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Emira factory setting - SPORT vs TOUR

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I'm not sure to be honest.

I had an Evora S which was supposed to be the more hardcore version of the Evora, with Pzero Corsa tyres, stiffer bushings, damping and anti-roll bar, yet it was perfect on bumpy backroads. So when we get more info my question to the dealer is going to be which package is closer to the Evora S set-up. I'd change tyres to PS4S immediately though, Cup2's require too much heat for road use
 
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Thank you for your sage advice. For many, myself included, we're tempted by the word sport but in actuality would be a pain to live with if we're mostly driving around town with the occasional trip to the track. You've convinced me to go with the touring/standard pack.
If you choose touring, You can always go aftermarket suspension and tires later. That’s what I’ll end up doing.
 

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Does anyone here know what effective ride frequencies regular and sport rates have been used in the past for the Evora? I suspect Lotus won’t stray far from the same ride frequencies for the Emira.
The 111 sport suspension springs were 10% stiffer than the base/touring springs.
 
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I hope before we have to make this choice they can answer the question: Is e.g. the Evora GT stock setup closer to Emira Sport or Emira Touring?
 

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On the 111, springs were only 10% stiffer, but the shock dampening made the ride quality more than 10% worse, if that makes sense. Harsh rebound characteristics. Lotus philosophy was to only make the springs barely stiff enough to support the R-compound tires. In those days, they didn't mind a little body roll.

My sense is to only get the sport suspension if it is (1) a particularly good value or (2) includes items that are hard / costly to change afterwards. Because guys who like to track will be changing to their aftermarket Ohlins / Penske / whatever @shinoo comes up with anyway.
 

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On the 111, springs were only 10% stiffer, but the shock dampening made the ride quality more than 10% worse, if that makes sense. Harsh rebound characteristics. Lotus philosophy was to only make the springs barely stiff enough to support the R-compound tires. In those days, they didn't mind a little body roll.

My sense is to only get the sport suspension if it is (1) a particularly good value or (2) includes items that are hard / costly to change afterwards. Because guys who like to track will be changing to their aftermarket Ohlins / Penske / whatever @shinoo comes up with anyway.
That's exactly what I was thinking, I'll probably be upgrading in short order to a 3way after a dozen track days. Really depends what else gets upgraded -- and don't necessarily care for 20" cup2s.
 

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If you choose touring, You can always go aftermarket suspension and tires later. That’s what I’ll end up doing.
And ruin a nearly perfectly dialed in setup from factory possibly along with getting rid of the standard active damping? lol Ok great idea good luck
 

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And ruin a nearly perfectly dialed in setup from factory possibly along with getting rid of the standard active damping? lol Ok great idea good luck
Yeah these new cars are getting so technical, and the manufacturers are doing all the things and more that the aftermarket used to do to get every last ounce of performance, that I'm now really hesitant to make changes without very carefully considering it. It's not like the old days where mass-manufactured cars were average, and with add-on parts you could easily make big gains in performance. They don't leave much on the table anymore, and getting to be less and less, to the point where it's not worth the cost and hassle to gain whatever crumbs there might be. I'll know once I drive it, but this new Lotus may just be the first car I've ever owned where I don't or don't feel the need to change anything.
 

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My thought is to get the Tour and replace the Goodyear’s with Michelin Sport 4S or even the Sport packages Cup 2. Tires make the world of difference by themselves.
 

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Everything I have read, coming from Europe, is that touring will be more typical Lotus setup. Still good on the track but better for every day driver. There will be two sport modes with the second one being very stiff and for people who really only want to drive on the track.
 

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Cup2 entirely unnecessary on a public road. The manufacturers are using them to pump up test rtesults.... lousy on the street unless it never goes below 70. If you track, get a second set of wheels for them and run proper high end street tires like a Continental ECS, my personal favorite. Actually some of the new Goodyear F1 supercar and F1R tires are EXCELLENT according to a few folks that get the difference
 
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Everything I have read, coming from Europe, is that touring will be more typical Lotus setup. Still good on the track but better for every day driver. There will be two sport modes with the second one being very stiff and for people who really only want to drive on the track.
Never owned a Lotus but I thought a "typical Lotus setup" was more for track and back road than every day driver. I'd hardly say that the Elise or Exige were good daily drivers, the Evora was the closest to a GT car in the last 20 years, but even that was pretty track focused. This Emira should be even easier to live with every day and the touring should be focused more on the daily driver than the track nut, those guys get the sports set up.
 

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And ruin a nearly perfectly dialed in setup from factory possibly along with getting rid of the standard active damping? lol Ok great idea good luck
Who says it's nearly perfectly dialed? As good as the Elige is/was, it's sports suspension could be greatly improved. Ditto the Evora. Lotus will 'get it right' but they will also balance the economics. There will be some compromises.
 
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Never owned a Lotus but I thought a "typical Lotus setup" was more for track and back road than every day driver. I'd hardly say that the Elise or Exige were good daily drivers, the Evora was the closest to a GT car in the last 20 years, but even that was pretty track focused. This Emira should be even easier to live with every day and the touring should be focused more on the daily driver than the track nut, those guys get the sports set up.
The really hard core track nut will get the cheaper car, and install better aftermarket setup.
 
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The really hard core track nut will get the cheaper car, and install better aftermarket setup.
Cheaper car as in the AMG engine with the DCT? I mean if you want the best track times, most tuning capability, and lightest I think that would be smart. Personally if it doesn't have a manual I'm just not interested. I'm not setting any records anyway, so a bit slower and a bit heavier is fine for me.
 

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Who says it's nearly perfectly dialed? As good as the Elige is/was, it's sports suspension could be greatly improved. Ditto the Evora. Lotus will 'get it right' but they will also balance the economics. There will be some compromises.
Agreed! There’s always a balance to be had, I’m sure Lotus targets reasonable sporty ride frequencies.

For some people that track more they can target higher ride frequencies and adjustable high and low speed compression to dial in turn in response and suspension characteristics that match their circuit.
 

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It may be wishful thinking but if that Lotus tour and test drives hold true for deposit holders…hopefully we can try out both setups.

I’m definitely not getting this to daily drive and want it to feel special every time I drive it which would be like 2000 miles a year. For that reason I’m leaning toward sport mode but it would be nice to feel both before ordering.
 
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It may be wishful thinking but if that Lotus tour and test drives hold true for deposit holders…hopefully we can try out both setups.

I’m definitely not getting this to daily drive and want it to feel special every time I drive it which would be like 2000 miles a year. For that reason I’m leaning toward sport mode but it would be nice to feel both before ordering.
Good luck with that. Welcome to Lotus. It will feel special if you put 100k a year on it. You’ll be abusing the car if you only put 2k a year on it.

You’ll rationalize taking it to the convenience store, to Home Depot, to get your haircut.

If they get this right and it drives like a proper Lotus, it will ruin you for any other sports car and driving your Supra will feel like you’re driving a RAV 4.

You’ll see.

How they handle the initial test drives will be telling. Geely is different than Proton. FYI for the Elise the individual dealers decided who was viable to actually drive the car. Right or wrong, if they pegged you as a tire kicker even with a deposit, you'd get a ride while a sales rep drove the car, and sent on your way. A refundable deposit wasn't a guarantee that you'd get a robust test drive. You might get around the block and back. Never getting up to highway speed. If you had plunked down a larger non refundable or if you had a positive history with the dealer, you'd get a longer ride.

If you complained and threatened to pull your deposit, they’d say ‘Ok’ then take your slot and move to someone willing to pay over MSRP.

I remember when the Evora demo came to Criswell in Maryland. I bought 2 Exiges from Criswell, so I got an invite. The car was in town for a single day. When I got there, there were at least 20 guys in line to take a test drive. They DID take you out on the interstate so you could get it up to highway speed, but that was about it. Short, not so sweet, next guy jumped in. Car headed out of town within hours of getting there. And at the time Criswell was one of the highest volume, oldest, and longest suffering Lotus dealerships in the country.

Hopefully Geely will do it differently. But if you've got a $2500 refundable deposit, don't expect VIP treatment when the driver rolls into town. You may just get a ride around the block in the one driver they have.
 
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