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While going through the 1.7GB of data, picts and movies I have on my system about the elise ;), I found a document about the recomended storage. I don't know where it came from, yes I did spend a lot of time researching and acumulating anything about the car :p. It's amazing what this vehicle makes us do.

Anyway, since I don't know where it comes from I can't say it's the lotus recomended storage instructions, I just thought it will be helpfull.

Vehicle Storage

If the car is to be stored for a prolonged period, a secure garage is the recommended practice. The following guidelines are provided for information:

• Ensure the engine oil and filter, coolant and brake fluid have recently been renewed. The a.c. system should be in good working order and fully charged.

• Thoroughly clean the inside and outside of the car, including the engine compartment. If necessary, use a ‘jet’ washer to remove dirt and salt deposits from the underside, but do not use around bearings, hydraulic components, painted surfaces or the soft top roof. Allow to dry completely.

• Chock the road wheels, leave off the parking brake, and engage reverse gear.

• Increase the tyre pressures to 60 psi (4 bar). If possible, move the car slightly every month to help avoid flat spots on the tyres.

• If possible, operate all the controls periodically (without starting the engine) including pressing the brake pedal vigorously.

• Protect metallic components in the engine bay using a proprietary product such as WD40 or ACF 50.

• Either leave the battery in the car and connect a battery management (conditioner) type of charger, or remove the battery and trickle charge every two months. Note that with the battery disconnected or removed, the alarm system is de-activated. Lotus supplies a number of different battery charges and conditioners. Please refer to the accessory section or contract your dealer for further information.

• Unless the garage is equipped with a de-humidifier, the use of drying agents (Silica-Gel) is recommended in cars with leather upholstery and in conditions of high humidity.

• The use of unapproved car covers may have a detrimental effect on the body paint finish, which will not be covered by the vehicle warranty.

In general, all cars are kept in best operating condition by regular use.
 

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If the environment around the garage/storage is secure, i'd put it on 4 jackstands then use wood and carpet pieces for the wheels to sit on at normal suspension height. the tires support suspension weight and the jackstands support the chassis weight.
Then you'll be guarranteed 5 or so days in the dead of winter where the sky is cloudless and temp is in the mid 60's;)
m
 

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thegit said:
If the environment around the garage/storage is secure, I'd put it on 4 jackstands then use wood and carpet pieces for the wheels to sit on at normal suspension height.
The only way the tires/wheels would be at normal suspension height is when they are supporting the weight of the car - the jack stands would be doing nothing in this case.

DO NOT leave a car without the suspension supporting the car for any long period of time. Leaving a car with the suspension "drooped" will cause the rubber bushings in the suspension to be overly stressed and to fail early. The bushings usually consist of two steel sleeves with rubber in between. One sleeve is clamped to the suspension, and the other is clamped to the chassis. Any movement is provided by the flexibility of the rubber between the sleeves. If you leave the suspension "drooped", the rubber is "twisted" and under the maximum stress - if left like that for a long period of time, it will deteriorate. The normal ride height is the "relaxed" position of the rubber bushes...

As a point of reference, my Elan was on jack stands for a long period of time during it's very lengthly restoration (life kept getting in the way). When I removed some of the suspension parts (to replace the bushings), many of the bushings were two pieces - the rubber having completely disconnected from the sleeves. In this case, it was acceptable because I had planned to replace all the suspension bushings - but I'd hate to do that to a new car...
 

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Tim, I should clarify that the tire/wheel will be just resting on the blocks, as high as possible to avoid the bushings taking a bad set with too much droop. This will help avoid the cold flat spotting of the tires especially the softer compounds.
I store the Birkin in this manner as, like you say, the bushing material is in torsion with suspension travel. Of course the Elise will show more droop than a se7en.
m
 

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thegit said:
Tim, I should clarify that the tire/wheel will be just resting on the blocks, as high as possible to avoid the bushings taking a bad set with too much droop. This will help avoid the cold flat spotting of the tires especially the softer compounds.
But as long as the tires/wheels are not supporting the full weight of the car, the bushings are under "load". Tire flat spotting isn't really a problem any more with modern radial tires - at worst, a bit of warming them up while driving will eliminate any flat spotting. If you are really worried, roll the car around every week or two (or even jack it up and spin the tires a bit) to keep them from resting on one spot for too long. Even if it did cause permanent tire flat spotting, I'd rather replace tires than suspension bushings...
 

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meat said:
So how do you know when in the vehicle manufacturing process your wishbone pivot bolts are tightened?
When the factory assembles the car they lower it onto the suspension (or other wise move things to the proper ride height before tightening things. When ever you do any work on the suspension that requires loosing any of the suspension bushings, the car should be lowered onto the suspension, and the car should be rolled back and forth a few feet so make sure that things have settled. Then tighten (and torque to the proper settings) the bolts. It can be a real pain in a low car, but you have to do it that way. I've had success lowing the car onto RhinoRamps and moving it back and forth many times - the Ramps provide enough clearance to get under and tighten things.

Some day, I plan on having a four post lift (and a garage tall enough) - this is one of the many things that will be easier with a drive on lift...
 
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