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Discussion Starter #1

HUH? how is this thing shifting so quick? anyone know this car?
 

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LMGTFY, it appears that this guy tunes cars, and he has probably tuned this Evora.

Regular automatic transmissions can shift very quickly, but they can make the engagement harsh by doing so, increasing wear on other components. (ie: engine mounts)

"Slow" shifting transmissions (aka: slushboxes) delay the clutch engagement timing by increasing the amount of time the clutch piston has to fill up to smooth out the shift. In contrast, by decreasing or flat out removing the piston fill timing, it will shorten the shift timing and produce a firmer shift.
 

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While I'm not currently a customer and don't even own an IPS Evora, I do know that BOE has cooked up a good combination of orifice modifications and PCM shift tuning that results in shifts about as fast as is safe for the transmission. Be wary of amateur transmission tuners - many fail to understand the interplay between the hydraulic controls inside the transmission and the PCM's shift modulation tables and try to do everything with one or the other resulting in...unhealthy outcomes.

I've done similar things for other automatic trans cars. There's always a tradeoff between shift harshness and shift speed, and this is exacerbated by a lighter vehicle with a more powerful engine. I've set up nearly racecar aggro shifts on 1-2 and 2-direct in my Grand Marquis tow car (my wife's DD) because 4400+ lbs soaks up a lot of driveline shock from a harsh shift. An Evora, by comparison, is going to be very touchy to more aggressive shift programming. The good news is that once you figure out what a good orifice, accumulator spring and pump pressure setting is to get your fastest desired shift, the rest is just adjusting table values to make it comfortable to live with when you're loafing around town.

Slush-box shifts are actually even worse than they seem - not only do they heat and wear the clutch on the engaging gear, they also cause more wear on the releasing gear's clutch/band, because the transmission is effectively in two gears for several milliseconds during every shift. If you want to know what a pure release-and-engage shift feels like, take a ride in a 5+ ton delivery truck with an automatic, especially when it's empty. They're pretty harsh, but they get long life out of the transmission while doing a lot more work than car and light truck transmissions do.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
BOE has yet to upload any videos of their kit, that beeping is most likely some type of tuning platform alerting for shift points... I would just love to know the mods here.
 

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I think there's a member here that has the BOE kit, but I want to say he put his car into winter storage. @ShadowWulf369 if memory serves me correctly.
You are correct on both. I had my MY13 NA fitted with the TEK over the summer, but my transmission filter was defective after the install, causing me issues. I didn’t get a chance to try the transmission on a good back road before the filter really caused my CEL, but it was definitely faster shifting in a straight line. My shifts weren’t ever jarring that I noticed. I had the filter replaced just days before putting the car away for storage. I’ll be giving it some very thorough testing in the Smokey mountains next spring!

As for the beeping in that video, it sure sounds like some sort of track logger to me. The first beep seems to happen at 60 mph and the two beeps happen at 100. But that’s just a guess. Next spring, I’ll try to take a video of how my car shifts in a straight line. I wouldn’t have a video of my car stock for comparison, so someone else would need to film their car for comparison.
 
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