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I had already taped over the front intakes last year after reading your A/C mods writeup, (great info by the way).... just irritaiting when buttons and lights don't work right.

If I am getting fan speeds in position 1 and 2, but nothing from position 3, is it probably going to be a problem with the switch and not the resistor?

Don't worry about the recirculation, just tape over the front intakes and you have recirc all the time.
 

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I had already taped over the front intakes last year after reading your A/C mods writeup, (great info by the way).... just irritaiting when buttons and lights don't work right.

If I am getting fan speeds in position 1 and 2, but nothing from position 3, is it probably going to be a problem with the switch and not the resistor?
Do the same jumper test as described above. If you get the same results as with the switch being turned 1 though 3, it is likely corrosion at the resistor pack.
Michael
 

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Since I haven't seen any pics for mounting location on the plate with resistors I thought I would share these. Pretty simple really, just mounted it so the resistors are facing down. Seems to do fine with an aluminum plate mounted to composite/plastic-ish looking stuff. I've ran the blower on low and med for 30min straight with no overheating to speak of.
 

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Okay..I just did this over the weekend so I thought I would share my experience and a couple tips...but first a little rant: Lotus Engineering--you can either make it so something is highly unlikely to fail OR you can make it easy to fix, but not neither! What a PITA!

-I thought removing/installing the clam was pretty easy. There are a lot of steps, but just go through them methodically. Ratcheting box wrenches are the key I think. Makes it easy to get to some of the difficult bolts. Takes about 2 hrs.

-I installed the resistor pack kit available from Lotus. It is a little pricey, but it very complete and an obviously superior design. It moves all of the wiring up out of the bottom of 'well' so it should not get wet. When installing it, re-route the blower wires out of the top of the foam ring so they are accessible without removing the blower motor. I also found that contact cement worked great for re-mounting the foam rings on the blower motor.

-Take your time to remove everything out of the way when removing the HVAC mixing box and blower motor. It is a tight fit and everything gets scrapped and stressed and it it is a pain to keep checking to see if you are damaging anything as you yank it out. I ended up using zip ties to hold everything away from the top of the 'well'. You might as well take your time and do it at the beginning...you will end up doing at some point.

-The worst part of this BY FAR is getting the blower motor and HVAC box in place and mated. I have a couple tips. Remove the foam padding from the bottom edge of the HVAC box sheet metal. This edge has to slide over the mating blower motor sheet metal and the foam stops it from sliding. You don't have to remove much, just enough to expose the metal corner.

-After struggling for a couple hours to get things lined up and in place I ended up drilling a hole on bottom edge of the motor mounting sheet metal and using some zip ties to I could rotate the blower as I pushing down on the HVAC box by pulling on the zip ties. This was a huge help. I'll try and post a picture.

-Buy some friction tape (cloth electrical tape) to fix all the places you will wear it off as you are moving things around.

-Protect any sharp edges that might contact the wiring harness with duct tape. I was paranoid I was going to cut through the wiring harness until I did this. There is A LOT of yanking and pulling and sliding during this surgery...

It is do-able in one weekend, but it is very time consuming...
 

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I have my clam off now on my 2007 Elise. Everything is working ok at this time, but should I do any PM while it's open? It does have the holes in the well already.
 

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I am evaluating a "work-around" that eliminates the time and brain damage associated with replacing the OEM resistor pack...will need to be done someday on my car and just planning ahead.

I have reviewed the various resistor pack replacement threads and have some questions:

1. Can the terminal connector plugs be removed from the resistor pack without disconnecting A/C lines, heater matrix lines and removing the blower motor from the box area?

2. Why not just relocate the resistor pack module to a more convenient / serviceable location and use jumper wires to connect to the OEM resistor pack terminal connectors / wires?

3. Since any replacement resistors should have constant air flow to remain cool, why not fabricate a small resistor housing with a 12V fan that activates only when the A/C is switched on?
 

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I am evaluating a "work-around" that eliminates the time and brain damage associated with replacing the OEM resistor pack...will need to be done someday on my car and just planning ahead.

I have reviewed the various resistor pack replacement threads and have some questions:

1. Can the terminal connector plugs be removed from the resistor pack without disconnecting A/C lines, heater matrix lines and removing the blower motor from the box area?

2. Why not just relocate the resistor pack module to a more convenient / serviceable location and use jumper wires to connect to the OEM resistor pack terminal connectors / wires?

3. Since any replacement resistors should have constant air flow to remain cool, why not fabricate a small resistor housing with a 12V fan that activates only when the A/C is switched on?
I have mine apart now, and can answer some of this:
1) Not a chance. It all has to come out.
2) I believe that's what this thread is about. Relocating it.
3) I don't see why you couldn't.

What I am going to look into is locating it within the fan housing as designed, but on the top side of the fan rather than the bottom side. Not exactly super accessable, but certainly more accessable than it is now. Plus, one should not need to access it once fixed.
 

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Thanks! -eek-

Please share your relocation fix once done. You idea is similar to the design of the $300 Lotus retrofit kit.
I found it was far more worrying about how to go about doing it, than actually doing it. In other words, now that I've done it and understand how the things are situated, are mounted, and go in and out, I could do it again very easily and with little drama. It's the "not knowing" that was the hard part for me.

I won't formulate a solution until after the new year and do a little research. I hope I can come up with something, but also know when not to re-invent wheels. :)
 

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HF AC Vacuum

I was very close to buying a $100 vacuum pump just to complete the repair and I stumbled upon this at Harbor Freight.... fits the job perfect, creates more vacuum than most of the basic vacuum pumps out there (up to 28 in/hg)and a lot cheaper.... 17.99 before coupons!

It's run by creating vacuum from a compressed air stream so you have to already have an air compressor capable of producing 90 psi to make it work.

Vacuum Pump - AC Vacuum Pump w/ R134A & R12 Connectors
 

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I replaced by mine with out evacuating the HVAC or pulling the box. It is like trying to squeeze a St. Bernard though a cat door but I got the blower motor out, relocated the resistor pack and reinstalled into the same tight hole. And just scratched but not cut on.
I've been going through all of these threads, looking at replacing my resistor pack. Discharging the AC system to remove the HVAC is a little out of my league as far. Has anyone had any success like this guy in replacing the pack without removing the HVAC? I'm clinging to any hope here; I'd rather not have to put it in a dealers hands for work I can do myself.
 

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I've been going through all of these threads, looking at replacing my resistor pack. Discharging the AC system to remove the HVAC is a little out of my league as far. Has anyone had any success like this guy in replacing the pack without removing the HVAC? I'm clinging to any hope here; I'd rather not have to put it in a dealers hands for work I can do myself.
I wouldn't get your hopes up. You'll notice how no one has been able to actually describe "how" they did this, all I see is "PM me for information", or "I did this" with no responses when pressed for how. In my opinion this would defy laws of physics without cutting through the structural material under the car, I can't see how you can remove the bolts and get the old pack off the bottom of the unit without removing it. You could try PM'ing those who have supposedly accomplished this. Let us know if you actually get a response.
 

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I wouldn't get your hopes up. You'll notice how no one has been able to actually describe "how" they did this, all I see is "PM me for information", or "I did this" with no responses when pressed for how. In my opinion this would defy laws of physics without cutting through the structural material under the car, I can't see how you can remove the bolts and get the old pack off the bottom of the unit without removing it. You could try PM'ing those who have supposedly accomplished this. Let us know if you actually get a response.
Yes, it is discouraging that there's never any follow up information to such claims. I suppose it's possible that each of these people who have said that they did it immediately fell into a bottomless well after posting their bold accomplishments and are therefore unable to post any additional information, but it does seem more likely that it didn't happen to begin with. I'll try the PM route.
 

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You can't do it without disconnecting the AC. The blower motor is connected to the AC mixing box (which contains the evaporator) and both have to come out to get to the resistor pack. The AC isn't that big of a deal and is just like the AC system in any car. I had mine evacuated at a local gas station ($50) and filled it with a canister I bought at autozone. I added the recommended amount of oil when I refilled and capped off the drier and any tubing as quickly as possible when I disassembled. I also replaced some of the o-rings when I reassembled, but that was probably overkill since they all were in good shape when I took them out. AC has worked flawlessly for 2 years and at least 20k miles since I replaced the resistor pack.

Honestly, the AC is the most straightforward part of this job and all the parts and expertise you need is at any local parts store.
 

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I agree with Bryan to some degree... it is straightforward. I had never done an evacuation/recharge before and I was able to do it with a little Internet guidance. I'll add that the system really should be vacuumed down and checked for leaks before recharging... this gets moisture/air out of the system which is bad for ac performance/longevity but also helps you leak test before you reassemble and leak out $50 worth of refrigerant and oil all over the place.
Or worse, a slow leak after you get the clam back on and drive around.

Besides that I also invested in some proper gauges and injected some dye with my oil in case of leaks. I also replaced (and lubed) the o-rings to make sure the system was leak-proof.

It adds a few steps that you need to get right, but it's not difficult and the information is all here, just ask if you need it.

Also, the more I think about this, the more I am also certain it can't be done. Even if you could do this without actually removing the HVAC unit, the HVAC unit can't be moved/rotated enough to get to the blower motor without disconnecting the AC lines that go to it.
 

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Replacement Kit

Yes, both of those kits are correct replacement parts. Plan on having 2 solid days to get it done, you may not need it, but I broke it into phases and took sanity breaks, clam off, everything disconnected, HVAC and blower out, HVAC and blower repaired (blower foam gaskets were all chewed up), parts back in, etc. It actually took me quite a bit more than 2 days but I did A LOT of upgrades at the same time.... all the AC fixes, mesh grille conversion etc since I had the time and the clam off.

Getting the HVAC/motor out and in is the toughest part IMHO. Every mm counts so be careful fitting the blower motor back in and make sure its as far in as possible. I used a very long flat blade screwdriver as a lever to "pry" the lips of the HVAC and blower back together, that was the trick for me. Getting them apart was just a lot of wiggling and jiggling rotating the HVAC around to get it out. Do a lot of reading on here, there's 3 or 4 really good threads and it will save you a lot of cursing and frustration to learn from others before doing. Good Luck.
 
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