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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
With proper snow tires, how is the Evora in the snow compared to other rear-wheel drive cars (e.g., BMW 3 series, MB, etc.)?

More specifically, I currently have a MB C55 AMG as a DD (which I'm considering selling for an Evora). From what I've read online, both appear to have the same 120mm ground clearance. While the C55 isn't what I'd call great in the snow, I haven't had a problem getting to/from work even with questionably-plowed roads in the Boston area.
 

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As you've learned with your C55, any car with modern winter tires will be just fine in pretty much any US city. The Evora should be *slighty* better as the engine is closer to the drive wheels, though it will rotate more easily. Go for it!
 

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Evora is better than 3 Series. 3 Series was fun but very little traction. To see how controlable the Evora is, just check out
or

I will use mine as DD and really look forward. Might even take it to the Alps for some winter ice track training...
 

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I daily drive my Evora and felt very comfortable with the car in the snow. I actually felt more secure in the Evora than in my wife's AWD car. Snow tires are of course a must, but I still can't find tires in the sizes close to Lotus specs. I got the Pirelli Sottozero in the closest sizes I could, but the rears are a tad narrow and don't protect the wheel.

I posted some other thoughts about winter in this thread if you'd like to read, but it's not specific to snow.

I'd be happy to answer any specific snow/winter questions you might have.
 

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Take care... the Evora is tricky with Snowtries on snow and ice. I would say it thisway: if you drive normally with a certain portion of care, it is no problem. But the car is not as "grippy" as you are "menthaly" used to. It quickly oversteers meaning that in a curve the frontwheels loose ground and the car takes to the outside of the curve. Can be corrected with a push to the gaspedal, so that the back turns throu... but this is not everyones choice. And if you break in such a situation, the car follows the "wrong" direction he has taken and the situation gets worse. The easiest thing, is to try the car outside of any dangerous roads in the snow to get the experience. I even drove the Evora with chains, then there is more grip from the back, but the front stays a bit tricky.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks everyone. I also have an Exige which I autox, so I'm familiar with a mid-engine layout and its desire to rotate.

I was primarily concerned with the actual ground clearance, the car's ability to "traverse" a snow drift, and traction. I suspect that traction is fairly good because there is more weight on the rear wheels. I've read a little bit of info on the front "bumper," but I wasn't clear. Is it the same as the Exige (i.e., all one piece and fiberglass), or is the bumper separate from the front clam and made of plastic like a regular bumper?

Also, is there enough room in the back for two front facing car seats (with or without the cushions)? I've got a 2 and 4 year old, and while they wouldn't be in the car much, they do have to fit inside.

Thanks again!
 

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I was going to mention the Lotus Ice Attack class. I so want to save money and go to that! Aside from the fact that Norway looks gorgeous, and they make great sweaters, I think driving an Evora on an ice track would be cool.

That said, do keep in mind that pretty much anyone in an all-season tire equipped SUV that tries to stop behind you on a hill IS going to bump you and crack your rear bumper... and they won't want to pay for it. You would be amazed at the number of fender benders that happen in DC on a snowy night. Like one every few minutes!

Personally, I would not take a Lotus out in snow other than a dire emergency, or for testing purposes on roads with little or no traffic. And make sure it is equipped with the correct wheels and the best possible snow tires.
 

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Thanks everyone. I also have an Exige which I autox, so I'm familiar with a mid-engine layout and its desire to rotate.

I was primarily concerned with the actual ground clearance, the car's ability to "traverse" a snow drift, and traction. I suspect that traction is fairly good because there is more weight on the rear wheels. I've read a little bit of info on the front "bumper," but I wasn't clear. Is it the same as the Exige (i.e., all one piece and fiberglass), or is the bumper separate from the front clam and made of plastic like a regular bumper?

Also, is there enough room in the back for two front facing car seats (with or without the cushions)? I've got a 2 and 4 year old, and while they wouldn't be in the car much, they do have to fit inside.

Thanks again!
I had no problems with the car traversing fair amounts of snow, but I wasn't driving in conditions as bad as shown in the snowboarder video. Actual ground clearance is better than the Elise (barely) - I think it's nearly 5 inches. I use the car to commute every day and never felt unsafe when driving cautiously in the snow. I even pushed the car beyond my personal safety limits to try to find its limit and it stuck just like it was dry ground. To me, the Evora feels magnitudes safer than the Elise in the same weather conditions.

The front bumper on the Evora is separate from the front clam. I don't think it's made of different material, but I do not know for certain. The factory shop manual does not seem to mention anything about it being a different material than the front clam.

As for car seats, there's a good thread with decent pictures here: http://www.lotustalk.com/forums/f170/anyone-use-child-seats-back-evora-93107/

Hope that helps, and good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So, I checked out an Evora at my local dealership. I *want* to buy the car, but truthfully I'm having a *really* hard figuring out how I could get two child seats in the back. I'm only about 5'11", but I honestly couldn't put the driver's seat in a position that was remotely comfortable for me that would also have any chance of my daughter fitting behind me.

Did I miss something? I didn't expect the rear seats to be spacious (at all), but there literally was literally only a couple of inches of space between the rear and front seats.
 

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I'm 6'0" and I can put the seat up to a point where I can still drive the car and fit a booster behind me (or even an adult), but it's not terribly comfortable. If you're talking about actual car seats rather than a booster, I have to agree with you - I just don't see a way you could get those to fit.

I had a booster for awhile but wanted to find something smaller for my kid. I found a thin and narrow one at Wal-Mart (of all places) that fits quite well. I think it was the Harmony Kids brand or something like that. I haven't done two boosters in the back seat though.

How often would you be driving with two kids in the back? If it's occasional, I would probably be willing. However, if you took the Evora with your kid(s) every day and had to always drive with the seat in an uncomfortable position, that might be difficult to live with. I would want to drive the car comfortably at least some of the time. :)

Best of luck in your decision though. My kid won't ride in my wife's car anymore because he loves the back of the Evora. He usually puts one foot up on the center armrest (shoes off, of course). One thing I found that can help with the rear occupancy limit is to adjust the rake of the front seats. The hard plastic back side of the front seats is a bit concave so there is actually more room for the legs for kids that it appears and adjusting the rake forward a bit opens up the cavity a decent amount.
 
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