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The first link is to the announcement of a ride-sharing service to be launched by Daimler and Geely.

https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/daimler-mobility-ag-and-geely-technology-group-inaugurate-starrides-premium-ride-hailing-service-in-hangzhou-300967809.html

The second is to a C&D article highlighting a new (June) AMG engine.


The third links to info on the Toyota engine family powering, among other cars, the Evora.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_GR_engine#2GR-FE

Note that the weight of these two engines is very similar, as is the HP, but the torque is substantially better.

Why not in a future Lotus?
 

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Lotus's decision process for finding a replacement for the Rover 1.8L K series engine seems to have focused on a) packaging requirements (which was a pretty low bar to hit - the engine bay volume in the Elige will swallow a lot of <2.5L four cyl transverse FWD drivelines), and b) power/weight ratio - the Rover K is an all-alloy engine, and the driveline weight quoted is 287 lbs. The NA 1.8 Toyota plus transaxle makes 60 more HP in about the same package.

Once they'd established the relationship with Toyota, that led to the use of the GR engine in the Evora. Toyota's newer engines are all focused around better specific output and higher thermal efficiency, so tend to be direct injection with more bore than stroke - not a sports car engine by default. The GR engine is aging, and Toyota hasn't used the short-stroke (high revving) 2GR-FE variant of it anywhere in some time. The 359 lb service weight of the lump (not including transaxle) does seem to offer incentive to go to a smaller block with more (turbo)supercharging to get the power desired if it can be pulled off.

That said, Geely is already making a 2L aluminum turbo four for use in Volvos. Unless they want to adopt the AMG engine everywhere in place of their own design (doubtful) I would not expect them to spend the money to license its use just for Lotus.

But their own engine isn't way behind the curve, and being able to put 'Lotus Performance' on engines in the Volvo S model might be enough volume to justify a real high-po project based around their existing engine or its next generation. The Lotus would get the optimized variant, and the son-of S60 would get something a little mellower but still lots perkier than the 250 HP engine they are using now.

At the moment, it looks like everybody is getting peak performance with electric motor AWD and a hybrid battery pack addition, as in the Volvo S60 T8 AWD R-Design (400 HP in this combination). It should be possible to package such a driveline into a monocoque tub in a way that promotes good handling and would also provide a sellable relationship to the Evija halo car.
 

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My 2.0 in my Stelvio is tuned to 390/443 well below the in house testing on the motor which has internals set for well north of 400 HP. So in reality, easily achieved numbers. Notice my vast advantage in torque!! This 2.0 Multi Air motor is what we really want!!
The Volvo motor is not really that impressive AT ALL!!!
 

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Yes, I'm very familiar with the multi-air family. It's a clever design that actually seems to work just as well as its press suggests: the turbo 1.3 in the 500 Abarth and 124 Spider is good for 250 HP, and the turbo 2.0 (Alfa engine, like you've got) is good for 400 with some careful tuning. Adopting full variable valve timing and lift (as multi air has) would do the trick nicely if the internals of the engine are up to the job. I haven't seen the insides of the Geely/Volvo 2.0 to know how stout it is - if they sized bore spacing for packaging instead of performance they may not be able to girdle the crank enough to stand lots of boost regardless of what the head can do.
 
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