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Seatbelt or no? (irrespective of current laws)

  • Both myself and my passenger before I move.

    Votes: 149 89.2%
  • Only me, my passenger can choose.

    Votes: 15 9.0%
  • Not for me, but my passenger must buckle.

    Votes: 1 0.6%
  • I don't care if either of us buckle up.

    Votes: 2 1.2%

  • Total voters
    167
1 - 20 of 52 Posts

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Discussion Starter #1
After reading through john2496's thread, I thought this might be interesting...although, frankly, I hope it's not.
 

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I do, but find requirement of such to be a violation of civil liberties. Much bigger fish to fry, however.

How would you feel if track days became illegal to 'protect you'?
 

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If you don't wear a seat belt you are a freakin' retard.

Like this guy:

<embed src="http://www.metacafe.com/fplayer/1417/no_seat_belt.swf" width="400" height="345" wmode="transparent" pluginspage="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" type="application/x-shockwave-flash">
 

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German Reimport
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If you don't wear a seat belt you are a freakin' retard.

Like this guy:

<embed src="http://www.metacafe.com/fplayer/1417/no_seat_belt.swf" width="400" height="345" wmode="transparent" pluginspage="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" type="application/x-shockwave-flash">

:eek::panic::eek:
That's pretty bad, but at the same time it's somewhat funny how he tries to catch it with one hand while he keeps the other on the passenger seat head rest...
 

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:eek::panic::eek:
That's pretty bad, but at the same time it's somewhat funny how he tries to catch it with one hand while he keeps the other on the passenger seat head rest...
Yeah, I like how it's a bad situation, but not quite so bad as to require two hands. He's saving that move for the real deep ****.
 

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I do, but find requirement of such to be a violation of civil liberties. Much bigger fish to fry, however.
I agree with your perspective, however, seat belt and helmet laws do a lot to keep your insurance rates reasonable. Now, I'd be all for lifting the law as long as insurance companies were exonerated of any liability to cover medical expenses for injuries sustained from not wearing a motorcycle helmet or seat belt.
 

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When I was a kid in the early 1960s my dad got a '62 Valiant. He ordered seat belts as an option. Later he got a '62 Plymouth Fury station wagon that had aftermarket seatbelts. I grew up using seatbelts since I was about 7 or 8 years old. I don't feel right unless I have my seatbelt fastened.

BTW, the wagon had one belt in the back seat that stretched across the entire bench seat... 3 or 4 kids secured by one belt :eek:
 

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Who pays when Mr. No Seatbelt shows up at the hospital because he was falling asleep at the wheel, flips his car and drags his face through the dirt out the open back window? What if he doesn't have insurance? I don't know the answer to this question but I'm guessing we all pay in taxes.

Plenty of ridiculous big brother laws out there but wearing a seatbelt isn't even an inconvenience.
 

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www.theapexinn.com
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If it weren't for seatbelts ( more than once ) I wouldn't be posting here...
 

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I always wear a seatbelt but don't force my passengers. However I am quick to tell them how retarded they are, and they usually buckle up after that.

As for this:
Who pays when Mr. No Seatbelt shows up at the hospital because he was falling asleep at the wheel, flips his car and drags his face through the dirt out the open back window? What if he doesn't have insurance? I don't know the answer to this question but I'm guessing we all pay in taxes.

Plenty of ridiculous big brother laws out there but wearing a seatbelt isn't even an inconvenience.
I had two emergency room trips when I had no insurance and I've paid back all of it plus interest. Unless it's an illegal alien, with no way of tracking them or attaching the bill to their credit record, I don't see how anyone else is footing the bill.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I had two emergency room trips when I had no insurance and I've paid back all of it plus interest. Unless it's an illegal alien, with no way of tracking them or attaching the bill to their credit record, I don't see how anyone else is footing the bill.
From: Medical bills trigger half of all bankruptcies - Money - MSNBC.com
Medical bills make up half of bankruptcies

Study finds most bankruptcy filers had health insurance


BOSTON - Costly illnesses trigger about half of all personal bankruptcies, and most of those who go bankrupt because of medical problems have health insurance, according to findings from a Harvard University study to be released Wednesday.

Researchers from Harvard’s law and medical schools said the findings underscore the inadequacy of many private insurance plans that offer worst-case catastrophic coverage, but little financial security for less severe illnesses.

“Unless you’re Bill Gates, you’re just one serious illness away from bankruptcy,” said Dr. David Himmelstein, the study’s lead author and an associate professor of medicine. “Most of the medically bankrupt were average Americans who happened to get sick.”

The study, to be published online Wednesday by the journal Health Affairs, distributed questionnaires to 1,771 bankruptcy filers in 2001 in California, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Texas. That year, there were 1.46 million personal bankruptcies in the United States.

More than 900 of those questioned underwent more detailed interviews about their financial and medical circumstances for what the authors say is the first in-depth study of medical causes of personal bankruptcies, which have risen rapidly in recent years.

Illness and medical bills were cited as the cause, at least in part, for 46.2 percent of the personal bankruptcies in the study. Himmelstein said the figure rose to 54.5 percent when three other factors were counted as medical-related triggers for bankruptcies: births, deaths and pathological gambling addiction.

The study estimates medical-caused bankruptcies affect about 2 million Americans each year, counting debtors and their dependents, including 700,000 children.

Most were insured

Most of those seeking court protection from creditors had health insurance, with more than three-quarters reporting they had coverage at the start of the illness that triggered bankruptcy. The study said 38 percent had lost coverage at least temporarily by the time they filed for bankruptcy, with illness frequently leading to the loss of both a job and insurance.

Out-of-pocket medical expenses covering co-payments, deductibles and uncovered health services averaged $13,460 for bankruptcy filers who had private insurance at the onset of illness, compared with $10,893 for those without coverage. Those who initially had private coverage but lost it during their illness faced the highest cost, an average of $18,005.

“We need to rethink health reform,” said Dr. Steffie Woolhandler, a study co-author and associate professor of medicine at Cambridge-based Harvard. “Covering the uninsured isn’t enough. We also must upgrade and guarantee continuous coverage for those who have insurance.”

Susan Pisano, a spokeswoman for America’s Health Insurance Plans, representing nearly 1,300 health insurance providers, said the study did not adequately explore the role that disability income protection plans and personal savings can play in helping someone with a medical problem avoid bankruptcy.

“It’s very important to ask questions about what the financial stressors are for American families, but we don’t think this study digs deeply enough,” Pisano said.

Middle-class hit hard

The findings indicate medical-related bankruptcies hit middle-class families hard — 56 percent of the filers owned a home, and the same number had attended college.

“Families with coverage faced unaffordable co-payments, deductibles and bills for uncovered items like physical therapy, psychiatric care and prescription drugs,” Himmelstein said.

The study, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, did not examine how many bankruptcy filers were from dual-income families where both partners had insurance, Himmelstein said.

Jeff Morris, resident scholar at the American Bankruptcy Institute, founded by Congress in 1982 to analyze bankruptcy trends, said the Harvard findings roughly mirror those of a 1996 ABI study in which 57 percent of bankruptcy filers cited medical problems as a primary bankruptcy cause. Respondents in that study were more likely to cite three other factors as primary causes, including easy access to credit, job loss and financial mismanagement.

Morris said he was aware of no data indicating that the Harvard study, which was based on 2001 bankruptcy filings, does not accurately reflect current trends in medical-related bankruptcies.

“Medical coverage is becoming more for catastrophic loss than for intermediate expenses,” Morris said.





© 2008 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
 

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So they polled one tenth of a percent of the people who filed for bankruptcy that year. Most of those people filed because of medical bills they incurred even though they were insured.

So are you telling me that people need better insurance? Or that it needs to be more difficult to file for bankruptcy?

Why not find out the percentage of people who filed for bankruptcy because they were involved in a car wreck while not wearing a seat belt? Wouldn't that information be a little more useful?

Also, once health care is socialized does that mean it'll be ok to make smoking, drinking, racing, etc illegal? I mean these people are risking their lives at the expense of your tax dollars. This argument could be taken to a whole other level and that is where it starts to get dangerous.

Say what you will, but I will not use tax dollars to give me an excuse to tell others how to live their lives.
 

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And what particular civil liberty is being violated?

Your right to be unsafe?

More or less. Government has no place regulateing what I do with or put in my body, if it is not affecting other individuals. If I don't wear a seatbelt it only hurts me. They can publish reccomended guidelines but it's an overstep of their power to enforce said guidelines.
 

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More or less. Government has no place regulateing what I do with or put in my body, if it is not affecting other individuals. If I don't wear a seatbelt it only hurts me. They can publish reccomended guidelines but it's an overstep of their power to enforce said guidelines.
I say then you get no claim for injuries sustained if you are hurt in an MVA, your fault or not.
if you dont care about your own well being, why should we, or the insurance companies?
and dont go suing someone when your SOL from your inuuries due to no seal belt.
if my passenger wasnt going to buckle up, they can walk, ..........no exceptions.

how much effort is it to buckle up, and how stupid is someone if they dont want to do so?
 
Q

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More or less. Government has no place regulateing what I do with or put in my body, if it is not affecting other individuals. If I don't wear a seatbelt it only hurts me. They can publish reccomended guidelines but it's an overstep of their power to enforce said guidelines.
Actually, the seatbelt can help keep you in your seat in the event you lose control of your vehicle and would give you a better chance of gaining control of your vehicle and possible preventing injury to other motorists.

I don't buy your argument... sorry.
 

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I agree with your perspective, however, seat belt and helmet laws do a lot to keep your insurance rates reasonable. Now, I'd be all for lifting the law as long as insurance companies were exonerated of any liability to cover medical expenses for injuries sustained from not wearing a motorcycle helmet or seat belt.
The problem is that the costs would then be shifted to the community through Medicare, Wellfare, and whatever programs cover unpaid medical care expenses.
 

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I always wear mine. Here's why.

I know I was able to slow down in time, but it was close. And the seatbelt kept me tight in the seat.

<a href="http://video.cardomain.com/clip.aspx?key=CE52C5194B22189A"><img src="http://video.cardomain.com/ClipLinkThumb.aspx?id=CE52C5194B22189A" border="0"></a></a>

I can still see the passenger in the other car looking directly at my right headlight. :eek:
 
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