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Re: Motor Trend - May '04' - Pgs 126-132
"The key to handling a blowout at 60mph is to go for the gas pedal, not the brake.
You should never stab the brakes; instead, nail the gas pedal. Only then can you gradually release the throttle, find a break in traffic and carefully steer to the side of the road to stop." Also:
*Always check tire pressure cold
*Check pressure at least once a month
*It's better to be a few PSI over than
under
*Always put new tires on the rear if you
are replacing only two tires
*Be smart about oversized wheel/tire
choices. The wrong (too large) combo
will diminish acceleration, braking, and
handling, rather than improve it.
 

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Imo,
generic advice, which could be wrongly used with tragic consequences depending on
1, the location of the affected tire.
2, the drivetrain layout of the car.
3,drivers experience.
m.
 

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I don't understand the one about putting new tires on the rear. The fronts wear faster on most cars (certainly FWD and AWD). So I think you want the tires with more tread on the front if you want to end up with equal wear.

Fortunately I've never had a blowout, but just nailing the gas sounds questionable as a general rule. If it's a rear tire on a FWD car, getting on the throttle might make sense.
 

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The reason for putting the new tires in the rear is for traction in the rain. The first inch or so (depends on model) in the brake pedal travel is brakes for the rear. If you lock up the rears it might send you into a spin.
 

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Agree with Thegit: Very generic advice. I think the advice is poorly written with the "got for the gas, not the brake." You want to neutralize the car by maintaining even throttle and slowly decelerate. It's similar to having a blow-out on a motorcycle.

P.S. Of the 3 major automotive publications (4 if you consider Autoweek), I like Motor Trend the absolute least. Their writing style isn't particularly impressive and I've had issues with some of their article references (or more appropriately, lack of accurate referencing.)
 

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Another rational behind putting the new tires on the rear is that you get steering feedback on the front tires. If enter a turn and you feel the front tires starting to hydroplane through the steering wheel you are likely to slow down to a safer speed. If the good tires are on the front, the steering will still feel good even if the rear is starting to hydroplane some. This could lead you into a spin.
 

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"Always put new tires on the rear if you are replacing only two tires."
"always":no:

"But Guv! I've got cord showing on the fronts. It's gonna be ok then?"
:huh:

m.
 

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thegit said:
"Always put new tires on the rear if you are replacing only two tires."
"always":no:

"But Guv! I've got cord showing on the fronts. It's gonna be ok then?"
:huh:

m.
In that case, you are supposed to move the existing rear tires to the front, and install new tires on the rear...:huh:

Tim Mullen
 

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What if you have different size fron and rear as on an Elise. I also understand most owners wear out rears 2-1 vs fronts. Another reason to be very careful in the wet. Especially if you have the A048Rs.

Greg
 

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Racer X said:
What if you have different size front and rear as on an Elise.
That was the reason for the ":huh:". I guess I forgot the ":D:.

Me? I always buy new tires in sets of four... Unless of course it was for a motorcycle...;)

Tim Mullen
 

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All the different smilies confuse me. I guess the :huh: is the Huh? face as evidenced by the code for it.

Ok so if you get a sidewall puncture on a front, does this mean you have to replace all the tires????

Left and right don't have the same tread, wet hydroplane on one side... pull to one side... rear tires have less grip... spin (((@))).... hit curb..... tear off wishbone attachment points.... need new chassis..... I guess replace all tires everyday to be on the safe side or buy someones worn tires to put on the front when the rears get half worn

Be really careful in the wet!

Greg
 

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I reckon it is old advise for the 50th percentile driver.
Manufacturers of Cars, no matter the engine location that may encounter a situation of traction loss want the vehicle to default to understeer.
Understeer is preferred for the masses by the automakers and the motoring comics for sales, because it is not a condition that requires immediate intervention by the driver. I,e. the typical driver, as soon as he senses belatedly that the trajectory of the car is not favorable, can:
1, Freeze.
2, figure out what the problem is.
3, swear.
4, Hit the brakes (He/they really want them to lock up and deprive him of steering control, but Damn! the ABS.)
5, Start playing with steering lock or continue plowing off the road.

As you all know Oversteer demands immediate intervention, which the less skilled will not manage to do.
m.
ps,
Of course this does not apply to those who joyride their spouses beloved pre90's P-car with their themselves and their lover stone drunk.:p
 
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