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Curious if anyone has gotten the P0014 code before?(Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Advanced or System Performance - Bank 1)

Had it pop up on my Evora 400, took it to the dealer for it and an alignment. They completed the alignment and cleared the codes. They said that it usually pops on if the oil needs changing or wrong consistency, but said the oil looked good for now and to drive it and see if it comes back on. CE light was off for a couple days and popped back on. Pulled the codes and it was the same one. P0014.
reading around, could also just be a bad sensor but I guess changing the oil, clearing the code and seeing if that fixes it is the first course of action, but I am curios if any of you all have had that issue before and what had to be done to resolve it?
 

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Illegal Alien
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From Service Notes:

Camshaft Timing Control (VVT)

P0011 Camshaft Position – Inlet Timing Over-Advanced or System Performance (Bank 1)

P0012 Camshaft Position – Inlet Timing Over-Retarded (Bank 1)

P0014 Camshaft Position – Exhaust Timing Over-Advanced or System Performance (Bank 1)

P0015 Camshaft Position – Exhaust Timing Over Retarded (Bank 1)

P0021 Camshaft Position – Inlet Timing Over-Advanced or System Performance (Bank 2)

P0022 Camshaft Position – Inlet Timing Over-Retarded (Bank 2)

P0024 Camshaft Position – Exhaust Timing Over-Advanced or System Performance (Bank 2)

P0025 Camshaft Position – Exhaust Timing Over-Retarded (Bank 2)

Description

The Variable Valve Timing system (VVT) on the intake camshafts and the exhaust camshafts can vary the
timing by approximately 35°. The camshaft relative position is varied by a system of vanes mounted on the
drive end of the camshaft. Each VVT oil control valve modulates a spool valve position in accordance with
the drive signal duty cycle, this in turns controls the oil pressure applied to the vanes. A 50% duty cycle
applied to the valve will hold the valve current timing by preventing oil flow from the VVT controller housing,
a duty cycle less than 50% will retard the valve timing, a duty cycle greater then 50% will advance the valve
timing. The ECM regulates this duty cycle based on the feedback signal from the respective camshaft
position sensor to optimise the camshaft timing.


Monitor:

• Continuous

Enable Criteria:

• Engine running > 30 secs

• Coolant temperature > 60°C (140°F)


Malfunction Criteria:

VVT error > 5 degrees for time > 2.5 secs

Potential failure modes:

• Static valve timing is incorrect

• VVT camshaft actuator failure

• VVT control valve stuck open / closed

• VVT control valve filter

Diagnostic Mask:

• The MIL will be illuminated if the faults are present for 2 consecutive trips
 

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Curious if anyone has gotten the P0014 code before?(Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Advanced or System Performance - Bank 1)



Had it pop up on my Evora 400, took it to the dealer for it and an alignment. They completed the alignment and cleared the codes. They said that it usually pops on if the oil needs changing or wrong consistency, but said the oil looked good for now and to drive it and see if it comes back on. CE light was off for a couple days and popped back on. Pulled the codes and it was the same one. P0014.

reading around, could also just be a bad sensor but I guess changing the oil, clearing the code and seeing if that fixes it is the first course of action, but I am curios if any of you all have had that issue before and what had to be done to resolve it?


Replace the engine oil to Castrol. Had the same issue with Mobile1 and after long research I learned that when hot, the later is getting too thin. Lotus recommended Havoline Europe is hard to find in the US, but Castrol is almost identical viscosity in hot, and permanent solved the issue.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Replace the engine oil to Castrol. Had the same issue with Mobile1 and after long research I learned that when hot, the later is getting too thin. Lotus recommended Havoline Europe is hard to find in the US, but Castrol is almost identical viscosity in hot, and permanent solved the issue.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
This makes a lot it sense now actually, when I drive for more than 30 mins, the car goes into limp mode, so I'm willing to bet the oil is the issue.

Will be doing an oil change for sure
 

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Make sure they used proper oil last service. My bet is they used a 5w-30 because that is what they had available. 5w-40 is predominantly a diesel wt oil.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
reading around it looks like Rotella T6 5w40 is the most popular oil choice so I'll pick up some of that, change the oil, clear the CE codes and see how it performs after that.
 

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I wouldn't run a 15W oil in an engine designed after about 1990 that is started below 40F. The cold viscosity of the oil is just too different (nearly twice as viscous at 5 deg C) compared to the 5W-30 the engine was likely designed around. Also, I'd idle the engine for a minute or two to get that thicker oil pumped around the cold engine before driving off if using such an oil.
 

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There is a TSB from Toyota on 05-11 2GR vehicles for having stuck or sticking OCVs.

I would recommend cleaning the OCV filters to make sure there is no debris present, unfortunately, these valves are very sensitive to pressure and debris.
 

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OCV??
 

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Oh sorry, Oil Control Valve which is Toyota's terminology, Lotus calls it the VVT Control Valve. It's the valve that controls the oil flow for the VVTi gear to advance/retard the cam timing.

They have a small mesh screen filter that catches debris, or in cars with less than stellar oil changes plugged up with sludge preventing the VVTi gear from operating properly.
 

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OCV.

Interesting point. I have never considered changing those. I see that they are shown as being accessible on the top of the cam covers. Has anyone sourced these or had them changed as part of a regular service?
 

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Learned something today. Thank you!
 

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Here's one of the Toyota TSBs that I could locate relating to the OCVs. Seems they changed the parts at some point, so it's hard to know if the 2GRs we use have updated OCVs or the older ones.
 

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Thanks. Seems to be pre 2008 so hopefully doesn't affect our engines. It would still be worth checking and cleaning though, at intervals.
 

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They rarely fail, but like I mentioned they are sensitive to debris. Luckily, they are 12v actuated, so to clean/test them you just hook it to a power supply or 9v battery.

The best way to clean them is to get a cup of fresh oil, set the spool portion of the valve in the oil and apply power to the terminals, cycling it quickly. The stuck spool will break free and be happy again. The filters don't need to be changed either, they are easy to blow out with a shop hose. This is a 10 minute job on N/A cars, but it's a bit messy since oil will go all over.
 

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Thanks. Seems to be pre 2008 so hopefully doesn't affect our engines. It would still be worth checking and cleaning though, at intervals.
Lotus does not have the latest engines
 

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Lotus does not have the latest engines
I need to check my engine serial number on the E400 to see when/where it was made.

On my 2010MY Evora, it was built in 2010 and came out of the Kyushu plant in Japan.

I believe that all 2GR-FEs got some of the updates from 2GR-FKS (like beehive valve springs) when the main engine lines transferred over to the FKS engine.

Next time I'm under my car, I'll grab the serial and see what I can find out.
 

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I struggled with this P0014 code on a MY '10 which had a lot of motor work done (including head replacement) before I got the car. Once the check engine light would come on, the car wouldn't rev over 4500 rpm - a little awkward if I didn't see it before deciding to pass someone on a short stretch of 2-lane.
As you can see on Julian's post, the P0014 is specific to the exhaust cam in Bank 1 - that's the side nearest to the back of the car, and easiest access. There is a sensor that READS the cam position, not too expensive and easily accessible, that comes into play here, too. If your oil is correct, and the actuators look clean, you might want to test or replace that sensor.
I found that the two exhaust actuators look the same, but the intakes are different, and in the process of trouble shooting, I swapped the Bank 1 actuator with the Bank 2 actuator to see if the problem stayed with the cam or the actuator. Oddly, the problem went away and never came back!
I don't know if the actuators are specific to the Banks, but in my case, (if they are-I kind of doubt it) they could've been put in the wrong place with all the motor work done. And of course, if your motor hasn't had any work done, this isn't very helpful!
It might be more helpful to troubleshoot if we think of what's going on:

The ECU reads RPM and throttle position (or probably MAP) and determines when to send a signal to the actuator.
The actuator is a solenoid, which, when activated, opens a pathway for the oil to get to a set of vanes at the end of the cam and rotate it forward.
No signal - the pathway is closed, no oil is applying pressure to the vane, and the cam is at it's normal position.
ECU signal - the pathway opens, and pressurized oil rotates the cam to an advanced position.
The actuator is either open or closed, no in between.
The cam sensor reads the position of the cam and sends it back to the ECU, closing the loop.

When you get a P0014 code, the cam sensor did not send the correct, or expected, response signal to the ECU after the ECU either sent voltage to the solenoid (cam not advancing), or after the signal stopped (cam stuck in the advanced position).

Using this model, you might be able to isolate what makes more sense: oil, actuator solenoid, ECU, or feedback sensor. Hope this helps! And you fellow techy types, if I missed anything or there's more to add, chime in!
 
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