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bluejae said:
wait... it's that easy? that's like one step less than an oil change...

i thought i read a run-through and it sounded a little more difficult than that
Bluejae,
Yep, it's exactly that easy. I agree completely with Tim M on this one, including the estimate of draining 99% of the oil just by letting gravity and time work their magic. I would add that it is better to drain the oil while warm (so the contaminants stay suspended, and the volume of the remaining oil film in the trans is less). And note that the position of the drain plug on the front of the trans nearly guarantees that the oil will completely drain, especially if ramps are used under the rear wheels.
Jim
 

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bluejae said:
wait... it's that easy? that's like one step less than an oil change...
It's pretty simple. As stated above, get it warm so things flow better and the "junk" is more suppended in the oil (just like you should do for engine oil changes).
  • Back the car up on ramps (or put it up on jackstands).
  • Remove the under-tray.
  • Loosen the fill plug. *
  • Remove the drain plug.
  • Let drain.
  • Replace drain plug (use a new gasket/crush washer or just flip the old one over).
  • Remove the fill plug.
  • Re-fill the transmission - this can be the problem as you can't just pour the new gear oil into the hole on the side of the transmission. You either need to use a pump (relatively cheap, but slow) or figure out how to use a hose from above to pour the new gear oil in. The trans is full when the new gear oil starts flowing back out the fill hole (you've filled it to the level of the hole).
  • Replace the fill plug.
  • Replace the under-tray.
  • Drive off the ramps.
* Always loosen the fill plug before you pull the drain plug. Sometimes, people find that the fill plug is on too tight and they can't get it loose. Unfortunately, if you discover this after you have drained the gear oil, it's much harder to take it to a shop with the proper tools to loosen the stuck plug.

It's similar to changing the engine oil, except that you don't have to deal with a filter...;)
 

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Don't over-tighten the plug. I believe the manual
calls for a torque setting of '24'. I can verify that
if you don't use additionalk fluid to get out all the
old fluid, a fair amount will remain. You see, when
I first got the car I added Motor Silk's Trany treatment
and that stuff makes the fluid white-ish. Simply
draining it, doesn't get it all out but if you use a
quart or so of 'extra' new fluid, once that has gone
in and out, the fluid is running clear. Since the system
takes 2.4 quarts, you might as well use the approximate
1/2 quart left over to run through the system. You're
not going to have any need for saving it.
 

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Ridgemanron said:
I can verify that if you don't use additional fluid to get out all the old fluid, a fair amount will remain.
I haven't changed the gear oil in my Elise yet, but using the Miata as a typical example, the transmission holds a tad bit over 2 quarts. After draining, you can put back in 2 oz. less than the "dry" capacity. 2 oz. out of 2 quarts is nothing - that amount won't hurt anything and doesn't need "flushing". Also, consider that the vast majority of cars out there never get their gear oil changed, and yet still manage to last a couple of hundred thousand miles.

But if you want to drain, refill, drain again, and refill again - go ahead. It won't hurt anything but your wallet.
 

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TimMullen said:
I haven't changed the gear oil in my Elise yet, but using the Miata as a typical example, the transmission holds a tad bit over 2 quarts. After draining, you can put back in 2 oz. less than the "dry" capacity. 2 oz. out of 2 quarts is nothing - that amount won't hurt anything and doesn't need "flushing". Also, consider that the vast majority of cars out there never get their gear oil changed, and yet still manage to last a couple of hundred thousand miles.

But if you want to drain, refill, drain again, and refill again - go ahead. It won't hurt anything but your wallet.
The Elise takes 2.4 quarts and unless you know how
to buy Trany fluid that matches this exact amount
of fluid, you'r going to have 0.6 quarts left over.
How does using that amount, which you will no longer
have any use for, affect anyone's wallet? As far as cars
having never had their gear oil changed over a lifetime
that can reach 'a couple of hundred thousand miles', why
then does Lotus tell you to change it at 45,000 miles?
Newer fluid works better in the abraisive, high temperature
environment it is subjected to, than older fluid. And I
repeat that simple draining leaves old fluid in the trany
which costs you nothing extra to extricate, using the
'left over' new fluid from the three quarts you have to buy
anyway. But if you like leaving fluid in for hundreds of
thousands of miles, which flys in the face of what Lotus
recommends, go ahead.
 

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Ridgemanron said:
The Elise takes 2.4 quarts and unless you know how
to buy Trany fluid that matches this exact amount
of fluid, you'r going to have 0.6 quarts left over.
How does using that amount, which you will no longer
have any use for, affect anyone's wallet? As far as cars
having never had their gear oil changed over a lifetime
that can reach 'a couple of hundred thousand miles', why
then does Lotus tell you to change it at 45,000 miles?
Newer fluid works better in the abraisive, high temperature
environment it is subjected to, than older fluid. And I
repeat that simple draining leaves old fluid in the trany
which costs you nothing extra to extricate, using the
'left over' new fluid from the three quarts you have to buy
anyway. But if you like leaving fluid in for hundreds of
thousands of miles, which flys in the face of what Lotus
recommends, go ahead.
:wallbang:

Every manufacturer recommends that the fluid should be changed. The point was that almost no one does it. I never said it's not a good idea, and yes, I do change the gear oil in my transmissions.

As for that whole 0.6 quarts of oil... Pouring it in the transmission and draining it out the other end isn't going to do much "flushing". It will pour in the fill hole, down the side of the transmission, and out the drain. It will not touch 99% of the surfaces (containing the old gear oil) in the transmission.

Like I said, if it makes you feel good, go for it. It won't make any measurable difference, but it certainly isn't going to hurt.

Oh, that 0.6 quart left over becomes a bit more than 1 quart after the next gear oil change. For the third gear oil change, you only need to buy one quart. Or, just maybe, you may have more than one car that needs periodic changes.

Now, most people buy engine oil by the 6 quart case. The engine only takes 5 quarts, so I guess we should all just pour that remaining quart down the engine and out the drain "just in case"???
 

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As stated previously. Simple draining of the trany did not
get out all the old trany fluid, but by pumping in some
'extra' new fluid, it did. Then again, I prefer getting as
much of the old fluid out whereas you don't. If you're
so worried about saving .06 of a quart of gear lube and
prefer the trade-off of keeping some old fluid in your
trany, I say 'go for it!' P.S. - I guess you don't agree
with Lotus about using a torque setting of '24' when
tightening the entry/exit 'screw on ' bolt, since you
didn't care to mention it. I also have .03 of a quart of
Castrol 5W-40, which you can have after my next oil
change.
 

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Discussion Starter #28 (Edited)
The torque should be at 29 ft-lbs for both the drain and fill plug, the metal washers are so cheap, like $1 something so why not get a few new and put aside?

Yeah, I just drained mine too. I did not flush or any thing like that. Use a 6 point socket or the box end of a wrench on fill and drain plugs and you'll be able to get these plugs off. They should come off easily.

In Addition: Here's a 'tool' you can make yourself to get the gear oil into the fill plug hole:
You'll need a hot gun glue and a plastic hose about 18 inches in length is perfect:

Cut the tip off of a gear lube bottle, push the hose over the end and hot glue the hose. Make sure you get the glue all the way around generously so there are no leaks.

This will let you hold the bottle with this on the end and insert the other into the fill hole - now just squeeze the bottle. A good amount will flow into the trans. Mine took about 2.3 quarts and then it came spilling out signalling that the trans was full. :) Be ready with your fill plug when this happens so you can minimize the amount that comes spilling back out.


Hope this helps.
 

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In a manual transmission, the problem is not so much
the fluid degradation, but rather fluid contamination.
This contamination occurs over time as the syncronizers,
bearings and gears in the transmission wear out. The
resulting metal particles then float around in the lubricant.
Oil with microscopic particles of metal in it does not lubricate
as well as clean oil. So if these contaminates are not drained
out, they will shorten the life of your transmission.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Desperado said:
Anyone have the Toyo part number for the trans drain/fill crush washers ?

Thanks
Got mine direct from a Toyota Dealership
Part # is 90430-18008 decsription says 'Gasket'
They should be metal washers, silver in color. See post #1 pic #4.
Price was $2.14 each. You can probably get it cheaper somewhere else. Libertyville Toyota tends to be pricey for parts.
You can ask for a 2005 Celica GTS Transmission's drain and fill plug gaskets and get these.
 

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Manual tranny oil takes SUCH a small amount of abuse (no heat, no chemicals, very little friction, etc) and it's so durable (given its viscosity, especially synthetics) that I think changing it more than factory recommendations is a waste of resources. The plug magnet picks up all the metal too.
 

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R'elise Me said:
Manual tranny oil takes SUCH a small amount of abuse (no heat, no chemicals, very little friction, etc) and it's so durable (given its viscosity, especially synthetics) that I think changing it more than factory recommendations is a waste of resources. The plug magnet picks up all the metal too.
Glen,

I don't believe that the Elise/Exige comes with synthetic tranny oil as the factory fill. When I had it changed on my first Elise at 6K miles, it looked very dirty. -eek-
 

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Jack said:
Glen,

I don't believe that the Elise/Exige comes with synthetic tranny oil as the factory fill. When I had it changed on my first Elise at 6K miles, it looked very dirty. -eek-
Jack,
I agree -- the original trans oil smells exactly like petroleum-based gear oil, and synthetic does not have the same aroma at all. Not very scientific, but I'll bet it's right. Also, the specs in the maintenance table in the owners manual will almost certainly indicate a non-synthetic lube.
Jim
 

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Just changed my trans fluid. Replaced stock with Redline 75W-90NS (GL-5). Works great. Might be slightly smoother than stock but it's hard to tell with certainty.

2006 Elise Sport #46
 

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I think you should use GL-4 instead of 5
 

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kortik said:
I think you should use GL-4 instead of 5
The Service Manual indicates GL-4 or GL-5. :shrug:
 
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