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Plug Whisperer
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Discussion Starter #1
We've been largely replacing the front coolers with a rear mounted unit.

However, if you're an avid DIY'er and want to do this project on the cheap, you can. We've done it as well...

I put together a simple guide along with where to get quality parts here. Just click the pic:D



Cheers,

Phil
 

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Very nice Phil! Do the newer cars still have the short fittings? I'm asking because I haven't looked under there yet and would like to know if the long fitting upgrade is applicable for me too. I would do this if I had the short fittings...

Do the oil hoses have a steel braid in them or just a glass braid? If there is no steel, then just a raizorblade would cut the hose...

Just to confirm the P/Ns and material…these must be the steel fittings and not the aluminum ones…
The 4 steel 90-degree 5/8 BSP to 5/8 hose barb fittings P/N is BS1090
The 2 steel 45 degree 5/8 BSP to 5/8 hose barb fittings P/N is BS1045
 

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Plug Whisperer
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Discussion Starter #3
By short fittings, do you mean the hard 90s? If so, yes as far as I know. I haven't looked real close at a 2011 car though... They're still under warranty, which means they typically stay slow until warranty is over or close to it ;)

Theory is that the newer cars have better crimps, ie Lotus hose maker set the crimping tool a notch or two tighter;)

I do prefer the steel fittings for this application just because they're more durable for repeat service, the aluminum push-locks are nice as well though. I think Kevin's NCI fittings are the aluminum ones--- again, no prob with those. They are a fair bit more expensice, FWIW. The fittings to *avoid* are steel and have very small deformed ribs the tube bend instead of machined barbs. They essentially look like a simple bent tube with a flared end on one end and small deformed ribs for hose retention on the other. Those are designed for a hydraulic sleeve crimps and I would not trust those in any application other than with a hydraulic crimped sleeve.... even still, I'd rather have a push-lock with a clamp any day--- afterall, look at the lotus part! ;) When you call BAT (info in the tutorial I wrote), just order "push-lock" and they will know what you mean. If they're out of the correct style fitting, then wait for the right ones to come in. Don't be in a hurry.

The OE lines do not contain steel, so yes a razor will cut them just fine.

Hope that helps,

Phil
 

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Plug Whisperer
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Discussion Starter #5

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Plug Whisperer
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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Sorry for confusion.

Page 5 of the following PDF... The fittings on the left side of page are the ones to use. The ones on the right are NOT OK...

http://208.109.215.220/files/phosend.pdf

On page 3, you'll find a general product description...

The PDF is only showing the alloy version, but if you call them they'll have the steel version as well...

-PV
 

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Phil,

That is a great write-up. Thanks for doing that!

Are you still selling kits to do the rear oil cooler swap? I am leaning towards this option as it would allow me to change a higher majority of the oil each time.
 

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Phil, I was looking at the oil line fix from RLS but this seems like it would do the job just as well. What does the RLS kit provide that this solution does not?
 

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Phil, I was looking at the oil line fix from RLS but this seems like it would do the job just as well. What does the RLS kit provide that this solution does not?
[STRIKE I don't want to rain on anyone's parade STRIKE], [Edit: I don't mean to distract from the thread,] but I'll answer the question: the RLS kit is pre-assembled using racing grade hoses, fittings and clamps. It is Phil's opinion that the OEM rubber lines are sufficient, we believe that the OEM rubber lines should be replaced with the race grade lines that we supply. We will need to agree to disagree here. If you don't want to invest in replacing all of the lines, Phil offers a more affordable alternative (depending, of course, on shop rates, etc.)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
....I think Kevin's NCI fittings are the aluminum ones--- again, no prob with those. ...
Phil
I don't want to rain on anyone's parade, but I'll answer the question: the RLS kit is pre-assembled using racing grade hoses, fittings and clamps. It is Phil's opinion that the OEM rubber lines are sufficient, we believe that the OEM rubber lines should be replaced with the race grade lines that we supply. We will need to agree to disagree here. If you don't want to invest in replacing all of the lines, Phil offers a more affordable alternative (depending, of course, on shop rates, etc.)
Not Raining on my parade:) I'm also not really "offering" anything in this thread. I recommend plenty of folks to RLS/NCI for oil lines:up: No doubt, they're the best thing going for replacement lines!:clap:

While I think the lines on the car are of fine quality, they're certainly not high end "race grade hoses". As for shop rates, not sure which fix would be cheaper. Not really the point of the thread either.

If I had a nickel for every PM or email I've rec'd about fixing oil line related issues, I'd eat steak dinners for a week for free. There are a host of DIY'ers out there, some cheap [email protected];), and some who just like to take the the long-way 'round that are looking for some guidance with this. I've got inboxes to prove it:eek: This is the cheapest way for the at home wrench to fix all or some of their leaky lines. You want to do it "jam up", then put a cooler in the rear. Next best would be leave the coolers up front and use NCI lines (purchased through RLS), and last is the cheapskate fix and that's just swap the hose ends like I laid out in the tutorial. They're all perfectly acceptable and have pros/cons...

Hope that helps to clear things up...

Phil
 

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.

P.S. Just a little bit of fear mongering: I'm hearing from more and more people including Lotus techs that many times the fittings will be frozen in place (galvanic corrosion), and removal without destroying the oil cooler is not possible in those cases.

My advice would be: if it isn't budging when you try to remove the oil cooler fitting, don't force the issue unless you have a replacement oil cooler on hand.

I know Sector 101 sells a kit, shame that they don't preassemble the fittings.

Your advice to use the Oetiker clamp (as an option) is good: they are cheap insurance, we use them on every fitting. You never know when HOT rubber will go soft, and the Oetiker clamp prevents a catastrophic failure.

[Edit: whoopsie - doodles, 111 not 101]

.
 

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The last concern is legitimate on corrosion. On my race car some of the threads were destroyed. My fix at the time was to weld AN fittings to the stock coolers and make up new oil lines with the newer lightweight AN10 hose (no external braided jacket). The RLS prefab setup looks very nice, but I added an external oil filter and Accusump and check valve to the circuit, so had to go custom.
 

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The last concern is legitimate on corrosion. On my race car some of the threads were destroyed. My fix at the time was to weld AN fittings to the stock coolers and make up new oil lines with the newer lightweight AN10 hose (no external braided jacket). The RLS prefab setup looks very nice, but I added an external oil filter and Accusump and check valve to the circuit, so had to go custom.
We've caught a few near failures when looking over client's cars in our shop before failure but I know of a few examples where people have tried to repair the problem ("people" meaning dealers) and actually had the connections break during repair yet try to install the hoses anyway. The result is catastrophic failures. As Thomas said, if the lines don't easily remove, then you are likely facing corrosion and will need to replace the coolers as well.
 

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If anyone has a concern with cutting the hose too short (should be enough line to cut off the fitting, but just in case ...), it can be removed from the stock fitting with some careful cutting using a rotary tool (for example, a Dremel) with a cut-off wheel. It is shown in the thread below.

The thread also shows the stock fitting cut open (so you can see just how small those barbs are), measurements on the stock and new fittings, alternate sources for the fittings and clamps, and advice on heating the hose to push on the new fitting (I also used a heat gun the first time, but hot water has less risk of spot overheating the hose).

http://www.lotustalk.com/forums/f312/oil-line-fitting-dissection-measurements-repair-pictures-99266/
 

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I can add just a little to this general discussion from my general experience with working with related stuff…

1st, if you’ve got a corroded fitting, the best penetrating thread lubricant is a 50/50 mix of acetone and ATF (automatic transmission fluid – the old Ford type, but Dextron will work too)…this is twice as good as LiquidWrench. Mix some up and use it in your shop…you will never use anything else.

2nd, I’ve found that the best lubricant to spray on rubber hoses so they slip on is ArmorAll – it absorbs into the rubber, softens it and then slides on real good…heating in water first is still good.
 

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I used the same type of fittings as both Phil & Chris talked about in this thread when i did my DIY version a few months ago & can vouch that these fittings are clearly the ones you want to get if you are going the custom kit route

but instead of the crimped oetiker clamps I used the band clamps & doubled them up on each fitting... haven’t had any issues & am not concerned I ever will (just another clamp option for this fix)

I also used the factory lines (after inspecting they were still in great shape)... but when i did the front oil cooler fittings, the hose wasn’t long enough after making cuts, so i did have to buy about 5-6 ft. more

also, I did this fix before my lines started leaking! & whether owners here choose this method, RLS or s111... the point is its something that I would highly recommend addressing regardless if your factory fittings are leaking now or not... & at this point I wouldn’t trust any Lotus recall solution unless I could verify they are using different/better materials than the same factory stuff (& that’s if they ever do officially go through with the recall to begin with)


put those 2 cents in your childrens piggy banks :nanner:
 
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