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So, my fiance would like to purchase a Lotus Elise as her daily driver…

My initial reaction was one of scpticism and shock to be honest. Then she started to give me her reasons.

First and foremost, it is the coolest car she has ever seen and she would look awesome in it. I had no argument with this point.

Second, she understands it is a sports car and uncomfortable to drive. She works 5 miles from home and it’s on smooth roads and freeway for 3.3 miles, she measured. But she equates it to high heels; they hurt like crazy, but they look so good. We live northern California so the weather is nice more times than not, and we get no snow. I could not really argue that logic either.

Lastly, she finish’s with some wikipedia info about the car being very easy to maintain if cared for properly, and all the technology that goes into them. I believe wikipedia for the most part, but I like doing my own research.

That brings us to my post on this forum today. If anyone has any insight as to using a Lotus Elise as a daily driver, I would apprecate it greatly. Also, I have a few questions myself. Please note, we highly believe in using what we buy. We purchase nice things to use them, this is the type of item she would maintain very well, but a scratch here and there would not break her heart.

1. What would a yearly maintenance budget be for an Elise that gets less than 5000 miles a year on it? ~2000 per year for work plus an additional 3000 in fun. Any long distance trips, over 30 min drives will be taken in the A8.

2. What are the typical insurance rates for an Elise? She is a female over the age of 25.

3. What often breaks on this car? Aside from the front bumper I keep reading about, are all repairs including engine work this expensive?

4. How bad do speed bumps affect the car? There are two to get in and out of her work place. She can drive around them is she has to, but curious what impact these type of everyday issues affect the drivability.

5. In the Bay Area, it rains for about 3 months each year, the rest is beautiful. How is this car in the rain? Should the hardtop be something she should look for, or is the soft good enough?

6. She has never driven a manual transmission. Could anyone advise on a suitable training course she could/should take prior to owning such a vehicle?

7. If we do purchase I would like to stay under the $30,000; the closer to $25,000 the better. Can a nice Elise be had for this amount?

Sorry for such a long post, but it looks like she is pretty serious about getting one in the next 6 months or so. Thus, I need to do my research now.
Thanks in advance,
-Ray
 

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You have a need............a need to read..............
 

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Based on what you have said... I would say "No".

I would bet she gets tired of it quick. Biggest issue is that it's a drivers car and this is her first manual. You're asking for problems. This is not the car for fender benders.

I live in the bay area and there are a lot of roads that just don't do well with this car.

Her statement of driving 3.3 miles is mute. If it's a daily, it's gonna see far more miles than that.

Not only is the car manual, it's rear wheel mid engine and if she is a new driver in the wet, it could be an issue of safety.

I would recommend a sporty econo 5 or 6 speed for a year or two before putting here into an Elise.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You have a need............a need to read..............
I understand how forums work. But if every question has been asked and answered in the past; and all you want are "new" questions, you have an FAQ site not a forum. Aside the fact that not everyone who are currently active posters have participated in said discussions, thus potentially bringing new information or perspective to the conversation.

That being said, I am reading post after post in my spare time. The search functionality is great, but I have yet to find all my answers. I am not sure how your post was helpful to me; but thank you anyway.

-Ray
 

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Based on what you have said... I would say "No".

I would bet she gets tired of it quick. Biggest issue is that it's a drivers car and this is her first manual. You're asking for problems. This is not the car for fender benders.

I live in the bay area and there are a lot of roads that just don't do well with this car.

Her statement of driving 3.3 miles is mute. If it's a daily, it's gonna see far more miles than that.

Not only is the car manual, it's rear wheel mid engine and if she is a new driver in the wet, it could be an issue of safety.

I would recommend a sporty econo 5 or 6 speed for a year or two before putting here into an Elise.
Excellent information and perspective.

On the fender bender statement, is that due to cost of repairs or the car being unsafe? If its the former, I agree but not relevant to the decision (There are no cheap repairs on my Audi A8L either, nice things cost money to maintain and repair). If the later, I am concerned.

On the distance driven, I agree it will be more than anticipated, but not by much. We drive the Audi 99% of the time, its why we bought it.

I did bring up the issue of safety and this being a true sports car. Her argument is that she would agree to taking and passing a course of my choosing prior to purchase. I can not argue that point. I like the idea of a "starter" sports car argument though.

Sorry to go over every point, in our relationship logical arguments lead to logical decisions. We both debate each side and make a decision. She is currently winning. Though my intention is not to convince her she is wrong, I do need to be devils advocate for such a large purchase.

-Ray
 

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1. About the same as a Honda Civic, just change the oil. If you have under 50k miles, it does not need much. Dealer oil changes cost around $300, but they're nearly as easy as any other car for DIY.

2. They can get high in my experience. This car gets damaged easily. Maybe not as easily in NorCal as in NYC. In NYC I am forced to reinforce the front end with kevlar/carbon weave to avoid destroying it.

3. The front bumper. :) Beware of items rolling around in the trunk. If she uses this car as a daily driver it will be about as mechanically reliable as a Civic with similar mileage.

4. It depends. If you're talking Mexican topes, if you hit things like that at speed you can generate the aforementioned bumper damage. If you're talking American speed bumps, they are still pretty jarring, but nothing ridiculous. I've noticed I don't mind driving this car at speed over the giant speed humps you see in some areas, when the car comes down off the hump it just flattens right out without the bouncing other cars would do if they hit the same hump at a similar speed. It's WYSIWYG, if you see it in the road, that's what you'll feel.

5. Neither top is really leak proof. Park it under a roof, or buy a cover.

6. One of those advanced driving courses where they do skid pad etc, would be great before owning an Elise. She needs to know how to drive a manual before even that though... so teach her yourself. :) Then take her out to dinner.

7. I'm seriously considering selling mine, and it would be in your price range. However it's located on the east coast. Some other people on this forum are also selling relatively clean specimens in that range. Don't buy a used car unless it's someone on this forum.
 

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Also... I think this is a decent car for learning manual. It doesn't have a particularly fragile clutch or transmission, and the stick just goes "thunk" into each position, there is no question of which gear you just put it in. Her issue with this car if any will most likely be the size and inability to bring much more than a few bags of groceries.
 

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You really think its a decent car for learning manual? The transmission is a known weak link, specifically 2nd and 3rd gear synchros. On top of that fixing bad synchros will run you more than it will in a celica...

this question has been asked plenty of times and I really don't think there are any new perspectives. Search is your friend! However:

1. Depends on who is doing the work. If its you, cheap. If you're asking the lotus dealer, not so much.

2. Not sure

3. There is no front bumper. Body work is $$$$. Low mph incident that requires clam replacement, $3k for new clam + paint + starshield. Not cheap. Sometimes you can save money if you know a good glass repair man. Mechanicals are cheaper b/c of toyota parts.

4. none

5. In the rain, L.O.T.U.S.

6. Nothin to it but to do it

7. Doable. In fact, I would try to follow it to a T because of the increased likely hood she may decide its too hard to live with.
 

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1. The relatively the same with other cars. But use good products. So slightly more expensive than a normal economy car.

2. That greatly depends on her. Expect between 100-300 a month.

3. down below

4. Speed bumps don't damage anything unless you hit the clam.

5. Neither the hardtop or soft top is leak proof, but the hardtop is a must in my opinion. But I don't even drive mine in the rain so i don't know.

6. Just as someone else mentioned , its not just a manual its also a mid engine rear wheel drive.
If you throw an object with the weight in the front forward, the object will tend to want to follow the weight. In the case of a midengined car, a lot of the weight is behind the driver. Like throwing a carpenter's hammer with the head in the back. It will rotate.

In a front engined car, when you go around a corner, the front of the car will want to stay in front. In fact, it will resist turning, so that means the car tends to "understeer" which means it turns less than you want. If you go into a corner too hot, you increase the understeer. That is not good, because you can run off the road with the front of the car. But it is somewhat controllable and you can slow the car down in the turn if you are too fast.

The physics of cars is that if you go into a corner too hot in a front engined car and hit the brakes, you slow down and actually can transfer grip to the front tires, since the car experiences more weight shift. You unweight the rear tires, so you can increase oversteer, which may reduce the understeer. In any case, if you wreck, you will probably do so nose first. But you can handle things by slowing the car down with brakes.

This is why most production cars are understeer biased. It's safer for the general public. Front engined cars are probably safer also for people who are not skilled also.

Now here is the difference in a midengined car. The weight is behind you. And it always wants to be in front. There are some good things in physics about the weight being behind you in racing. The ability of the car to rotate. Weight over the driving wheels. Launching. Weight transfer under braking. All better.

The first thing to understand is what we mean when we consider the ability of a tire to maintain traction with the road surface. To keep this under 1000+ words, I will just say that it's very important, and when you exceed the ability of the tires, you lose control. Many things come into play that determine what the ability of your tires are. These things may be:

Speed or g-forces. Sideways forces take their toll.
Weight pressing down on the tires. If you unweight the tire, it will lose grip.
Road and stickiness. Ice of course is bad, so is a patch of wet or some gravel, or even a small bump that upsets the weight balance.

The main trick with some of those things is to not get too close to your limits of adhesion, because none of us are superhuman and can forsee everything possible ahead of us on the road. You can play with the limits where it is safe to do so. But a public road is not the place.

However, what typically happens is this. Driver goes into turn near the limits of the tires ability. We call that driving near 10/10ths. Most non-skilled drivers can't feel the difference between 8/10ths and 11/10ths.

Something happens. That patch of wet. Something in the road. Evasive maneuver. A squirrel. Something. Or maybe just realizing you are going into the turn too hot. Probably the most common reason.

You can do certain things BEFORE the turn. Remember, the mass behind you wants to go straight in front of you. If you are in a straight line, that is not a bad thing. If you are in a straight line, hit the brakes hard. But in the turn....now you have an issue.

The normal driver reaction is to panic. And panic is not good. If you abruptly lift on the throttle, jerk the steering wheel, or worse, slam on your brakes (which most people do).... you cause some things to happen. You transfer weight to the front of the car so now the front increases it's grip, but the rear loses grip. And the rear wants to lead. The rear end will start a very bad oversteer where the car starts to spin. Even if you can catch it, often the correction will induce a huge spin in the opposite direction.

And if you are spinning, you have *almost* no control. You will have no idea where you will end up. You can spin into things or opposing traffic.

The solution for this is to understand and learn car control. One of the best (safe) places to learn car control and what 10/10ths is, is a local autocross. Here you can spin out over and over. And many people do. Even on a safe racing track, it's not always safe to spin out and go off the track.

7.Yes you can find a good one between 25 and 30,000.

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There are things to consider:
1. SIZE AND SAFETY, TRAFFIC, ROADS, VISIBILITY
The Elise is a smaller car and this will be apparent when driving on the road next to an Escalade. It takes a little bit to get used to the feeling, but you will. Any smaller car carries some extra risk (though you gain some safety by nimbleness, great brakes). The Elise has an excellent safety record and uses large door crash beams and an integral rollbar. It is a safe car.

Driving a small (low) car like the Elise means you are not easily seen. If you are behind, or to the passenger side of a taller vehicle like an SUV or Van, they can't see you. This means you should adopt some different methods or techniques. Do not drive on the passenger side of most cars. Do not follow too close for a distance (they will forget you are there). Do not pull up at a stop right behind someone taller (try to move over to the left to be seen in their side mirror). Try to avoid passing cars on the right (as you should anyway). Pretend you are a motorcycle, but much lower. Keep alert to avoidance and where your escape route is.

Low and fragile. Take special care about hitting road debris. A tire tread can cause a lot of damage on an Elise. If you drive roads with a lot of debris (some Los Angeles freeways), maybe this is not the right car for the commute.

Roads. The tighter suspension and shorter wheelbase mean that the Elise can hop over bridge connections and jar over broken roads, specially concrete. If you drive a lot on less smooth roads, the jarring can get tiresome. This is a lot worse IMO on a sport package Elise than a non-sport, mainly due to tires.

Visibility. In the Exige.. lol. But even in the Elise, it is not so good. You can make it a lot better, with the installation of the concave mirrors. But you are in a low sportscar with blind spots, so take extra care when changing lanes.

2. PARKING
Included in this is entrances and exits. The low ground clearance and longer front overhang mean that the front of the car can easily scrape on entering a driveway, or into a gas station. You need to review each and every ramp to see if clearance is a problem (try using an angled approach, but always be VERY willing to say screw it and find another entrance or station or whatever). Hitting the clam on the pavement is a bad thing. One thing to really look for, is the evil parking lot where the entrance is not a problem, but the exit is.

Parking garages. SOME garages have a pretty sharp angle where the ramp to the next floor is joined. Worst nightmare is getting "high sided" on a point. Know your garage and know if you can drive it and get out.

Parallel Parking. Due to the low height of the car, people will often not see it. And even if they do, some people routinely park by tapping the other car lightly. But on an Elise, this can cause a LOT of damage. Do not parallel park the car. And if you do, only take the most forward position as most incidents are from people backing up and not seeing the Lotus.

Even normal side by side parking is more potentially damaging in the Lotus. The low height means people will not see you in that tall SUV to your left and they swing out and clip you as they go to leave. Or swing in to park in your space, not seeing the car until it is too late. Don't pull up too far, leave your butt hanging out more even with the other cars. Also, on the same token, get used to not pulling up as far because if you hit the parking berm, you will damage your clam. Do not drive up and use the tires against the concrete berm method. Stop 4 feet back. And if you are at a place known for large people hauling large things... park far away. You don't want people trying to fit a cart next to your car, or moving 2x4 wood next to your car. This includes Home Depot, Walmart, Ikea, Costco. Park at the far edge of the lot.

Valet parking. Are you nuts? Maybe if you know them, but better to tip and ask if you can park it yourself. Or just don't.. some valets end up parking your car around the corner where the crack gang hangs out.

So what is left for parking? Walking is good exercise and you can apply some rules for determining good spaces.

3. ATTENTION AND PERCEPTIONS

Two main issues here. One is attention. Now many of us have a little inner attention whore and some attention is fun. Nice to get the occasional wave or question. But often, the attention can get too much. As stated before, this is really dependent on the person. For example, Dennis of dpcars said he had to sell the Elise a ways back, because driving it was like having to put on a tux for a prom, every time he just wanted to go to the convenience store. You will not travel incognito, if you were going to the local strip club, all your neighbors will mention it the next day. Stopping at a gas station means you will probably get a question or two. After a while, some of the questions can be old..such as "Lotus? Who makes that?" and the popular, "how much did you pay for that?" and "how many cylinders/what is the top speed/what does it do in the 1/4mile." Most people mean well and we are really ambassadors of the brand. People will also tend to drive up to the car, regardless of your speed. You can be driving 85mph and see some old minivan speeding like a bat out of hell, just to get along side of you. Except mostly, they hang out in your blind spot, which makes lane changes difficult. You can see people taking pics or video from the next car. And sometimes, it really brings out the stupid in people.

The other issue is perception. Some people think you are driving the most expensive car in the world for some reason. And they don't like it. You are instantly a dick for rubbing their face in it. Not too many, the car brings out more positives than say a Hummer or Lambo, but still... it happens. The kid in the Civic with a fart can will want to race and will do dumb stuff. The Mustang guy will challenge you and cop an attitude. You may find this is not the right car for business, because of the perceptions (right or wrong!) of your customers, clients, or their employees. You will be seen as too flashy, too risky, too much a big spender, maybe even someone that will not live long in a car like that.

4. HAULING

This one may seem a bit obvious. There are limitations on hauling. Duh. There are things you can haul quite easily. A couple of duffel bags for travel, no problem. Your helmet might fit in the boot. Maybe. There is a little room behind the seats. And if you don't have a passenger, you have all the space in his seat and in his footwell to carry all kinds of stuff. But there are limitations. The rear boot, is not bad... but the mouth opening is quite small. So little items that you can push around the wheel wells works well. Soft items work well. A roll-on luggage bag, probably will not fit in the mouth. So trips to the store also have the same limitations. You can pick up a couple bags of groceries, specially if you are willing to take them out of the bag, nothing is frozen (or your trip is not too long), or you can use the passenger seat. But heavy stuff, bad idea, specially in the boot. It can't handle heavy loads and the back of the tail lights are exposed and the wiring connectors can get broken. If you have a hardtop on the car, there is also more of a limit on getting bulky items in through the door into the passenger seat.

5. PASSENGERS, EGRESS AND INGRESS

First getting in and out. As the driver, this is not so bad. And most people get better at it. As the driver, you can grab the steering wheel and that helps (try not to use it as main lever though, as it can affect the steering over time). But if you are taller, heavier, less nimble, older, or injured... this can be a lot harder. I think most people make too much of this and I am most of the above... and it was not that hard. But it can be for you. Specially if the hard top is on. With the top off, you can almost get in standing up and then sit down. One trick, is to push the seat back (if you move it up) all the way before exiting, so when you get back in, you have more room. Make this a habit.

But passengers. This can be a problem. Getting in and out as a passenger is harder. And they probably have less experience and it can seem quite awkward, and you are yelling at them to quit grabbing the windshield right? Because you know that grabbing the windshield for support can damage it. And maybe that passenger had an operation, or strained something, or is a bit heavier, or older. They may find it more difficult. And certain body shapes and sizes, just plain will not fit, specially if the hips are too wide for the seat. Or if they are over 6'5" (maybe). Or if they are too heavy. Larger torso people will also find their upper bodies touching the other person. Think coach airline seating. There will be touchage.

And it should go without saying that 2 seaters can't carry as many people... but you knew that right?

6. NOISE AND COMFORT

This is a biggie for many and a bit controversial... or at least more subjective. Lets consider first a Lexus. You easily slide over into the smooth leather seat, turn the seat heaters on and feel your butt get warm. Ahh... closing the doors seals off the outer world and it is whisper quiet. Turn on the Nakamichi stereo through the 14 speakers and even barely cranked, you can pick out musical nuances. Set the climate control to 76 degrees automatic mode. Tell the nav system to take you home. Drive as if on a cloud, lost in thought, or perhaps carry on business with your cell phone. That sets the stage for what the Elise is not.

The Elise is an aluminum tub with an engine and wheels bolted to it. The aluminum is a great material for lightness and rigidity (yay!) and also well know as a great conductor of heat, sound. You also have an engine right behind your head. And not much in the way of sound deadening or insulation. This experience is why you bought the car, this is not a negative!!! BUT... you can just about forget hearing the nuances in the music. Certain types of music work better in this car than others. Think- Simple and Loud. The radio reception probably sucks anyway. And using a cell phone? LOL. Almost possible. But not easy. If the top is off, the wind will create a lot of noise too. I recommend leaving the top on for longer trips and using earplugs if you want the top anyway. High levels of extended noise is very tiring. You will also hear every bit of gravel hitting the bottom of the car, the noise of the gearbox. The air intake. Burbles and pops from the exhaust. All good stuff. If you like that kind of stuff.

Temperatures. Well... hmm... see... SOME Elise cars were built with good AC. I have personally experienced this. On the other hand, some just suck dead bunnies up a straw. I guess there was some sort of Freon Fairy and some cars were blessed. I think 75% of the content on this site is how to fix the Air Conditioning, so that should tell you something. Again, this will depend on where you live. But if you plan on wearing a business suit to a meeting on a muggy August day in Alabama... seriously? If the top is off, you will feel superheated air from the front radiator washing over the windshield (and some of it tumbling into the cabin). The other bit of this equation is that the tub itself, and all the bits, get hot after some time driving. The side sills contain the coolant and oil lines...so they eventually get warm...er...hot. If you drive the car for 8 hours on a hot day, things will be warm.

The heater works well. It may not be a coincidence that the car is built where it can get pretty cold, but not too hot. But then that does not explain water leaks, does it?

Seating. This will certainly depend on the person and their body, but I found the seats very easy to sit in for long periods of time. Very comfortable. Everything is easy to reach in the car. Now after some time on a long trip, you may wish for cruise control... but really I don't think it is an issue. Starbuck fanatics on a road trip can get aftermarket cupholders.

Still all in all, this is not a Porsche or Lexus or a Honda S2000 or just about any production car. It is a LOTUS and you drive it because of this, not in spite of it.

7. RELIABILITY,

The Elise is way ahead of some previous cars made by certain British companies. Still, that is not saying much is it? It still can have some quirks and you might have to deal with them or put up with them. The type of build on the car, the racecar like suspension, contribute to a certain required maintenance. Anyone that races cars should understand this. If you expect a bulletproof car with ZERO problems... well, wish for peace on earth and a supermodel while you are at it. It is not horrible though, and reading forums like this might make it seem so, since not many people (except Larry) bother to post "Another day with my car and no problems!" but people do post when something is wrong. Stuff like the speedo failing, alarm system problems, idle problems. And maybe, your inside mirror might fall off. Or turn signal pop out. Stuff happens! You deal with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
WOW, Thank you MyFutureSelfnMe. That was a very informational post. I did research the front splitter and can see some immediate relatively low cost preventative items that will go on to assist in preventing damage.

I am glad to see the mechanics to be on par with a Civic under proper similar maintenance and care. That does indeed bring it into reality as a daily car. I assumed the oil changes at a dealer would be ridiculous, but if its DYI then I assume my Audi mechanic (not dealer) could do it a reasonable cost.

I am worried about the leak proof issues. It can be parked under cover in both locations it will generally be (work and home), but as we both have stated, it does not rain that often here in the Bay Area. I know it lacks "creature comforts", but keeping you dry and warm when needed is kind of a higher priority desire heh. I assume there are some aftermarket items that address the "creature comfort" issues.

Thank you again for such a great response.

-Ray


1. About the same as a Honda Civic, just change the oil. If you have under 50k miles, it does not need much. Dealer oil changes cost around $300, but they're nearly as easy as any other car for DIY.

2. They can get high in my experience. This car gets damaged easily. Maybe not as easily in NorCal as in NYC. In NYC I am forced to reinforce the front end with kevlar/carbon weave to avoid destroying it.

3. The front bumper. :) Beware of items rolling around in the trunk. If she uses this car as a daily driver it will be about as mechanically reliable as a Civic with similar mileage.

4. It depends. If you're talking Mexican topes, if you hit things like that at speed you can generate the aforementioned bumper damage. If you're talking American speed bumps, they are still pretty jarring, but nothing ridiculous. I've noticed I don't mind driving this car at speed over the giant speed humps you see in some areas, when the car comes down off the hump it just flattens right out without the bouncing other cars would do if they hit the same hump at a similar speed. It's WYSIWYG, if you see it in the road, that's what you'll feel.

5. Neither top is really leak proof. Park it under a roof, or buy a cover.

6. One of those advanced driving courses where they do skid pad etc, would be great before owning an Elise. She needs to know how to drive a manual before even that though... so teach her yourself. :) Then take her out to dinner.

7. I'm seriously considering selling mine, and it would be in your price range. However it's located on the east coast. Some other people on this forum are also selling relatively clean specimens in that range. Don't buy a used car unless it's someone on this forum.
Also... I think this is a decent car for learning manual. It doesn't have a particularly fragile clutch or transmission, and the stick just goes "thunk" into each position, there is no question of which gear you just put it in. Her issue with this car if any will most likely be the size and inability to bring much more than a few bags of groceries.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thank You.

You really think its a decent car for learning manual? The transmission is a known weak link, specifically 2nd and 3rd gear synchros. On top of that fixing bad synchros will run you more than it will in a celica...

this question has been asked plenty of times and I really don't think there are any new perspectives. Search is your friend! However:

1. Depends on who is doing the work. If its you, cheap. If you're asking the lotus dealer, not so much.

2. Not sure

3. There is no front bumper. Body work is $$$$. Low mph incident that requires clam replacement, $3k for new clam + paint + starshield. Not cheap. Sometimes you can save money if you know a good glass repair man. Mechanicals are cheaper b/c of toyota parts.

4. none

5. In the rain, L.O.T.U.S.

6. Nothin to it but to do it

7. Doable. In fact, I would try to follow it to a T because of the increased likely hood she may decide its too hard to live with.
 

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I try to make maintenance video guide for new owners on my youtube channel.

This is for the engine oil and filter changing.


You can do your maintenance yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
1. The relatively the same with other cars. But use good products. So slightly more expensive than a normal economy car.........
Best post EVER. You made ME want a Lotus and I am the one who bought an A8L for a 25 minute ride to work because I insist on comfort first. But your post, even with the negatives, makes a Lotus sound like an awesome machine as long as you respect what it is and is not.

I appreciate all of your insight and we will be discussing all of the issues you mentioned. As you were so well balanced with all of the potential issues, you definitely left us with a lot to talk about.

With all of that being said, I think you own a Lotus because you are passionate about the car. She seems to have it, It's my job to test it before making such a purchase.

Thank you very much.

-Ray
 

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Best post EVER. You made ME want a Lotus and I am the one who bought an A8L for a 25 minute ride to work because I insist on comfort first. But your post, even with the negatives, makes a Lotus sound like an awesome machine as long as you respect what it is and is not.

I appreciate all of your insight and we will be discussing all of the issues you mentioned. As you were so well balanced with all of the potential issues, you definitely left us with a lot to talk about.

With all of that being said, I think you own a Lotus because you are passionate about the car. She seems to have it, It's my job to test it before making such a purchase.

Thank you very much.

-Ray
If you are in the bay area, i wouldn't mind catching up with you two and discuss the car. I live in Ceres, but I go to the bay area quite often. At least twice a month.
 

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Get a nice beater Miata; if she really like's it, after a year go find an Elise. Both car's are a blast; the Lotus is a much distilled version! Or if she really craves lightweight purity, but the car in my icon: 120HP, and under 1000lbs.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
That would be great. Are you a member of the Golden Gate Lotus Club? She found that resource as well and I thought it would be worth joining.

-Ray

If you are in the bay area, i wouldn't mind catching up with you two and discuss the car. I live in Ceres, but I go to the bay area quite often. At least twice a month.
 

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That would be great. Are you a member of the Golden Gate Lotus Club? She found that resource as well and I thought it would be worth joining.

-Ray
I'm not a member on there. Great info is all around though :)
 
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