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Discussion Starter #1
Installing a new built engine in my 2007 Exige and would like to get advice on break-in (located in the Texas Heat)

The engine was specified for endurance not max hp.

Specs:
ARP hardware for girdle, rods, head, and flywheel
Darton Sleeved Block
forged pistons 10.5 / 1
Ported Head
Stock thickness head gasket
Billet oil pump gears
upgraded valves (stainless) and valvesprings
Harden intake cam with stock grind
Lighten flywheel w/arp bolts
170 degree thermostat
BOE Fastworks Tune

Think of starting with Motul Break-in oil for about 200 miles and going with:
Motul 300V 0w40 https://www.motul.com/us/en-US/products/300v-trophy-0w40 or
Motul 300V 15w50
https://www.motul.com/us/en-US/products/300v-competition-15w50--2
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What do the three changes of the Motul Break-n Oil consist of?
A track day or a mileage #?

Thanks,
 

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Have you consulted with the engine builder??
 

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A1 Automotive & Smog
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As former Toyota tech (21 yrs ago) I can only remember a few manufacturer break-in recommendation:

-Period about 600-1000 miles
->3500 Rpm, light load preferred
->15 miles per warm up
-non synthetic, low to non-detergent oil. May be replaced with fully synthetic after break-in period

That was back then, I don't know if now is different. But I still do the same to all regular passenger vehicle when new and it's been trouble free.
 

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Break in oil till the rings seat. I will keep the same oil in during the break in but change the filter 2 times, once after the first set of heat cycles...about 1.5 hours. Again after 200 miles or so. The break in oil is actually prompting all the internal parts to wear in, making them fit better and removing any high places in the bearing surfaces and well as helping the rings and cylinder bore wear into a better fit. This is putting micro bits of metal in the oil so a new filter makes sense, but the oil does not break down. The goal is to get the rings to seat and have as much contact as possible which will make them seal better but more importantly creating a better thermal path to get heat out of the pistons and into the cylinder wall where it can be dissipated into the coolant.
 

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OK, I double checked with my engine builder and this is the process that they use. It takes about 15-30 minutes to break in the cam shaft. You want to change the oil filter after doing this because the high pressure lubes and sloppy use of silicon will clog the oil filter. You can change the oil at the same time to get any other residuals out of the oil but the filter should have most of the garbage in it. The next step is break in the rings which won't really happen until you have cylinder pressure. This takes about 12 good pulls on the dyno. If you had a lot of assembly debris then it would be good idea to change the filter again. Now you can start getting some stable HP numbers on the dyno.

Good Luck,
Eldon
 

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When I build an engine, there are several things I do to assure longevity.
1. I install an asswipe oil filter. These can be had brand new from Frantz or from Amsoil, and the price isn't horrible. I buy them used on eBay for < $100. Sometimes about half that. I have three permanently installed, one on my boat (454 Chevy), one on my work truck (350 Chevy) and one on my solvent tank. I have another that I use as a "temporary" on fresh engines, then it gets removed after a thousand miles or so. Installation consists of adding a brass tee to the oil pressure sending unit, or some other source of pressurized oil, a return fitting typically in the oil pan, but anywhere into the valve cover or crankcase area can work, a couple of hoses, and a location to install the filter bracket and filter canister.

These bypass filters will maintain clean "as new" oil. Any break-in wear particles are trapped in the bypass filter even if they are too fine to be captured in the full-flow filter.

2. I don't use RTV silicone as a gasket dressing, except where two gaskets or a gasket and a seal come together. RTV silicone can be used INSTEAD of a gasket, but not as a gasket sealer. There's a dozen products that can be used as a gasket sealer/gasket dressing, RTV is not one of them. And I never, ever use RTV silicone on ANYTHING related to the oiling system.

3. If the cylinders are properly prepared, the rings are practically seated by the time the engine has cranked over enough to start and run. However, just to be sure--and because it's entertaining--I will run the engine at 1800--2200 rpm on a test stand (I don't have a dyno) long enough to break in a flat-tappet camshaft (20 minutes, ten minutes, shut down and cool, then another ten minutes.) which also allows for verifying no leaks and no surprises. Once in the car, with timing set and whatever other adjustments that are needed, completed, take the vehicle 30 miles "out of town" on a deserted highway, put the thing in high gear, and STAB THE THROTTLE from ~30 mph to ~70 mph. The concept is to get high cylinder pressure, but only MODERATE RPM. Therefore, the actual speeds are dependent on gearing and tire size. Once you're at about 2/3 of engine redline, let off the throttle and coast back down to the bottom of the high-gear power band. With the throttle closed, you generate a lot of vacuum, which tends to bring oil up the cylinder walls to the rings which washes away any wear particles. Then stab the throttle again, gain speed, coast , stab, coast, stab, coast until it stops being fun. Of course you're watching the temp gauge, the oil pressure gauge, listening for detonation, etc. And if the car is an automatic, either disable the kickdown, or accelerate as hard as the vehicle will go WITHOUT dropping down to a lower gear. Again, you want high cylinder pressure alternating with high vacuum, but not high RPM.

This is almost the opposite of the Toyota recommendation listed previously. Run that engine HARD, not gently during the ring-seating part of "break in". After that, do what you want. (It doesn't matter once the rings are seated.)

4. IF (Big IF) you use heavy moly-based grease as an assembly lube on flat-tappet cam lobes and lifters, keep in mind that the heavy Moly paste can plug an oil filter in about 20 minutes. I change the full-flow filter, and the bypass filter element if it's no longer getting hot. I don't change the oil, because the bypass filter is keeping the oil totally clean. Therefore, I don't cry over dumping expensive, specialized oil three times during break-in, because I DON'T dump the oil three times, I just change filter elements--and the filter element for the Frantz bypass filter is a roll of toilet paper..
 
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