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08 Elise SC
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Discussion Starter #1
I'm moving to a "new" house and planning on building a garage. I'm trying to figure out what's the best plan of attack. The house is an old house, so the garage would be detached. There's a tiny one car garage there now, so I'll use that, build the new one and then tear it down. Budget is pretty modest, but I think enough for a nice garage....just no garaj-mahals.

So I'm thinking I want a "Two-car" garage but room enough that with a lift(s), I can squeeze up to two more in. I'd like to keep the roof/ceiling fairly low as the house isn't gigantic and I would like the garage to be proportional.

I'm thinking 24W X 36D X 9H. That leaves me space up front for a separate room for bikes and mowers. I think I can squeeze the walls down to 9 (maybe 8) because I plan to use a taller roof pitch and trusses instead of the low cross beams (sorry if terminology is incorrect - I'm not a builder). I would also drop the depth back from 36 to something closer to 30, but I don't think I could squeeze everything in since I need space for the garage doors when they are opened should I put in lifts.

Sorry for rambling...any thoughts on the size? Any features that are must-have's that I should plan on?
 

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Make is twice as big as you think is a good size, trust me on this!

How are you going to build a garage if you aren't sure what trusses are? Sounds like you have A LOT of learning to do before grabbing some lumber and a nail gun!
 

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you are in jersey... so you will be excavating ...what? 30" or so down and laying block. so your garage wall height is not driven by the stud... go with about 14" of block wall above slab, 8' stud's and prefab roof joists (flat across the bottom) as low of a pitch as snow load codes will allow. you will have ~9' 6" clear inside for a lift. (the slab will pitch slightly out the door..)

width vs depth is also a function of orientation.... so just decide, do you want the gables at the doors? or shingles? you will run the joist across the short dimension...

36' is very deep, you can fit 2 cars end to end. that deep, consider a roll up door on the other side on one end - just a thought.

plan to sheet rock the ceiling and do insulation so you work in the winter. run the power underground (sub feed from the house - 60amp 2 pole should do it as long as you don't planing on a powered "shop") might as well pop a hole in a wall for a wall a/c unit too.
 

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Won't the City let you go the whole 1000 square feet? I did, and the wife and I still argue about where the snowblower goes in the summer. She says "shop" and I say "garden shed". So far, she's winning.

I'm moving to a "new" house and planning on building a garage. I'm trying to figure out what's the best plan of attack. The house is an old house, so the garage would be detached. There's a tiny one car garage there now, so I'll use that, build the new one and then tear it down. Budget is pretty modest, but I think enough for a nice garage....just no garaj-mahals.

So I'm thinking I want a "Two-car" garage but room enough that with a lift(s), I can squeeze up to two more in. I'd like to keep the roof/ceiling fairly low as the house isn't gigantic and I would like the garage to be proportional.

I'm thinking 24W X 36D X 9H. That leaves me space up front for a separate room for bikes and mowers. I think I can squeeze the walls down to 9 (maybe 8) because I plan to use a taller roof pitch and trusses instead of the low cross beams (sorry if terminology is incorrect - I'm not a builder). I would also drop the depth back from 36 to something closer to 30, but I don't think I could squeeze everything in since I need space for the garage doors when they are opened should I put in lifts.

Sorry for rambling...any thoughts on the size? Any features that are must-have's that I should plan on?
 

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08 Elise SC
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142 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Make is twice as big as you think is a good size, trust me on this!

How are you going to build a garage if you aren't sure what trusses are? Sounds like you have A LOT of learning to do before grabbing some lumber and a nail gun!
I guess I should have been more clear. I won't be doing the actual building. I'm gonna have it built.

My current house has a 1-car detached garage (12 X 24) that I bought online and they built on site in 5 hours. Looks great and matches my house (siding, trim, shingles) perfectly. I could do something similar (but bigger) or use a local builder.
 

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08 Elise SC
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142 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
you are in jersey... so you will be excavating ...what? 30" or so down and laying block. so your garage wall height is not driven by the stud... go with about 14" of block wall above slab, 8' stud's and prefab roof joists (flat across the bottom) as low of a pitch as snow load codes will allow. you will have ~9' 6" clear inside for a lift. (the slab will pitch slightly out the door..)

width vs depth is also a function of orientation.... so just decide, do you want the gables at the doors? or shingles? you will run the joist across the short dimension...

36' is very deep, you can fit 2 cars end to end. that deep, consider a roll up door on the other side on one end - just a thought.

plan to sheet rock the ceiling and do insulation so you work in the winter. run the power underground (sub feed from the house - 60amp 2 pole should do it as long as you don't planing on a powered "shop") might as well pop a hole in a wall for a wall a/c unit too.
For my current garage, they excavated down around 27" I think...so yeah...pretty close to 30". However, it was all concrete...with the slab i can best describe it as an upside down bathtub. As for length, it's 24', which leaves about 10' up front for all of the bikes, mowers, etc. With this garage, it seems like I could get a lift in it, but to clear everything with the garage door open, I would have to remove the bikes and shove the lift to the front of the garage. But then what to do with the bikes? That's kind of how I backed into 36' deep. But, I'm not actually in the new house yet so I have to do some actual measurements to see if that's even possible/logical.

As for usage, I'm mostly looking for car storage. I'm generally way too busy to work on cars. Just basic maintenance/repairs and driving them for me...definitely not looking for a full-on "Shop." I've got two impractical cars right now, but I'd like to have the option to garage more in the future, should the need arise.
 

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It might sound like plenty of room now, but you will fill it up and need more room.

I built a 16x20 "shed" out back to put the yard equipment and other junk I didn't want in the garage. Garage is still pretty much full... and so is the shed. Planning on putting the Elise in the shed come winter, guess I will leave the tractor with the snowblower parked outside.
 

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Yes, always had a shed or loft for garden stuff.

IIRC from 10 yrs ago, stick built was about $55/sq ft, Pole Barn type was about 60% of that and the very lowest price was via the Amish. They build the garage in 2 sections and assemble on site. But, there are size limitations.

Have friends with the last option and they are thrilled with their garages and the prices.

Oh, that's where to get the shed too.
 

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I spent about 10k on my shed. That is from start to finish. Siding on it, insulated, wired, etc. I built it myself though, that is just materials cost.
 

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Lots of power 110 & 220 for compressor, welder... Heat and A/C. A floor thick enough to support the lifts. Epoxy floor. Easy access to the attic that doesn't require you to move a car or give up wall space. Attic storage space for spares... Consider an attic door that allows you to load long things (directly to the attic - great if you are an amateur radio guy). Lots of light. If you plan to have a shop area make one area for dirty work: sanding, griding, blasting... Watter/sewer so you can have a washing machine for dirty rags... shower, set tubs, (with those 2 you can wash some big parts) toilet. Plan on a ceiling fan.

Stay away from fixed shelves. Get the roll around bakers racks. You will eventually want to reorganize.

The bigger the better. Its a constant battle, I either have more money to buy junk than space to put it or more space to put things than I have money to buy junk.
 

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ok - so that was a "monolithic slab pour" its regional... but typically thats a little more expensive than "footer and block" also, i would imagine footer and block would hold up better with freezing and 100deg. and block allows you to build up, add a foot to height... 8' you will have problem for a lift, you want 9'+' - anyways...

my opinion. you get a lot out of extra width on the sides... if you have a good 5-6' clear on the sides of the doors, you can do a lot with storage, work bench, motorcycle, etc.. kinda of stuff. because you don't have negotiate around the car front to back as you do with storage on the back end. bikes, you can hang on the wall. you only need 3' to make that happen... i would plan to sheet rock and insulate it and put in a wall ac unit. very easy to do when you build it. much uglier to do after...

a 60amp 2 pole sub feed from the house should cover you for lights, a compressor, running tools, a/c etc.. i.e. - not a shop. set a 12position 60amp panel in the garage and you are good to go.

consider going ~32' (2'+8'+2'+8'+2'+8'+2') 3 spot, 24' deep - thats pretty huge-gantic. and you have the whole 3rd bay for storage
 
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