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Discussion Starter #1
Need some more camber up front. Unfortunately the offset of the wheels are so great that I'm rubbing the outer fender lip. Right now I've just raised the front but that's killing the handling of the car.

Have the V2 arms, and have around 2.3-2.5 degrees negative camber now, need closer to 2.5-3.5. Can I pull the arms, mill them and shorten the bolts, or do I need to pull the whole front suspension apart and get the uprights milled somewhere
 

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I would go with the upright milling as it doesn't take away any strength, no telling how strong the arms would be with the material missing.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I would go with the upright milling as it doesn't take away any strength, no telling how strong the arms would be with the material missing.
How about milling the stock arms, and putting them back on. Again trying to get to -3
 

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How about milling the stock arms, and putting them back on. Again trying to get to -3
The thing is theres no way to know withuout modeling them or testing, but I assume that if the V2 arms could be smaller they would have been and that probably applies to the stock ones as well. Whereas there is no* chance to make the upright too weak.
 

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I agree with Kevin entirely. It might be ok to take off some material on the stock arms, but you'll take off a significant amount getting to -3*. It would also be a good assumption to believe that if the V2 arms could be smaller, they would be.

Do it right, mill the upright.
 

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As others have said, I would recommend removal of material from the V2 arms. They already shift the balljoint centerline by ~5.5mm... which would be like removing 5.5mm from your stock arms (which was my solution vs. buying V2 arms).

Here are some additional dimensions for V2 arms I modeled.

 

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Discussion Starter #7
how can we say the same thing about the uprights though? I see the case for not removing material from the arms, but the uprights being what we're threading into, aren't we just creating another weak link?
For those that have milled the uprights, how much did you take off?

4MM approx will get me another degree, so I'll be around 3.3-3.7 negative based on that math with no shims. Prob add a a couple shims back in to get around -3 - 3.25
 

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how can we say the same thing about the uprights though? I see the case for not removing material from the arms, but the uprights being what we're threading into, aren't we just creating another weak link?
For those that have milled the uprights, how much did you take off?

4MM approx will get me another degree, so I'll be around 3.3-3.7 negative based on that math with no shims. Prob add a a couple shims back in to get around -3 - 3.25
I did on my V2. Took off .100 but didn't mill straight across. Just enough to mate flush. The down side is you can't slip in a shim but I wasn't planning on it anyway.
In the end my negative camber after milling was -3.3
 

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How about milling the stock arms, and putting them back on. Again trying to get to -3
I took off .080 on the stock arms and yielded -2.2 not what I was hoping for and didn't want to take off anymore material so went with the V2 and was disappointed that I only could get -2.5 from the V2 arms; hence the reason for milling them .100 btw - that's the most I would mill them.
 

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I made an assumption - that it was more dangerous to remove material from an aluminum part designed specifically for the lotus, than a steel part that was likely for some other car much heavier than the lotus. AND I asked Ralph, who said he made the part as small as possible and modeled the expected forces in a simulator program.
 

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I've seen a V2 arm get torn up. To be fair, it was due to a crash.
While milling the side of it won't significantly degrade strength, I think I will opt to mill the upright.
I might even consider going with aftermarket uprights, but I haven't bothered looking at the specs, but it might be of interest to you.
 

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Milling the arms with no modeling is 100% making them weaker. If that is OK noone can say.

Milling the upright just reduces the number of threads, but only by ~1 and there are still more then a diamater worth. You are not reducing the thickness in the weakest part of the upright.
 

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I might even consider going with aftermarket uprights, but I haven't bothered looking at the specs, but it might be of interest to you.
The EliseParts race uprights effectively shift the steering arm mounting plane 7mm, which should allow for up to about -3.0 degrees of camber with stock arms and in excess of -4.5 degrees with V2 arms.

Also, the stock knuckles have a significant amount of material that could be removed from the steering arm interface before strength would come into question. Like the stock steering arms, they're made from forged steel.

 

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The EliseParts race uprights effectively shift the steering arm mounting plane 7mm, which should allow for up to about -3.0 degrees of camber with stock arms and in excess of -4.5 degrees with V2 arms.
EliseParts race uprights were something I considered but wasn't sure at the time thinking I wouldn't have to mill much from the OEM arms and when I went with V2 arms, I was under the impression I could achieve at least -3 without milling. Looking at it now, I would lean towards this solution along with the stock non milled steering arms.
Live and learn
 
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