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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Here's the sequence of operation (what it does):
As you approach your Lotus with your bluetooth enabled phone, the alarm disarms and unlocks the doors. The Auxiliary Relay closes which enables the radio. The start button is not illuminated. Press the start button once (or press and hold to start the engine with little delay). The start button lights up green, the gauges light up, and the car is ready to start. Press the start button a second time, the car starts, the doors lock, and the start button turns red. Press the start button a third time and the engine shuts down, the doors unlock, and the start button goes dark. The Auxiliary Relay is still closed. Upon leaving the car, once you're out of range, the system waits 10 seconds then disables the Auxiliary Relay, arms the alarm, and locks the doors.

This is a very complicated and time consuming mod. It requires a basic knowledge of electrical circuits and soldering. You will also need the 'Electrics' and 'Body Fittings' chapters from the Lotus Service Notes (LSN) along with the wiring diagram for your model year. I have put together a zip file with the program you'll need for the controller, a link to download the programming software (freeware), and all the literature you'll need from the LSN. Just send me your email address and I'll send it to you.

Warnings:
1. Taking the dash apart requires you to remove the passenger side airbag cover. In doing so, you will break the clips that hold it in place. These clips can be purchased from or replaced by your dealer.

2. The controller I'm using has a minimum operating temperature of 32degF. I have not been able to test the controller in conditions outside of it's operating range.

3. This also requires you to modify one of your alarm fobs. This modification is not easily reversed and renders it unusable.

4. Removing the airbag may cause your airbag light to come on. This can be reset by the dealer.

5. This is to protect me. You are responsible for any changes that you make to your vehicle. Be sure to read this walkthrough in it's entirety and review the wiring diagrams before starting. In short, if you f*** up your car it's not my fault.

This project will be broken down into four parts.

Part 1. Start Button LED Mod
Part 2. Core Electrical
Part 3. Controller Wiring Notes
Part 4. Wiring Diagrams

Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Part 1 - Start Button LED Mod

Parts Needed:
-Clear Red LED (10 candela)
-Clear Green LED (10 candela)
-Resistor (this depends on the LEDs, make sure you buy LEDs that are the same physical size and electrical load because you'll be using one resistor for both)
-Medium grit sand paper
-Clear Epoxy
-Super Glue
-Solder
-Heat Shrink tubing (big enough to slide over the resistor)

Process:
Pull the panel off that includes the start button and lighting switches. This is done by removing the two phillips screws at the bottom of the panel inside the coin tray, then pull straight down to remove the panel. Disconnect all the electrical plugs and take the panel to your workbench, kitchen table, bathtub, wherever you're comfortable.

Start button assembly removal:
The start button assembly is composed of three major parts.
The Button
The Switch
The Harness

Remove the harness by pulling it straight off the assembly.
Remove the switch (the square block that the harness plugged into) by locating the recessed slot on the side, depressing the tab with a small screwdriver, and pulling it straight off the start button.
Remove the button from the panel by unscrewing the thumb nut down the threaded body of the button. There are some aluminum rings that hold the button in place, just set them aside until you reassemble.

Opening the start button:
The button itself comes apart at the very bottom. You'll see the seam and tabs. It will probably break in your attempt to open it, mine did. Be aware of the two little springs inside.

Prepping the LEDs:
The LEDs are too big to fit into the hole in the bottom of the now open button. Now we have to sand some of the meat off the LEDs.

***THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT***
Keep in mind, when you sand the LED bulbs the two flat sides will go together. And when they are together, the polarities have to be OPPOSITE of each other. That means, the anode of the red bulb and the cathode of the green bulb are on one side, and the cathode of the red bulb and the anode of the green bulb are on the other. This creates a two wire hook-up and is the reason why the bulbs have to be matched.

Now on to the sanding... the bulbs are made of acrylic, so sanding them is pretty easy. Lay the sandpaper flat on top of your work bench/kitchen table/bathtub and sand each bulb separately but equally. When sanding the bulbs keep the leads parallel to the sandpaper. Take off a little at a time for each bulb until they both fit into the start button.

Once they fit into the start button, put the bulbs into an adjustable wrench to keep them together while you epoxy them, make sure they are aligned with each other. Just epoxy the sides, not the top as this may cause the light to deflect in an undesirable manner.

While the epoxy is curing, let's prep the bulb base. Pull the bulb out. Use a small pair of needle nose pliers to pull the metal contacts out. The bulb contacts should have slip on connectors connecting them to the base. Once those are off, snap, cut, or chew off the plastic holder for the old bulb, so you have easy access to the slip on terminals.

After the epoxy has cured...it's time to solder. Cut the leads on the LEDs so that the two bulbs fit well into the start button and won't interfere with the button's operation. Next, take the round metal contact and cut each side of the partial circle so you have a straight piece coming straight off the slip on connector. With the other connector, use your needle nose to straighten the metal coming off the connector. Solder these onto the LED leads. The anode of the red bulb and the cathode of the green bulb go to one connector, the cathode of the red bulb and the anode of the green bulb go to the other connector. Slide the connectors back into place on the base. Polarity isn't all that important at this point, we'll be installing a polarity reversing relay in another part of the install. Slide the bulbs and the base back into the start button (don't forget the two little springs). Check the operation of the start button. Make sure nothing is rubbing or interfering with its operation. It should feel stock with a full range of motion. If it works correctly, resecure the base (the bulb base, not the switch) to the start button using super glue if necessary.

Cut the red wire in the harness and solder the resistor in line with the wire. Then protect the connection with heat shrink. It's easier to do if you pull the pin on the end of the red wire out of the white connector at the end of the harness (the end that connects to the car). It's tricky but worth it.

Reassemble the start button assembly.

This part is done!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Part 2 - Core Electrical

Parts
-(2) - Single Pole Single Throw (SPST) Normally Open (NO) 12vdc coil 40amp relays. Get the kind you use solderless terminals with. *
-(1) - Double Pole Double Throw (DPDT) 12vdc 10amp relay. Get the kind you use solderless terminals with.
-(20+ft) of 18/10 cable (18 gauge/10 conductor)
-(1ft) of 12 gauge wire
-Insulated butt connectors
-Fully insulated crimp on connectors for the relays.
-(1) crimp on eyelet for 12 gauge wire
-Roll of good electrical tape. I prefer Scotch's Super 33+.
-Small piece of sheet metal. 1/4"x3/4" roughly.
-(2) 3/4" #10-32 screws and nuts.
-(2) #10 lock washers

Wire Sequence for 18/10 cable (Wire colors written in ALL CAPS refer to these wires):
RED - 12vdc
BLACK - Start Relay
GREEN - Auxiliary Relay
BLUE - Start Button Reversing Relay
YELLOW - Start Button Switch
BROWN - Start Circuit
VIOLET - Lock Doors
GREY - Unlock Doors
WHITE - Ignition Switch (Key Switch)
ORANGE - Spare

FIRST AND FOREMOST - DISCONNECT THE NEGATIVE SIDE OF YOUR BATTERY AND USE A TOWEL TO PREVENT ACCIDENTAL CONTACT!!! WORKING WITH/AROUND AIRBAGS CAN BE DANGEROUS. REFER TO THE LSN FOR INSTRUCTIONS. <--my disclaimer
Ok, to make the process easier, start with disassembling the areas of your car you're going to be working in. This includes removing the seats, the bulkhead behind the seats including the foam liner (for cars with the touring package), the siderails, the steering column, indicator/wiper stalks, gauge cluster, steering wheel, and the 'Top Facia' (top of the dash) (WARNING - Removing the top facia requires pulling the cover off the passenger side airbag. Doing so will break the clips that hold it in place. *Please refer to the "Body Fittings" chapter in the LSN for instructions. Take your time and keep track of your parts. Label them if necessary. *(take note of all the GM/Delphi stamps you see) Also, make sure to double check the OEM wire colors with your model year wiring diagrams. Remember, my Elise is an '06.

Note: This would be a good time to disable your Daytime Running Lights (DRL). Look it up in the Forum. *

Ok, now the only non-electrical part...disabling the steering wheel lock. This was tricky. The instructions weren't clear about how the key barrel comes out of the column. Here's how you do it. With the column exposed, look on the right side slightly above the barrel housing facing the driver (that's you) is a little hole. Turn the key to position 1, make sure the steering column is not locked, then use a sturdy paperclip to release the barrel. It will take some patience and wiggling but you'll get it. Once the barrel is out, look into the housing while turning the steering column. You should see the lock spring up to engage. Use a small screwdriver to disengage the lock and turn the column slightly to keep the lock from re-engaging. Then use the small screwdriver to push the locking mechanism down enough to slide the piece of sheet metal above it to keep it from engaging.

Now to run the 18/10 cable from the trunk to the dash. There are a few tips for doing this on the boards. Just look up "amp install". (Sorry about the shortcuts but this project is incredibly long and complex. Besides, they have some great pictures!!!). Essentially, you'll run the cable out of the trunk through a rubber boot by the battery, through the engine compartment, through another rubber boot in the firewall into the cab, follow the existing harness through the console to the front of the cab under the dash, bring the cable into the dash behind where the passenger coin tray would be. Bring about 4 feet of cable into the dash.

Ignition relays:
On the left of the steering column you'll see a semi-round plastic cap. Remove this to expose the switch carriage. Cut the 10guage wires (brown and white) close to the carriage. Find them in the harness in the dash and pull them through back into the dash. Wire these across the NO contacts on one of your SPST relays. This will be called the Starter Relay.

Now there are three wires left on the switch carriage. One terminal has just one wire. Cut this wire leaving 5 inches still connected to the switch carriage. The other terminal has two wires left on it. Cut the small wire close to the switch carriage. Cut the bigger wire leaving 5 inches still connected to the switch carriage. Pull the cut wires back into the dash. Connect all three wires together and put them on one side of the NO contacts on your second SPST relay. This will be called the Auxiliary Relay. There is a wiring block in the dash in front of the driver (still you). It's black and about 2.5 inches wide. Pop it open and you find terminal posts. They are both unfused +12vdc. Crimp an eyelet to your 12 gauge wire and connect it to one of these terminals. Connect this wire to the other side of your auxillary relay. Connect the BLACK wire to one side of the coil for Start Relay. Connect the GREEN wire to one side of coil for the Auxiliary Relay. Run the WHITE wire down into the steering column and connect it to one of the wires still connected to the switch carriage.

Start Button:
Now to set up your beautifully modified start button. We're leaving the start button itself alone, that's done. It's the car side of the harness we're working on. You should see four wires going to a white plug. Green, Black, White/Red, Green, in that order. When you cut these wires, leave plenty of wire attached to the plug. You'll need to connect to these.

The first green and the black power the light. Follow these wires up into the dash, this is where you'll wire up the DPDT Reversing Relay. Cut the black wire. Wire the car side of the black wire to one side of the coil, to the NO side of the first pole, and the NC side of the second pole. Wire the plug side of the black wire to the common side of the second pole. Cut the green wire. Wire the car side of the green wire to NC side of the first pole and to the NO side of the second pole. Wire the plug side of the green wire to common side of the first pole. Finally, wire your BLUE wire to the other side of the coil. Now when this relay pulls in, it will change the start button LED from green to red. If you find the lights to be reversed, simply swap the two wires on the common terminals on the relay.

The white/red and the second green is the start circuit. Cut the green wire and cap/insulate the car side of the wire. We no longer need this one. Cut the white/red wire. Connect the plug side of this wire to your YELLOW wire. Connect the car side of this wire to your BROWN wire.

Your RED wire:
You should have a few missing or "loose" connections. This is where the RED wire comes in. You can bring them all into one splice or daisy chain them, it's your call. just remember to secure all your connections with heat shrink or electrical tape. You don't want to have to tear your dash apart again, especially in front of Baja Fresh, when a connection comes loose. Connect your RED wire to the following terminals/wires:
-The other side of the coil for the Auxiliary Relay
-The other side of the coil for the Starter Relay
-The unused wire dangling from the switch carriage
-The loose green wire on the start button harness (plug side)
This should wrap up all you connections thus far.

Door Locks:
Break out the drill. Do you see the round black air duct that that ends on the left side of the steering wheel? Well, it's gotta go. Just for now, so be careful. Drill out the 2 plastic rivets that hold it in place on the front of the dash. After that, pull the apex of the arch up and work it out gently. It's tricky, but you'll get it. Pay attention to how it comes out, it's even harder to get back in. The Central Door Locking (CDL) module is located irritatingly on the far left side under the insulation. Locate the orange/green wire and the orange/white wire. Please forgive me for I have forgotten which is the "lock" wire and which is the "unlock" wire. I THINK the orange/green is the "lock" wire. This can easily determined with a multimeter or changed in the trunk at the controller (I'll tell you how later). Splice the VIOLET wire to the "lock" wire. Splice the GREY to the "Unlock" wire.

Secure all your connections, tape your relays, and tie up your wires. This section is complete. Don't put your dash back together until your project is complete and tested. When you're ready use the #10-32 screws, nuts, and washers to re-secure the round black air duct to the dash.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Part 3 - Controller Wiring Notes

Refer to wiring diagrams for details.

Parts:
- TECO SG2-20HR-12D Controller - Home - FactoryMation
- TECO SG2-PL01 Programming Cable - Home - FactoryMation
- Scytek Precision Blue 1000 - Buy.com - Computers, Electronics, Digital Cameras, Books, DVDs, Music, Games, Software, Toys, Sports
- Small 12v Rechargeable Sealed Lead Acid Battery - I used the Power Sonic PS-1212
- (2) 12vdc Coil SPST NO (Normally Open) Relays
- 12vdc Coil SPST NC (Normally Closed) Relay
- Fully insulated solderless connectors for relays
- (2) feet of 24 gauge solid wire
- (2) inline fuse holders
- (2) 5 amp fuses
- Solder

Process:

Alarm Fob Mod:
This mod is not easily reversed. That said, pop open the fob as if you were going to change the battery. Slide out the battery. Use a small screwdriver and snap off the arm/disarm button. With the LED at the top, it's the button on the left. For the wire, I used a foot of twisted pair out of a CAT5 cable. If you don't have a roll of CAT5 or CAT6 lying around or a network cable you could butcher, just pick up some small gauge solid wire. Take about a foot of each wire and solder them onto the fob circuit board. You'll see a solder joint to either side of where the switch used to be. Solder a wire to each of these joints. Slide the battery back in and short the wires. The LED should blink as if you pressed the button. Your remote will have to be re-synced to the alarm system. Put the fob back together without the rubber keyring strap, Route your wires out of the hole where the strap was.

Auxiliary Battery:
You'll find a wiring diagram describing how to wire in an Auxiliary Battery, and you're probably saying WTF!?!? The purpose of the battery is to power the Ignition Mod controls while the engine starts. The starter pulls so much current it resets the TECO controller and the car doesn't start. I tried using capacitors without any luck. The starter just drained them too. That's where the auxiliary battery comes in. There is a relay that isolates the Auxiliary Battery from the car's electrical system during the start process. Once the engine is started, the Auxiliary Battery is reconnected to the car's electrical system where it is charged by the alternator.

Precision Blue 1000:
The PB1000 uses Negative/Ground outputs and the TECO used 12vdc inputs. So relays are used to swap the polarity between the controllers. Once everything is wired up and powered follow the instructions on adding your Bluetooth enabled phone.

Door Lock/Unlock Operating Backwards:
If you find the doors are unlocking when you start the engine and locking when you turn the engine off, all you need to do is switch VIOLET and GREY wires on the TECO controller.

Use Molex Plugs:
If you use Molex plugs to connect the Ignition Mod controls to the 18/10 cable, you can make a jumper plug to bypass the controls in case of failure. With the jumper plug in place, you would just use your key like back in the ol' days. With the jumper plug in place the start button is just a start button and will not turn red.

Jumper Plug sequence:
Supply Fused 12vdc to RED
Jump WHITE to BLACK and GREEN
Jump YELLOW to BROWN

Be sure to test the system a few times before putting your car back together.

Now you're done! Enjoy!

Let me know how your install went.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Part 4 - Wiring Diagrams



 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
thank you for the post
3 things
1. programing for the controller
- I'll provide you with the program. You'll need to purchase the interface cable from FactoryMation. The programming software is available for free at factorymation.com.

2. wiring diagrams for the relays
- I can draw something up. Maybe next weekend. For now I must rejoin the world of being a proper boyfriend/daddy. ;)

3. what to use and how to wire for RFID
- I'm still reseaching this. If there are any 'access control' guys out there that can recommend a stand-alone, long range (5-10 feet), preferably 12vdc, receiver. Let me know! As for wiring, it would depend on the receiver. More than likely, it would also require a program change.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
thanks once again

sorry

i take it BTMR-1/2 are the reverse polarity relays for door lock input
If you mean the door lock/unlock outputs of the PB1000 to the inputs on the TECO, you are correct.
 

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While I commend you for a really cool science project, I do have to question the net benefits. You've taken a reasonably secure system and made it trivial to bypass both the electrical and mechanical interlocks designed to keep the car safe.

What happens if someone pairs a new device to the car, can they just drive away?

What happens if the car doesn't start on the first push of the button, must you push it 3 more times to start the process over? Or is there logic in the controller to sense running phase vs starting phase?

What happens if you stall the car in the middle of an intersection and your bluetooth device is dead?

The coolness factor is definitely there, props for that. But I'll stick to my key for now.
 

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I agree, very cool, but I think there is a reason BT remains used for "accessories" as in non essential technologies. I have a BT phone that becomes non responsive to my BMW. I have a BT keyboard in the landfill because I had to pair it every day. I program Winmo handheld PC's for data collection and the dang BT scanners/printers mysteriously become non responsive.

Do you have safeties for when BT bebopps out?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
While I commend you for a really cool science project, I do have to question the net benefits. You've taken a reasonably secure system and made it trivial to bypass both the electrical and mechanical interlocks designed to keep the car safe.

What happens if someone pairs a new device to the car, can they just drive away?

What happens if the car doesn't start on the first push of the button, must you push it 3 more times to start the process over? Or is there logic in the controller to sense running phase vs starting phase?

What happens if you stall the car in the middle of an intersection and your bluetooth device is dead?

The coolness factor is definitely there, props for that. But I'll stick to my key for now.
First of all, I take offence to you calling this a "science project". I put a lot of research and design into this project, not to mention time. If you don't like what I did to MY car don't do it to YOURS. You don't need to insult me to get your point accross.

The phone sync process is quite detailed. It's not just a matter of "pairing". The Bluetooth module is "transparent" meaning it is not detectable because it does not transmit, just receives.

The start button is a START button if the engine isn't running. If the car doesn't start the first time, just hit the start button again like you would normally do. If the car stalls, the controller recognizes the engine is off, the start button turns green again automaticaly. Just press it once to start the car.

Not bad for a "science project" huh?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I agree, very cool, but I think there is a reason BT remains used for "accessories" as in non essential technologies. I have a BT phone that becomes non responsive to my BMW. I have a BT keyboard in the landfill because I had to pair it every day. I program Winmo handheld PC's for data collection and the dang BT scanners/printers mysteriously become non responsive.

Do you have safeties for when BT bebopps out?
The Bluetooth is used to start the car. Once started you can turn your phone off and the car would continue to run. The alarm will set and lock the doors 10 secs (adjustable to 15 or 20) after you turn off the engine.
 

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First of all, I take offence to you calling this a "science project". I put a lot of research and design into this project, not to mention time. If you don't like what I did to MY car don't do it to YOURS. You don't need to insult me to get your point accross.

The phone sync process is quite detailed. It's not just a matter of "pairing". The Bluetooth module is "transparent" meaning it is not detectable because it does not transmit, just receives.

The start button is a START button if the engine isn't running. If the car doesn't start the first time, just hit the start button again like you would normally do. If the car stalls, the controller recognizes the engine is off, the start button turns green again automaticaly. Just press it once to start the car.

Not bad for a "science project" huh?

Ok, poor choice of words, sorry. I have no doubt you spent a lot of time on it, that's apparent. But since you've still left the car less secure than stock, one has to ask why.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Ok, poor choice of words, sorry. I have no doubt you spent a lot of time on it, that's apparent. But since you've still left the car less secure than stock, one has to ask why.
My apologies, I may have overreacted. I agree the car is less secure at this point. I also agree that bluetooth access, in it's infancy, isn't very secure. Scytek has taken some measures to to make it somewhat secure, albeit not perfect.

As for the "why", it's simple... It started as a keyless/actionless access idea. I wanted it to unlock as I approached the car. Then, one step further, why not completely keyless? Which posed the problem of stopping the engine once started. That led to the start button mod. Finally, I figured I'd tie into the CDL module to control the doors. Coolness factor, the challenge, the education (this mod taught me me quite a bit about the Elise's electrical system)... OK! IT WAS A F'N SCIENCE PROJECT! There, you made me say it. Are you happy Now?!?!? :D

Mostly for the the coolness factor.
 

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i love the concept! I really love the RFID idea. A key chain that I dont have to take out of my pocket! No "High power" blue tooth to worry about.

Love the concept! How can I help?
 

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My apologies, I may have overreacted. I agree the car is less secure at this point. I also agree that bluetooth access, in it's infancy, isn't very secure. Scytek has taken some measures to to make it somewhat secure, albeit not perfect.

As for the "why", it's simple... It started as a keyless/actionless access idea. I wanted it to unlock as I approached the car. Then, one step further, why not completely keyless? Which posed the problem of stopping the engine once started. That led to the start button mod. Finally, I figured I'd tie into the CDL module to control the doors. Coolness factor, the challenge, the education (this mod taught me me quite a bit about the Elise's electrical system)... OK! IT WAS A F'N SCIENCE PROJECT! There, you made me say it. Are you happy Now?!?!? :D

Mostly for the the coolness factor.
Heh, I get it. It's the mountain that begged to be climbed. Engineers are always looking to be challenged. Like I said kudos, it is definitely some very cool hacking. How about a small camera and facial recognition next? J/K :bow:
 
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