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2011 Lotus Evora
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I saw this on the lotus forums and thought it was interesting enough to post here. Here’s someone selling his 2010 Evora with 100,000 miles. Nice to have evidence that they can go that long.

Here’s hoping that my used 2011 that I bought with ~8,000 will last that long. Since I only drive 5-8000 miles a year I should be good for 10 more years.

 

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Awesome. Looks like it's in pretty good shape too. 20,000 pounds is only about $26,000 USD.
 

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2011 Evora NA 6sp
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I'm halfway there.
 

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Good to see. I only skimmed, but the ad doesn’t seem to mention anything about clutch replacement(s). Wonder how many it’s had, or whether it’s on the original.
 

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Good to see. I only skimmed, but the ad doesn’t seem to mention anything about clutch replacement(s). Wonder how many it’s had, or whether it’s on the original.
Very likely original. At 50k mine was still functional and could have easily been nursed another 50k if I stopped racing. I only replaced because I do hard launches weekly.
 

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Just broken in. Used 2010 Camrys in my area range from 86k to 235k miles.
If you can avoid driving into things, there is nothing that is going to kill a car with a fiberglass body and aluminum chassis.
At 300k drop another RAV4 engine in and keep on trucking
 

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Good to see. I only skimmed, but the ad doesn’t seem to mention anything about clutch replacement(s). Wonder how many it’s had, or whether it’s on the original.
Clutches only go bad prematurely in the Evora when the master cylinder starts going bad, and that produces excess slip. If he addressed the MC early on (or got lucky), I'd be surprised if the clutch is not original.
 

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Just broken in. Used 2010 Camrys in my area range from 86k to 235k miles.
If you can avoid driving into things, there is nothing that is going to kill a car with a fiberglass body and aluminum chassis.
At 300k drop another RAV4 engine in and keep on trucking
I remember I saw couple owners on this site are nearing 100k. This is exactly why I brought the Evora and not any other exotic. I know the Toyota engine will last 250k+. If anything, engine can be replaced. Many of our families and friends that have Toyota with more than 250k miles and still runs well. I used to have a 1985 Toyota Corolla GTS that had 170K miles on the original clutch back in college.
 

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Clutches only go bad prematurely in the Evora when the master cylinder starts going bad, and that produces excess slip. If he addressed the MC early on (or got lucky), I'd be surprised if the clutch is not original.
It's in the UK, the rhd cars don't seem to have the MC failures like we do
 

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2020 Evora GT in Formula Red, coordinated black+red interior, windowed engine hatch
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I know the Toyota engine will last 250k+. Many of our families and friends that have Toyota with more than 250k miles and still runs well.
It's an automatic of course, but our Toyota Sienna minivan has the same basic V6 engine and it's at nearly 180K miles still purring like a kitten.

This is exactly why I brought the Evora and not any other exotic.
Agree 1000%! The moment I learned that Lotus was using a Toyota engine and transmission was the moment that ownership became a possibility and not just a dream. All the horror stories about in-house engines at Ferrari, etc. were enough to make them completely impractical for me. My nearest dealers for Lotus and all the other exotic brands are ~350 miles away, and the service costs are several bank accounts away. But worst case I can buy parts for Toyotas at any local parts store, can do my own light maintenance on such powertrains, and have a close friend who owns a Toyota shop that can handle heavier stuff. Suddenly Lotus ownership was possible!

I still don't quite understand why Lotus isn't more popular. It's like a comment I read elsewhere: "This is the car everyone says they want, but nobody buys." It's supercar performance at half or less supercar cost and will likely outlive most other supercars thanks to that Toyota drivetrain, aluminum chassis, and composite body. They should be selling many times more than they do. I don't know if it's poor marketing, an intentional effort to keep them "exclusive", etc.

If the theories that Lotus might piggyback on Volvo dealerships ever actually happens, and they keep building ICE vehicles, Lotus could be poised for some real growth. Here's hoping!!!
 

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I think it's a combination of poor marketing, minimal US dealer presence, and the fact they're still mostly hand-built turns a lot of people away. When was the last time you saw a commercial on any media platform for Lotus? That's one side of the coin. The other side is the "purists" that think having a commodity Toyota power plant and drivetrain are negatives.
 

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2020 Evora GT in Formula Red, coordinated black+red interior, windowed engine hatch
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Poor marketing - check. I'd go farther and say nearly-absent marketing. That takes money, but putting a demo Lotus in every Volvo showroom would be a relatively inexpensive way to get that ball rolling.

Minimal US dealer presence - check. But I think that's a secondary step. I doubt most people that are considering a new vehicle start the process by driving down their nearest "automobile avenue" looking for a sign with a recognized logo. They usually have a brand or model as a starting point, and that comes from promotional materials they saw/read somewhere. The old "brand awareness" thing. So I'm not sure that a bigger dealer network, by itself, would get the ball rolling. It's a vital component but without buyers there's no need for a network.

Hand-built... I hadn't thought of that as a turn-off. Do you really think so? Ferraris, Lambos, McLarens, and the like aren't exactly GM-production-line operations yet, are they? I know Porsches and their ilk are built in production volumes but as a direct result they're too commonplace to be considered exotic. Ferraris/Lambos/McLarens/Etc. still have that "exotic" cachet yet ship substantially higher volumes. Somehow Lotus needs to apply that business model.
 

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Hand-built... I hadn't thought of that as a turn-off. Do you really think so?
I personally don't, but I'm also mechanically-inclined and can sort out most issues myself. But vehicles that are hand-built are built by hands that vary, so there's always going to be variances between any 2 vehicles. That isn't always a good thing for reliability. There's a good percentage of buyers that just want to buy a vehicle that works, 100% of the time, without weird quirks, or having to visit the dealership often.

Ferraris/Lambos/McLarens/Etc. still have that "exotic" cachet yet ship substantially higher volumes. Somehow Lotus needs to apply that business model.
They market in other, less tangible, but highly effective ways. The sense of exclusivity or at least the air of, by the likes of celebrities, professional sports players, streamers/influencers, car magazines, etc. It's hard to break into that scene without having some insanely priced models that're out of reach of mere "mortals" yet sticks in the minds of the masses who like to dream. It would be easy enough to think those brands are popular or well-known because of their racing heritage/accolades, but I'd imagine 98% of the population that's heard of them have no idea of that history, nor care about it. Otherwise, they'd know the Lotus name as well.

Maybe the Evija will change all that, but I doubt it. If Lotus were smart, they'd somehow get one into the hands of a Kardashian/Jenner.
 

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2020 Evora GT in Formula Red, coordinated black+red interior, windowed engine hatch
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Speaking of "knowing history"... I've had quite a few people say "Isn't that the car that was in The Spy Who Loved Me" or "...Pretty Woman"? I've seen both of those movies and can't believe anyone remembered the brand of car, it just wasn't that big a part of the storyline. If Lotus is getting that much name recognition with relatively low profile appearances in somewhat (by today's calendar) dated movies, maybe they need to get their cars into a few more!
 

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Lotus needs to get some more demo units in the hands of Youtube car reviewers for their marketing. Reach a lot of the right people on the cheap.

Another thing not mentioned here is just that the interiors of the Evora is either a love it for its simplicity or hate it for not being a fully connected car. Lots of modern cars in the similar price point have plenty of tech that is absent on an Evora.
 

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2020 Evora GT in Formula Red, coordinated black+red interior, windowed engine hatch
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Another thing not mentioned here is just that the interiors of the Evora is either a love it for its simplicity or hate it for not being a fully connected car. Lots of modern cars in the similar price point have plenty of tech that is absent on an Evora.
That is a VERY astute observation. I'm definitely in the "less is more" category but I'm also in the minority on that topic. Even if we made Lotus a household name, a lot of folks - who think having a touchscreen in the door of a refrigerator (!?!) is a good thing - would be put off by their rather austere cockpits.

That pretty much consigns Lotus to its niche market. Which is a sad thing, because I suspect a lot of exotic car enthusiasts would be amazed at what Lotus would do for them as a driver's car. But your original point would probably take Lotus off their short list because they aren't thinking of it as a car, they're thinking of it as just another expression of their over-tech'd world. I wish that niche were large enough to support some serious growth for Lotus, but it may be that those in that niche already know of them.
 

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I think it's a combination of poor marketing, minimal US dealer presence, and the fact they're still mostly hand-built turns a lot of people away. When was the last time you saw a commercial on any media platform for Lotus? That's one side of the coin. The other side is the "purists" that think having a commodity Toyota power plant and drivetrain are negatives.
But the true purist would realize that only a few Lotus came with a Lotus engine, most were powered by Ford, Renault, Rover, Honda and Toyota
 

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But the true priest would realize that only a few Lotus came with a Lotus engine, most were powered by Ford, Renault, Rover, Honda and Toyota
I guess purist wasn't the right word. But imagine how much less of a following any other well-known luxury/exotic car brand would have if their engines were from a Honda Fit? Even if said engine was completely reworked, modified to output 800HP, and still be relatively fuel-efficient. I know I'd probably feel slightly different about a Mac or Aston if that was the power plant.

But to @IDEngineer's point, I too found that the Toyota engine and trans to be a huge positive when I was shopping for my Evora.
 

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2020 Evora GT in Formula Red, coordinated black+red interior, windowed engine hatch
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But imagine how much less of a following any other well-known luxury/exotic car brand would have if their engines were from a Honda Fit? Even if said engine was completely reworked, modified to output 800HP, and still be relatively fuel-efficient. I know I'd probably feel slightly different about a Mac or Aston if that was the power plant.
And yet that's such an odd perspective to have. Let's take it to a whole new level of performance: How many aircraft manufacturers make their own engines? Boeing and Airbus don't (in the passenger realm). None of the US-based military aircraft manufacturers do. In general aviation Cessna, Piper, Beech, etc. all buy their engines from others. Same is true in the boating world too.

As an Engineer, this makes perfect sense to me. There are existing, proven, excellent engine manufacturers out there. They've already spent the money to develop powerplants in a wide range of sizes, any of which can be (like Lotus does with the Toyota V6) modified/accessorized to match the specific application. If you're an exotic car company, why duplicate all of that effort? Why not instead focus YOUR R&D resources on your unique, differentiating characteristics? Lotus is known for handling and extreme power-to-weight - it's smart to focus on those core competencies while leveraging the existing expertise and high-volume economies of scale of engine manufacturers.

I'm not a Marketing guy so I'm not sure how to position this. But it sure seems to me that a winning marketing campaign could be built from this. Lotus has absolutely nothing to apologize for. Indeed, their position is intelligent and enviable. Virtually the entire automotive world acknowledges that Toyota engine technology is some of the best in the world. Maybe Lotus should shout that from the rooftops, do a PR campaign WITH Toyota, and grab the mantle as "The most reliable exotic brand". The Lotus driving experience plus Toyota reliability. Unless you're looking to brag about how much time and money your supercar wastes in the shop, that would seem to be a darned positive combination. It certainly sold me!

But hey, I'm just a humble Engineer and not a Marketing guy.
 

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The trouble in some minds is that LoTus DID develop engines for a time in middle history, famous engines starting with the Lotus Twin Cam (based on Ford Kent block), then onto the 900 series of 2 and 2,2L 4's and 3.5 and 4.0 L V-8's. Chapman helped startup Cosworth (ex Lotus employees Costin & Duckworth) continue developing heads for the Kent Block which pioneered the way to teh DFV F1 engine. But in the grand scheme, it was just a portion of the companies output.
 
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