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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

I've posed this same question to Jaime @ Bethesda EuroCars, but haven't received a response yet to my email.

Knock on wood, I'll be getting back my car tomorrow afternoon. It'll have a new motor (courtesy of Lotus NA - thank you boys), REV300, and ACT HDSS clutch.

Searching the threads, I found this:

"It is important during the car's early life to limit the workload on the engine and thus control the heat generated within it, which is primarily a function of throttle opening and rpm. However, being too sympathetic on the car will not allow the piston rings to bed in satisfactorily, so a balance of spirited and gently use is required. For the first 600 miles (1,000km), use no more than moderate throttle openings (about half of the available accelerator pedal travel) and do not run the engine continuouslyt at engine speeds over 4,500. Occasional short burts at wider throttle and high rpm will be beneficial, as will a constantly changing cruising speed and making full use of the gearbox. Do not allow the engine to labour in too high a gear ratio, but change down and let the engine operate in its natural power band."

Should I follow those instructions, just as I would if the car itself was new? Does the REV300 change anything?
 

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Some people prefer breaking in an engine on a dyno if possible. If that is the preferred method of the engine builder, I would follow it. The REV 300 shouldn’t change this unless the engine was assembled differently because of the kit. You might want to speak with BOE to confirm, the different boost levels might favor a modified break-in method. Some people put a bigger importance on engine break-in than others, the higher performance the engine the more importance I’d place on it.
 

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Gamera The Atomic Turtle
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try not to have too much fun for the first 600 miles? Can't hurt -
 

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I took my car to the track to run (break) it in. I self imposed a 6,000-RPM limit...to keep it under the "second cam". A couple of times I hit 7,000-RPM, just because I caught a Ferrari and had to pass him. I stood on the gas as much as I could...wide open throttle as often and as long as I could on the track, while maintaining my 6,000-RPM limit. The materials used on piston rings and cylinder bores are so good (fine) and so hard that if you don't stand on it, it wont seat...they will just glaze over...and then never seat!
 

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There are threads on this.

I use non-synthetic oil.
Change oil soon, maybe 500 miles.
Vary speeds, never cruise at set speed on highway
Do not let car idle under 2500 rpm for long

Has worked for me for 45+ yrs.

Lotus engineer or mechanic overheard me and said it was perfect.
 

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Gamera The Atomic Turtle
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why non-synthetic? (That has always been my instinct.)
 

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why non-synthetic? (That has always been my instinct.)
The oil you use during the break-in period of an engine needs to be free of the friction-modifiers added to synthetic oils. This is because the purpose of the break-in period is to allow friction to wear parts of the engine down in a controlled manner. A synthetic oil would prevent that.
 

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Actually, a "break-in" oil is designed to protect the parts that are "waring in". This prevents "hot spots" so the parts can "lap" in together. Once their surfaces are "lapped in" (identically matched/mated), there is a larger surface area between them for parts to ride on, so that a "cheaper" oil will suffice.
 

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There are 2 schools of thought:
1) The obvious easy on her.
2) Treat it rough Break In Secrets--How To Break In New Motorcycle and Car Engines For More Power

While #1 is intuitive, the empirical evidence is that #2 is better, both high throttle (but RPM does not need to be high) as well as some RPM with no throttle to pull lots of vacuum.

Old school thought with 'regular' lifters was 2500 RPM minumum, and zinc (ZDDP). But with the slipper toyota ones I have no idea... and only applies to new cam/lifters.

The previously mentioned oil advice (of a cheap mineral break-in oil) is sound.

But it is your engine...
 

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Of the few engines I have built fresh or had built/rebuilt they have always been put on a dyno. A few easy pulls to make sure all is kosher and then WOT tuning. For built engines most people I have associated with agree on this. Hell most engines don't actually don't "break in" unless this is done.
 

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Of the few engines I have built fresh or had built/rebuilt they have always been put on a dyno. A few easy pulls to make sure all is kosher and then WOT tuning. For built engines most people I have associated with agree on this. Hell most engines don't actually don't "break in" unless this is done.
This has been my process also. The worst thing you can do is drive at a constant speed. Varying speed and rpm is always best.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
So my takeaway is this:

Use the proper oil and change it relatively soon.
Don't abuse the car, but don't baby it either.
Avoid mundane driving (constant speed).

If I'm wrong, let me know.

As an aside, car is pushed back a couple days. Oh well. Looks like bad weather (again) this weekend...
 
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