The Lotus Cars Community banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well, after getting locked out of my trunk (twice!) in the last couple of weeks, I thought I might pass along what I learned about the Evora trunk latch and (perhaps) help some other folks out.
The trunk latch can be accessed after removing the plastic trim panel at the back of the boot and is secure by two 6mm bolts. it has three cables attached to it, all of which can be pried off (at your own risk!). The main cable attached directly to the tail of the hammer mechanism is connected to a strong solenoid - that's what you activate when you push the key button twice. There's a second tail flap that pushes on (but is not attached to) the main hammer, and the cable hidden under the rear seat is attached to that, as well as another short cable that has a handle in the boot itself (presumably for all the kids you stuff into the trunk after the back seat fills up) that can be used to release the lid from inside the boot.
When the lid comes down, it latches onto the horseshoe of the release mechanism, and a small bar protrudes from the hood latch. It's this bar that the hammer needs to strike when it is activated, and it's a pretty narrow, vertical target - so if things get out of alignment, no amount of cable pulling is going to release the trunk. In pic 1 you can see the mechanics when its all working right:
https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=1228506

In simpler form, here's the hammer in it's normal position, then when its pulled by the solenoid or cable (Pic 2 and 3):
https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=1228508
https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=1228510

In my case, the hammer had loosened so much on the shaft that it was just flopping around when I finally got it out. What I found was that all the pieces that pivot on the shaft are held in place by a simple grip washer in pic 4:
https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=1228512

Which had backed off at least a couple of millimeters, allowing the hammer to flop all over. The whole latch mechanism was pretty bent up, probably from me yanking on the rear seat cable, which didn't help.

Straightening the bracket was a real clue - I was able to bend it back with my hands, no tools! This is not the heavy duty component here. After straightening and realigning everything, I began to wonder how long it would be before I was back here again with the same problem, so I let my mind wander a bit around the idea of holding the hammer lever more firmly (and permanently) on the shaft. With a little experimentation, I found that the shaft could be threaded with a 6mmx1.0 die most of the way down until the die handle hits the cable bracket., like so:
https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=1228514

*To be continued...*
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Evora Trunk Hatch (cont)

With the levers in place, and using a nylon spacer for low friction contact, we can now use a nut to hold the assembly in place. Using locktite red on the nut will let you adjust the pressure on the levers and keep the nut in place (Pic 1).
https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=1228516

That's all fine, but we just filled the space that the OEM return spring is supposed to fit into. So I pulled out my spring drawers and started rummaging through all the different options. At first I had a good coil spring that I was going to attach from the back of the cable holder into a hole that I drilled in the frame (Pic 2).
https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=1228518

That probably would've worked okay, but then I found this in pic 3:
https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=1228520

What're the odds, right? This is probably some brake return spring off of a 1982 Honda CB160 or something. Sometimes I wonder why I keep accumulating bins of this stuff and sometimes, I don't.
After putting an s-bend in the tail and rounding off the groove it would sit in, the spring worked well and snapped the hammer right back - hopefully, it wouldn't be too strong for the solenoid. It seemed a little sloppy though, and I didn't want it flying off when I wasn't looking, so I took one more step:
https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=1228522

That felt better. So I mounted everything up, replaced the plastic trim, adjusted the rubber bumpers, and confidently dropped the lid.

*Cha-chunk* (On the key). Nothing. *Cha-chunk*... Cha-chunk*...

You've gotta be kidding me.

So there I was, removing the trunk lid from the hinges again, one painful flat at a time. None of this made any easier by the beautiful Radium catch cans mounted EXACTLY where my hands needed to go through the sail panel vent. Grrrrrrrrr........

So like I said at the beginning, that tab that protrudes out of the lid catch is a narrow vertical target, and I just learned the hard way that the release mechanism needs to be SPACED from the body in order to align with the tab and hit it. Don't do what I did!!https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/images/smilies/facepalm.gif

Three fender washers on each side of the release bracket did the job, and now I (carefully!) lowered the lid into place, held my breath and *POPPED* the trunk open. WHEW!

So that's the story of the boot release. Hopefully some of the pics will help you to see how everything works and help you figure out what's going on with yours. If you can come up with a spring, I think the threaded rod will be a little more permanent. Happy Driving!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks you guys. I know I have certainly gotten a lot of help and understanding from other guys posts, so I was hoping that this post would make things a little easier for somebody else. And having the boot stuck closed is really a maddening (and can be expensive!) experience, so if I can save a few guys from that, I'm happy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Need a bit of help

So, I've had an issue with my lotus evora getting the trunk open. The release cable won't work neither would the fob, or button release. So I get the trunk open with the latches at the back of the car, however now I've run into a bit of a problem. I can lift the trunk lid however the latch for the trunk still won't release. I've tried pushing in the striker on the side and no benefit, the light comes on as if the trunk is open however the latch and loop won't release. Any ideas? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Hi Mondeep,
I responded to your email, but somehow it ended up in my own inbox, even though it showed *******wayne.edu as the recipient. Hope I can help here.
First we need to create consistent word definitions. Look at the first picture. The part that I call the "hammer" is the part that's curled like a question mark, on the right side. I think that's what you mean by the "striker". That part doesn't actually release the trunk lid, it just strikes a flat plate on the edge (the latch), and that latch has a cutout that captures the "horseshoe" bar of the trunk lid.
So lets take the striker/hammer out of the picture. What we need to do to release the trunk is hit the latch plate right were the hammer would hit it, and rotate it over so it releases the horseshoe. The challenge with this is that, at the same time, we are lifting the trunk lid to try to give ourselves enough room to get in there, and this puts a lot of pressure on the latch, making it hard to release.
If you can get someone to help you hold the lid, or put some wood blocks under it when its cracked just enough, you'll have both hands to wield the crowbar, hopefully without having too much pressure on the latch.
One thought that might be worth considering (and I say "might" because this has it's own risks involved) - once you have the trunk lid off, you might want to remove the sail panel while you are finding out what's causing the problem. With the sail panel removed, you have much easier access to the bolts that hold the trunk lid. The danger here is that that darn sail panel has some of the most fragile mounting brackets known to man, and it's VERY easy to break them when you're installing - or even removing - the sail panel. I'll let you decide if you think it's worth it.
Once you have the hammer mechanism out, check it for looseness/floppiness/alignment and try to be sure it is lined up with the latchplate when installed. If you don't want to go to the lengths that I did, you can still fully clean and dry the mechanism, rough up the shaft, push the friction washer tight and (carefully) apply some epoxy to keep that washer in place (no glue on the pivot point!). Let is set completely before putting a couple of drops of oil on the pivot points. That should help prevent the hammer from failing again.
Hope that helps! Let us know how you do, or if you learn anything new you can share!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Evora Trunk Hatch (cont)

With the levers in place, and using a nylon spacer for low friction contact, we can now use a nut to hold the assembly in place. Using locktite red on the nut will let you adjust the pressure on the levers and keep the nut in place (Pic 1).
https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=1228516

That's all fine, but we just filled the space that the OEM return spring is supposed to fit into. So I pulled out my spring drawers and started rummaging through all the different options. At first I had a good coil spring that I was going to attach from the back of the cable holder into a hole that I drilled in the frame (Pic 2).
https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=1228518

That probably would've worked okay, but then I found this in pic 3:
https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=1228520

What're the odds, right? This is probably some brake return spring off of a 1982 Honda CB160 or something. Sometimes I wonder why I keep accumulating bins of this stuff and sometimes, I don't.
After putting an s-bend in the tail and rounding off the groove it would sit in, the spring worked well and snapped the hammer right back - hopefully, it wouldn't be too strong for the solenoid. It seemed a little sloppy though, and I didn't want it flying off when I wasn't looking, so I took one more step:
https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=1228522

That felt better. So I mounted everything up, replaced the plastic trim, adjusted the rubber bumpers, and confidently dropped the lid.

Cha-chunk (On the key). Nothing. Cha-chunk... Cha-chunk*...

You've gotta be kidding me.

So there I was, removing the trunk lid from the hinges again, one painful flat at a time. None of this made any easier by the beautiful Radium catch cans mounted EXACTLY where my hands needed to go through the sail panel vent. Grrrrrrrrr........

So like I said at the beginning, that tab that protrudes out of the lid catch is a narrow vertical target, and I just learned the hard way that the release mechanism needs to be SPACED from the body in order to align with the tab and hit it. Don't do what I did!!https://www.lotustalk.com/forums/images/smilies/facepalm.gif

Three fender washers on each side of the release bracket did the job, and now I (carefully!) lowered the lid into place, held my breath and POPPED the trunk open. WHEW!

So that's the story of the boot release. Hopefully some of the pics will help you to see how everything works and help you figure out what's going on with yours. If you can come up with a spring, I think the threaded rod will be a little more permanent. Happy Driving!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Hello
I’ve got the same problem...
What do you mean by: “The trunk latch can be accessed after removing the plastic trim panel at the back of the boot”?
Thank you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
881 Posts
Lotus does not do well with trunk release latch mechanisms (putting it mildly). Our '12 worked somewhat better than our 400 '18.

I no longer use the key fob to open the trunk - some silly required precise amount of pause between button presses. Makes no sense. I use the open button on the driver side door. It always requires three button presses to open the trunk. But at least it opens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Lotus does not do well with trunk release latch mechanisms (putting it mildly). Our '12 worked somewhat better than our 400 '18.

I no longer use the key fob to open the trunk - some silly required precise amount of pause between button presses. Makes no sense. I use the open button on the driver side door. It always requires three button presses to open the trunk. But at least it opens.
Does the 400 require you to have the key in the ignition in order to use the interior trunk release button? That's one of the most annoying things about my S. What's the point of having the button if you have to have the key on you to use it anyways? (first world problems, I know...)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
587 Posts
Does the 400 require you to have the key in the ignition in order to use the interior trunk release button? That's one of the most annoying things about my S. What's the point of having the button if you have to have the key on you to use it anyways? (first world problems, I know...)
No, you can open it without the key in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Thanks guys
but the problem is that the trunk does not open although the relay is working, the latch does not releas.
The insi cable is loose (can you imagine my luck?)
So is there any chance if we disassemble the rear bumper or rear diffuser?
I am here at Lotus Lisbon/Portugal, and any insed info will be very much appreciated.
Thanks a lot!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
If the latch won't release, the other option that has been used in the past is unbolt the hatch hinges, either from underneath or via the wheel wells, or by breaking out the 2 side vents on the sail panel. Once the hinges are unbolted, you can tilt the hatch rearward.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top