. It cannot be slapped onto new cars (not yet delivered to a customer) at the port, at the distribution center or at the dealer and be legal. BUT. If the factory does it...then any already sold cars can have it added in any way they want, as can future cars that did not already come from the factory like that. They would have to change any associated parts too to be legal. For example, to run the 6.5 front wheels of any brand, the associated LSS springs must be used. Paperwork!

Thanks.
 
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