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Discussion Starter #1
(yes, I am aware of the other thread on this subject but I would rather not hijack that thread.)



I have a warehouse that I am trying to secure. I'll try to explain what my warehouse looks. The outside: Commercial area, security guard on duty 24/7, The warehouse has one sliding door with a roll up door behind it. It also has an emergency exit door located next to the sliding door. Those are the main entrance points of the warehouse. On the opposite side of the warehouse entrance is a ladder to the roof. There are also two skylights.

So far, I have installed an alarm system with motion sensors pointed at the skylights and the doors. I also have 3 hinges welded onto the wall to secure the sliding door. I put 2 locks on the bottom of the roll up door and I have a lock and a steel bar on the emergency exit door.

My problem: I had a break in a month ago. Nothing was stolen. The police believed that the point of entry was the sliding door/roll up door because the locked hinge was torn off. However, it became clear to me that the point of entry was actually the skylight. The security guard saw no cars parked on the street. I am assuming then that what they had done was park there vehicle in the residential area and walked across the water way, up the ladder and in through the sky light. They then rolled up the roll up door and used the truck or forklift to break the locked hinge on the sliding door.

I have since reinforced the sliding door with two more locks since the time of the break in and I also have a sensor on the roll up door as well as motion sensors focused on the sky lights.

Now, since I am trying to cut costs, I am required to be in several places at once during operating hours. I am working on setting up an effective and practical inventory system but as of now, I do not have an accurate and cost effective means of knowing what I have and where it is at all times. Because of this problem, I can never leave the warehouse alone when installers/workers are present.

I want to be able to see who and what are going in and out of my warehouse at all times. I have read that there are motion sensor systems which send an alert to the user when they are activated. This would be ideal.

A problem I have with the sliding door is that the hinges are very malleable. In fact, the other day, one of the hinges FELL OFF as I was closing the warehouse. How can I effectively secure this sliding door?

Next, the sky lights. Previously, the hatch to open the sky lights was on the roof. Now the hatch is secured to the inside of the ceiling. The sky lights, however, look like they can be broken into, regardless of the hatch. Is there a way to prevent any possible entry via skylights?

The current fence that I have around my business only stretches along the back side of the business adjacent to the water way and partially along the front and main street. Needless to say, I need an upgrade. I need to be able to secure my parking lot from trespassers. Should I look into barbed wire or some other means of deterance?

Finally, for those that are familiar with securing a business, how much will this run me? I already mentioned that I am in the process of cutting costs but certain measures (such as security) are worth spending some attention to.
 

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Are the sky lights necessary? Could they be closed over and install lighting in the warehouse instead?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Are the sky lights necessary? Could they be closed over and install lighting in the warehouse instead?
The property is being leased so I do not wish to make any permanent adjustments. If it were up to me sheets of metal would be welded over and under the skylights.

Regarding the surveillance system, I am not sure how many cameras I need. Can anyone give me a recommendation of a system with cameras that would work best for my situation?

Ideally, the surveillance system will be digital and able to be accessed from the internet.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Can you detach the ladder and store it inside?
That is a good idea. The only problem is that the ladder is probably 50' tall and space is a premium in my warehouse. The other obvious problem is that I will have to get the landlords go ahead. I will look into it, though.

Thanks!


Anyone in So Cal know any good video surveillance or fencing companies?
 

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If it's a 50-foot ladder to the roof, how would they lower themselves 50 feet once opening the skylight?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
If it's a 50-foot ladder to the roof, how would they lower themselves 50 feet once opening the skylight?
There is a rack that is located a couple feet to the side of the rear sky light.

Fire code/fire marshall will probably insist that the ladder stay in place.
Yes...this is correct. I can't remove the ladder.


It seems that a full on gate/barbed wire fence surrounding my business will cost 6-7k and that is way more than I am willing to spend on a gate. What I'm thinking about doing is raising the fence on the backside of the warehouse and lacing it with barbed wire. This will stop anyone from crossing the waterway. Then the only way to get in and move stuff is on the side with the security guard present 24/7.




Anyone got ideas on the video surveillance?
 

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It seems that a full on gate/barbed wire fence surrounding my business will cost 6-7k and that is way more than I am willing to spend on a gate. What I'm thinking about doing is raising the fence on the backside of the warehouse and lacing it with barbed wire. This will stop anyone from crossing the waterway. Then the only way to get in and move stuff is on the side with the security guard present 24/7.
That seems like a feasible idea.

Anyone got ideas on the video surveillance?
This only helps with incriminating or identifying persons associated with the crime.

In security, the only thing you can do is make it harder and longer to get to the "prize." You can never make anything secure-proof, but you can make gold look less and less valuable with several deterrents and vices.

In my practice, they say the best object to secure is a brick. Nothing can come in and nothing can come out. :)
 

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Well trained and very large dogs.

Seriously.

A barbed wire gate can just be cut through in seconds. Sure it'll keep the common kid out looking to mess around, but not a determined thief.

Aside from the sound of a shotgun cocking, to me the most intimidating thing is a couple of big dogs.
 

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Make sure your people are trustworthy, motivated and trained properly. No security device can detect or thwart incompetent or corrupt operators.

I learned this lesson in high tech. "Social engineering" is the greatest threat from criminals.
 

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Improving security is about making your property less attractive to a perp. This means increasing the amount of time that is necessary to gain entry and increasing the likeihood that the perp will be seen and caught. You can do this in a number of ways.

1. Physical security - Hardening your facility by installing better locks, bars over non-necessary openings, razor wire, etc. will make it take much longer to gain entry.

2. Lighting - increasing outdoor lighting will increase the likehood of someone noticing something out of the ordinary.

3. Intrusion detection systems - sensors on doors, windows, volumetric motion detectors, photoelectric beams, fence alarms, etc. act as initiation devices to trigger a local visible and audible alarm and can intiate a police/ guard response. Combined with video alarm verfication, this can be very effective.

4. Video - used to both deter as well as document is also effective against internal theft, vendor theft, productivity issues, harrasment, drugs, workplace violence, etc. Cameras (either analog or IP) placed at entrances and areas of interest combined with a digital recording or network video processing software/ recording and remote video access may be the most effective means of capturing a perp after the fact. The cutting edge of the industry includes video analytics that can make real time decisions about what is happening, turning video into intrusion/ activity detection systems.


Since you've already paid for an IDS (alarm system), complimenting it with a video system that you can view remotely upon receiving an alarm event might make sense. A simple DVR with a few high resolution, day night cameras (should be over 500 TVL with an removalbe IR cut filter) with a built in NIC can be connected to your existing network. Most of these systems include unlicensed remote view software and/or a built-in webhost. Look at a Pelco DX4000 series recorder with Pelco, AD, GE, or Bosch day/ night cameras for instance.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well trained and very large dogs.

Seriously.

A barbed wire gate can just be cut through in seconds. Sure it'll keep the common kid out looking to mess around, but not a determined thief.

Aside from the sound of a shotgun cocking, to me the most intimidating thing is a couple of big dogs.
Actually, one of my business neighbors has two big rottweiler's that roam around the front of there business during the day. I have a schutzhund trained german shepherd but it wouldn't be feasible to have him, or any vicious dog for that matter at my work. Think of the lawsuits. -eek-

Make sure your people are trustworthy, motivated and trained properly. No security device can detect or thwart incompetent or corrupt operators.

I learned this lesson in high tech. "Social engineering" is the greatest threat from criminals.
You know, that is one thing I am working on right now.

I know the best way to deter workers from stealing is to not present the opportunity. Unfortunately, the opportunity is currently wide open and that is what I'm trying to change by updating my inventory procedures. I've also been trying to create a sense of family and trust among the workers by having office smoothie days and work picnics. I fear, however, that this may not be enough, though. Do you have any suggestions on how to keep people loyal and trustworthy to me and the company?

Thanks!

[/QUOTE]
 

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Here's what I would do to secure the warehouse.

First forget the outside fence. Those are too easy to cut thru with a small pair of wire cutters. Anything short of concertina razor wire is no real obstacle.

The ladder to the roof can be secured by having a three sided masonry structure built in front of it with a steel security door. The top of the masonry would have concertina razor wire on it. This enclosure could also be alarmed. The local fire dept. and police would probably need the keys.

Steel bars under the skylights either welded or hinged with locks. The building owner may like the idea for security for his building. Your insurance company may lower your rates if you add more security for the building.

The sliding door and roll up door can be secured at night/weekends/holidays etc. by parking your forklift with the forks used to make opening the door from the outside nearly impossible. The emergency door must be secure and entry with a key from the outside possible.
 

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Actually, one of my business neighbors has two big rottweiler's that roam around the front of there business during the day. I have a schutzhund trained german shepherd but it wouldn't be feasible to have him, or any vicious dog for that matter at my work. Think of the lawsuits. -eek-



You know, that is one thing I am working on right now.

I know the best way to deter workers from stealing is to not present the opportunity. Unfortunately, the opportunity is currently wide open and that is what I'm trying to change by updating my inventory procedures. I've also been trying to create a sense of family and trust among the workers by having office smoothie days and work picnics. I fear, however, that this may not be enough, though. Do you have any suggestions on how to keep people loyal and trustworthy to me and the company?

Thanks!
Dogs are messy and must be well trained to be of any use.

Criminal background checks and references (check on the references) and drug testing (if your product line is pharmaceuticals) for all employees. Good pay, good benefits and fair treatment of employees will help. The picnics etc will help. Take them to a ball game. I spent 34 years in electrical construction working in pharmaceutical companies, defense plants, jails and a lot of other places where having the right employees was absolutely necessary. I had as many as 105 employees working for me on a job and as few as 2 or 3. Making everyone feel like part of a team (or family) gets good results.
 
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