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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My cat, Touk, got hit by a car (again) last week. :( Fortunately, this time, he wasn't as badly injured - nothing internal - but he's still pretty beat up. His leg got busted and is now wrapped up in a bandage, and he has lots of scrapes and what not.

The problem I'm having is that since Touk got back from the vet, my other cat, Harley, has been hissing at him and acting like he's a strange animal. Is this common? Is it that he's injured or does she not recognize him? Is it something that will pass quickly? Should I separate them to prevent her from attacking him, or should I not be concerned about that?

Thanks. :)
 

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Guessing it's the bandages, other cat thinks wtf is all over him get away, get away from me, prbly get used to it fast, maybe put their food dishes closer forcing the other cat to cope or not eat !
 

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Touk might just smell different due to medications (is that possible?) or the cast, probably nothing to worry about as if that's the case it should work itself out. In the meantime, separate them like you would do if introducing a strange cat to the household.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Touk might just smell different due to medications (is that possible?) or the cast, probably nothing to worry about as if that's the case it should work itself out. In the meantime, separate them like you would do if introducing a strange cat to the household.
Ah, you know, they gave him a flea bath, and he does smell funny. Think that's it?
 

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Hey Steve - keep the cats inside, wouldja? You're very lucky that your cat survived twice.

ed
+1

And don't call him Pinky!
:panic:

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I'd try to keep them apart as much as you can for a little while. Touk has enough stress right now.
 

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Did pinky bite him in the nuts?
 

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OK, so I guess I get to give the definitive answer, since most of the above are just a lot of snotty remarks with a few helpful hints thrown in.
This is a problem I hear from clients all of the time. I'm sure your Veterinarian has heard it, too. The cats at home can tell that Touk isn't himself, both by the way he moves (unusual gait) and by his unusual smell.
You can't really do much about his gait until the leg heals and the wrap comes off, but you can do something about the smell. My suggestion is to put a touch of perfume, aftershave, Vicks Vapo-rub, or any other really smelly stuff on every one of the cats in the house. This way, everyone smells the same.

Other than that, I wouldn't do much else. Touk will just go and find a warm place to recoup, and the other cats will just hiss, but won't do much else. At least this is what usually happens in my 30 years of experience. But as always, YMMV.

Steve
 

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Yes, the cat smells different, and of the vet's office (other cat doesn't like it there, I'd guess), so hissing can occur, but normally only for a day or two.

You, your cat have my best wishes for a return to normalcy.

But, I am compelled to mention that no cats should be let outdoors. As mentioned on prev threads:

Cats that live both in and outdoors have about 1/2 the life expectancy of indoor cats. (cat that live only o/s, about 1/4.) Due to predators, poisons - on lawns, in garages for rodents, etc - and CARS.

Also, studies show they do a lot of environmental damage: dead birds, snakes, etc. A British study req'd the 100 participants to put everything the cat brought home in freezer packs, which were picked up monthly.

The number of dead creatures was astonishing. Fleas brought into homes weren't counted.

Please consider this. (No, your cats won't be unhappy and/or will get over it. They always do.)
 

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OK, so I guess I get to give the definitive answer, since most of the above are just a lot of snotty remarks with a few helpful hints thrown in.
If transio came here expecting anything else, he came to the wrong place.
:p
 

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No cat should be locked up in a house, or apartment. Don’t get one if that’s what you are going to do to it. Cats are supposed to wander and hunt (rats, mice, gophers, birds….) I can see bringing them in at night if you have coyotes around but that’s about it. I had a few cats, all came and went at will, a few lived past 18 years. I don’t have any pets now for I don’t have the time or room for one.

As for what you have going on, the hissy one will get over it. I’m guessing it’s female, my experience is male cats tend to be more friendly.

Kevin
 

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No cat should be locked up in a house, or apartment. Don’t get one if that’s what you are going to do to it. Cats are supposed to wander and hunt (rats, mice, gophers, birds….) I can see bringing them in at night if you have coyotes around but that’s about it. I had a few cats, all came and went at will, a few lived past 18 years. I don’t have any pets now for I don’t have the time or room for one.

As for what you have going on, the hissy one will get over it. I’m guessing it’s female, my experience is male cats tend to be more friendly.

Kevin
K -

This is exactly how I felt, until my cat got hit by a car (twice). They were just as happy indoors, especially when I moved to where we had a screened-in porch (note, not Porsche).

In urban/suburban areas, it's not safe for them, as they'll eat the poisons that people use for rodents, lick anti-freeze, pick up poisons from lawns, etc.

To your other point: I did not want them killing birds, rabbits, etc. They can also p/u diseases, fleas, ticks, etc from mice and rats.
 

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I have spoken with several veterarinarians and they all agree that it is not cruel to make them indoor cats(easier to do this from the start than try to convert them later). What some others in this thread have said is true- indoor cats have a much longer life span. They will be happy indoors as long as you provide them some plants to chew on from time to time, toys they can "stalk", and play with and give them excercise on a regular basis. I know- I have been razzed by by friends for having a strictly housecat. They think it's cruel. What is cruel is subjecting them to cars, predators, diseases,etc.
It is hard to convert a cat that has previously been outside! My cat has never been outside and acts like she does not know it exists. Cats that have previously been outside will yowl at the door and try to slip our every chance they can. It is best to keep them inside from the start!! As for Steve's cat, Touk, if that cat has been hit by a car twice - he obviously hasn't learned that cars are dangerous- Steve needs to keep that cat inside if he wants to prolong the cat's life.
 
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