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Hi All,

I have a 2010 Elise SC. Once the temperature is around 80C, I tend to give it a bit of a flogging. Especially through the lower gears as it's robot-to-robot kind of stuff. She goes like a scalded cat. How hard can one drive them because this one just wants to be driven.

Thanks for any and all advice.

John Sourcer
 

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www.theapexinn.com
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The Elise has bigger balls than the driver.....just don't drive it past YOUR limit.
 

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As with any car, it's more about the drivers limits vs the cars limits

A great driver can make a slow car fast

A bad driver can make a fast car slow

Best bet is if you haven't done so, spend a weekend at a drivers school and learn your limits
 

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2011 Persian Blue Elise R(S)
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Smartest thing I ever did was take my 2011 onto the track 3 months after I bought her, that's when you find out what these cars can do! But as everybody points out, it's your limits that you need to monitor (oh yeah, and the toe links!).
 

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Jonny Law and preservation instinct set the upper limits for the street
 

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On the street, anything past the speed limit is WRONG (are you listing Big Brother??)

I have had my car for thee years (NA Elise), and on dry public roads the car is more than capable for any/all safe driving. (Its not how fast you go but how you go fast).

Now, on the track. Well there are dozens of drivers at your local track every weekend trying to answer just that question.
 

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since I hav never driven on the track yet, never drifted a car yet on purpose, I hav been trying to sense the feel for when the rear tires are/might want to release for my own defensive/safety
 

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since I hav never driven on the track yet, never drifted a car yet on purpose, I hav been trying to sense the feel for when the rear tires are/might want to release for my own defensive/safety
Then you really should attend a high performance driving school. That is the best environment to learn the limits.

The Elise has such high handling capabilities that you either have to drive it well above posted speeds or aggressively provoke it (ex. an abrupt lift at high rpm, etc.) in order to get near its limits. A school will get you there safely, with expert instruction, in an environment where the the risks to you and others are well-managed.
 

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Oh I know you are so right, it is on my todo list when time affords, I should say that what I mentioned has been low risks areas & at reasonable speeds, but you are right in every way
 

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The clutch and transmission don't like hard shifts. With the right tires, hard cornering is a must, otherwise, you are cheating yourself. Oil pump, valve springs and valves distinctly dislike blown shifts, example: Thinking you are going from 6th to 4th to get into your powerband, but hitting second instead.
 

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Well, the intake cam will likely wipe the big lobes out for ya.<---this happened to mine
The heads of the valves could break off and knock a huge freaking whole in your piston.<---This also happened to mine.
The shift cables will stretch and make it hard to find the right gear if you don't baby it.<---This happened to mine.
The oil pump gears don't like being revved up much and I've heard of some exploding.
If you are low on fuel don't make hard left turns for any extended duration, and if you don't have a g-pan don't make any hard right turns for any extended duration.

If you are cresting a hill and there is a corner in front of you and you are at high RPM's don't take you foot off the throttle ( you will crash if you do ) put your other foot on the clutch instead <------ if you're scared and must slow down.

Remove the rear tow links to check for any wear on the inner studs and be sure to TORQUE them well when they go back in. (if they had been loose they will have been rubbing on the mounting hole until they break off and try to kill you.)

Replace the brake lines with the stainless steel ones. The stock ones will probably try to kill you.

Just so you know, not all cars are gonna have the problems I've had. When I go around corners I usually do it on 3 wheels, safely of course<----my little way of conserving rubber.

Welcome to the fold!
 

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I think DWebb may mean to left foot brake while keeping on the gas. I don't see where putting your "other" (than normal? right?/ left?) foot on the clutch is going to accomplish anything other than blow up your motor while you spin, but if it does, I would like to learn more, so please, carry on ...

And as DWebb says, welcome to the fold!
 

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Noggin at Kyalami Marshalls tonight and breakfast run on Sunday morning. Join us to find out!
 

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THe car is better than the driver 9/10th's of the time! An SC till you have the proper skills is an excuse for talent. 8 yrs and 50+/- track days and shes very happy! Has proven tougher and more reliable than my STi was!
 

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I would suggest some type of driving course. The car will tke more than you can handle as a novice. Some low level training at least will help you understand the car's dynamics. These are amazing machines, but unless you have intimate understanding of how she reacts or will react, let someone who knows show you how to react to situations under diress.
 

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>I think DWebb may mean to left foot brake while keeping on the gas.

Or he might mean what he says. I do.

>I don't see where putting your "other" (than normal? right?/ left?) foot on the clutch is going to accomplish anything other than blow up your motor while you spin, but if it does, I would like to learn more, so please, carry on ...

Well, you DO have to be smart enough to take your foot off the power when you step on the clutch.
 

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Yes, you must unlearn some of your basic reflexes. If you cook a corner too hot, braking while in the turn will likely end in a spin and much sadness. (Look up "snap oversteer").
 

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I would suggest some type of driving course. The car will tke more than you can handle as a novice. Some low level training at least will help you understand the car's dynamics. These are amazing machines, but unless you have intimate understanding of how she reacts or will react, let someone who knows show you how to react to situations under diress.
An autocross novice school would be ideal.

Failing that, an autocross Test & Tune would be great. Find an instructor there and stick to him or her like glue. Ride with other folks, particularly instructors, and do whatever it takes to get an instructor in your car.

If you were in the Twin Cities area, I'd tell you to meet me this Saturday at the DCTC T&T.
 
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