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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi.
I just let the car idle the longest time Ive had her.
The temp. Went up to about 102!
The fan faillight was a bit intemittent.
The temp did climb to 103.
I shut it down.
Whats up? ?............Please., besides a relay?
 

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Hi.
[snip] Went up to about 102!
The fan faillight was a bit intemittent.
[snip]
Check the connector to the fan - my OEM connectors seem pretty lame as far as weather-sealing. You may have a corroded power jack on the fan.

Definitely the correct thing to shut it down ASAP - you don't want to over heat and hurt your cylinder hylomar seals ($$$).

But it may be worse - just idling should not invoke the fans unless it's really hot or really LONG? What you do you mean by LONG idle? My 88 will get to 92C (fan activation) in about 10 mins idling from a cold start and ambient 70F.
 

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You can both hear and see the fans come on and watch the temp go down as they kick in. The temp gauge is sometimes a little off compared to what the computer is reading for temp, but you should never see a warning light unless there is a problem.
When AC is on fans, should be on irregardless.

So if your fans are not coming on and you are getting too hot you have a problem with the fan circuit.
If the fans are coming on, but the temp stays too hot, there is a problem with the cooling system or thermostat.

Randy
 

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If getting that hot simply idling, no driving prior and just idling.. and outside temps not crazy high..

If so maybe low on coolant?
 

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Wingless Wonder
1988 Esprit Turbo
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The fan faillight was a bit intemittent.
The temp did climb to 103.

Whats up? ?............Please., besides a relay?
It COULD be a relay. Be aware that the fan relays are a high-amperage circuit, so you can't just swap the relays around. So look in the Lotus parts list, either get the proper one from JAE etc, or be mindful of the amp specs on the relay case.


Look for signs of melted connectors in the relay sockets when you remove the relays.



Finally, crawl under the rad area and give the fan blades a spin. All should be equally "free". A "tight" fan might draw more current.

As Randy said, you can easily look at the fans to verify that all three are operating. Just turn on the A/C, the fans will run when the compressor is engaged.
 

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Always check the basics and easy stuff first...have you looked underneath to see if the fans are coming on? Do you have sufficient coolant?

Roy
 

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Ditto what carbuff said, I had a relay socket burn a connector under the relay housing in the front compartment. Fixed it, problem solved, FAN FAIL was coming on once in a while when the gauge climbed. I first messed with the "otter" switches, but that wasnt my issue, I would not recommend messing with the "otter" switches without metering them for continuity first as I learned they are directly in the water circuit with a gasket and all, not just strapped to the pipe as I thought they were, I have an 88 though, 89 might not even have "otter" switches on the cooling lines in the front pass side of the engine bay. They are not the easiest thing to get to if I remember correctly.
 

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103 C is not melt-down, or warp-the-head hot. No need to panic. It's hotter than the system should run if all was well, but it's no need to panic.

*~*~*
The "Fan Fail" light's name is mis-leading since it has nothing to do with an actual failure of the fan. It's really a Relay Fail light. The circuit looks for voltage before and after the fan relay. Either the Otter switch, or the A/C switching on will result in 12 volts going to the 'upstream' side of the relay. If the relay works, then 12 volts will appear 'downstream' of the relay, and the Fan Fail light does not illuminate. If 12 volts does not appear 'downstream' of the relay, then the relay has failed to switch on and the Fan Fail light illuminates.

That's all it means, and it has nothing to do with the fans. The fan motor can become disconnected, or fry, or just fall out of the bottom of the car. As long as there's 12 volts 'downstream' of the relay, the circuit is happy and hasn't got a clue what's going on at the fan itself. Even if the Fan Fail light isn't indicating a problem, make a point of periodically checking out the fans.

A flickering Fan Fail light indicates the relay's internal contacts may be marginal, or the continuity between the relay and socket, or socket and wiring terminals may be poor.

*~*~*
For the socket and wiring terminals, try treating them with Pacer Technologies "Rail Zip II". It's available at hobby shops that cater to the model train crowd. It may be in the train section, or it may be in the glue section with the other Pacer products... ZAP super glues.

The train guys use it to wipe the brass rails to remove all oxidation and optimize continuity. Just apply a little to both sides of the connection, then plug it together. No need to work the connector back and forth (although, it wouldn't hurt). Just apply the Rail Zip II and leave it to do it's thing.

*~*~*
The relay is a high current, 70 amp unit for which you won't find replacements readily available at every boutique parts store. Most common HD relays are about 30 amps, some are 50 if you shop around. 70 amp will be harder to find, so you may as well just contact a Lotus vendor.

*~*~*
Get under the car while the fans are running and check that all three are running. If the relay works, and the Fan Fail light doesn't switch on, there can still be one or more fans not working. With less than all three running, the coolant temp may creep up when the car is just sitting, idling... ie, no ram airflow through the radiator inlet.

Each fan motor is individually grounded. If all else in the circuit is good, but the fan isn't running, then it's not uncommon for the ground connection to be corroded and not making connection. Clean all the grounds with a wire brush, maybe even use some Rail Zip II. But for re-assembly, I've found it helpful to coat the chassis ground point, the terminal, and nut & bolt with Anti-Seize.

Regards,
Tim Engel
 

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103 C is not melt-down, or warp-the-head hot. No need to panic. It's hotter than the system should run if all was well, but it's no need to panic.

*~*~*
The Fan Fail light is mis-leading since it has nothing to do with an actual failure of the fan. It's really a Relay Fail light. The circuit looks for voltage before and after the fan relay. Either the Otter switch, or the A/C switching on will result in 12 volts going to the 'upstream' side of the relay. If the relay works, then 12 volts will appear 'downstream' of the relay, and the Fan Fail light does not illuminate. If 12 volts does not appear 'downstream' of the relay, then the relay has failed to switch on and the Fan Fail light illuminates.

That's all it means, and it has nothing to do with the fans. The fan motor can become disconnected, or fry, or just fall out of the bottom of the car. As long as there's 12 volts 'downstream' of the relay, the circuit is happy and hasn't got a clue what's going on at the fan itself.

A flickering Fan Fail light indicates the relay's internal contacts may be marginal, or the continuity between the relay and socket, or socket and wiring terminals may be poor.

*~*~*
For the socket and wiring terminals, try treating them with Pacer Technologies "Rail Zip II". It's available at hobby shops that cater to the model train crowd. It may be in the train section, or it may be in the glue section with the other Pacer products... ZAP super glues.

The train guys use it to wipe the brass rails to remove all oxidation and optimize continuity. Just apply a little to both sides of the connection, then plug it together. No need to work the connector back and forth (although, it wouldn't hurt). Just apply the Rail Zip II and leave it to do it's thing.

*~*~*
The relay is a high current, 70 amp unit that you won't find replacements readily available at every boutique parts store. Most common HD relays are about 30 amps, some are 50 if you shop around. 70 amp will be harder to find, so you may as well just contact a Lotus vendor.

*~*~*
Get under the car while the fans are running and check that all three are running. If the relay works, and the Fan Fail light doesn't switch on, there can still be one or more fans not working. With less than all three running, the coolant temp may creep up when the car is just sitting, idling... ie, no ram airflow through the radiator inlet.

Each fan motor is individually grounded. If all else in the circuit is good, but the fan isn't running, then it's not uncommon for the ground connection to be corroded and not making connection. Clean all the grounds with a wire brush, maybe even uses some Rail Zip II. But for re-assembly, I've found it helpful to coat chassis ground point, the terminal, and nut & bolt with Anti-Seize.

Regards,
Tim Engel
^^that is why this forum is an amazing place! Plus the countless number of others that take the time to provide this type of otherwise unobtainable information...thank you!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks ALL for that information.
I keep blowing the same 2 out of 3 10Amp. fuses.!!
Theres a short somewhere but where could it be?
 

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Thanks ALL for that information.
I keep blowing the same 2 out of 3 10Amp. fuses.!!
Theres a short somewhere but where could it be?
Please post results of other questions, i.e.

are fans turning on?

Are ALL fans turning on?

If not did you check the fan for freeplay, etc.,etc
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I will.
Thank You
 

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I keep blowing the same 2 out of 3 10Amp. fuses.!!
Theres a short somewhere but where could it be?
It doesn't have to be a short circuit in order to blow a fuse. It could be bad/ stiff bushings in the motors, or something binding against the blades. Anything that will slow the motor will also cause the current to increase, quite possibly to a level that can blow a fuse.

It could be a short... I'm not saying it isn't possible. Trace the wiring looking for any bad spots in the insulation. But a short in a 12 volt power feed would likely lead to melted wires, a general loss of Lucas Smoke, and an acrid stink you can track with your nose.

Keep an open mind about possibilities other than a short.

Regards,
Tim Engel
 

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There's a short somewhere but where could it be?


A good place to start checking are the wiring runs that go near each fan.

These are cable-tied to the metal fan supports which have sharp edges!

I'd cut ALL the cable ties down there, inspect the wires for chafing, wrap with electrical tape, and re-attach with cable ties that are just snug enough to allow movement of the wires. (I did that on my own car just as G.P. when I had the rad out in 2005) :up:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
If getting that hot simply idling, no driving prior and just idling.. and outside temps not crazy high..

If so maybe low on coolant?
I was low on coolant so a gave the car a drink.
Damn. Still blowing fuses........All these fuses are going to break me.
 

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Wingless Wonder
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All these fuses are going to break me.
Most auto parts stores sell circuit breakers that fit into the fuse holders....a perfect tool for problems like that. :cool:
 

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It doesn't have to be a short circuit in order to blow a fuse. It could be bad/ stiff bushings in the motors, or something binding against the blades. Anything that will slow the motor will also cause the current to increase, quite possibly to a level that can blow a fuse.
This.

Take the key out of the ignition, get underneath, and examine the fans, turning them by hand. If you encounter any resistance, you likely have a bad fan. Or two.
 

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Agree with Sanj and Tim.

I had a bolt back out of a fan housing, and that kept the blades from spinning. you could also have old dried out grease and now the bearings have too much resistance, causing the current to spike and blow the fuse. That happened to my heater blower fan. The grease was old and felt like glue.
 
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