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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Study Shows Even Light Rain Increases Risk of Traffic Fatalities


Take this as your periodic reminder to slow down in the rain and snow.






  • A new weather study, created using radar analysis rather than traditional weather-station data, shows a correlation between deadly car accidents and wet weather.
  • Rain increases the risk of a fatal car crash by 34 percent, the study found.
  • Northern areas of the Rocky Mountains and the Midwest, and winter driving featuring freezing rain or snow, are most affected by the accident risk.


A new study from the North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies shows that fatal traffic accidents are 34 percent more likely during "precipitation events" and 27 percent more likely even in light rain.

“We’re talking a drizzle, just at the point where you might consider taking an umbrella out,” said study author Scott Stevens in an interview with the Associated Press. “People slow down when it starts to rain heavily, but I think they underappreciate the risk of light rain."

The study analyzed 125,012 accidents with fatalities in the United States between 2006 and 2011 while also looking at weather patterns during the time when the crashes occurred. Past studies have relied on police reports and the nearest weather station to estimate rainfall, but this study, using high-resolution radar data analysis, was able to more accurately pinpoint what types of weather events cause the largest increase.

The likelihood of a deadly accident is still higher in heavy-precipitation weather events, but the fact that the study showed such a spike with just light rain is more shocking. It also shows that accident risk due to wet weather is highest during morning rush-hour travel and in the winter.

Areas of the country most susceptible to the spike in traffic accidents due to weather include northern parts of the Midwest and the Rocky Mountain region, likely because of more snow. Risks proved to be slightly lower in the southeastern and northeastern United States.



https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a27453134/rain-car-accident-risk-higher/

https://ncics.org/cics-news/precipitation-and-fatal-motor-vehicle-crashes/
 

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No kidding.....but in the proper hands, its when we can play at reasonable speeds....hehe
 

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I wish they would've discussed whether or not the adage is true that the road is slickest when it begins to rain. The logic being that heavy rain washes away the oil on the road, so the first rain in couple days initially has the most oil film. Personal experience corroborates this, but that's far from scientific.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Modern cars don't allow much venting onto the road, but, like you, experience told me it was true (yrs ago).
 

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I wish they would've discussed whether or not the adage is true that the road is slickest when it begins to rain. The logic being that heavy rain washes away the oil on the road, so the first rain in couple days initially has the most oil film. Personal experience corroborates this, but that's far from scientific.
It's true, but it is not oil from cars (typically) that make them slicker. Besides the dust from dirt, brake dust, tire rubber dust, etc that settle on the road and when mixed with water will create a slick surface, roads that are paved with asphalt will get oily from the separation of the asphaltic oils used to bind the aggregate together. The asphalt bitumen contains heavy and light oils. When warm, the light aromatic oils within the bitumen will separate and often make it to the surface. It is such a small amount that when the pavement is dry, most of the oils will be scrubbed and carried off with traffic and mixed with the dusts previously mentioned. Early rains after a period of warm dry weather will mix with the oils and dust and make a slick surface.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
After hydroplaning home from Boston on A048s, I was happy to get RE-11s. These are terrific in the wet, even standing water. I think they are discontinued and RE-71R are not as good in the wet (as per TR).

When I picked up the new Elise at dealer, the friend who drove me there (semi-famous Toyota engineer who built championship winning bikes and cars) looked at those A048s: "You know if the guy in the car ahead of you spits out the window, you're going to spin, right?"
 
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