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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to start towing my Elise, as there is no reputable shop near me, for track prep, repairs etc

I want to chop in my Explorer for a F150 v F250(gas) v F250 (diesel). I'm told the gas 250 has the frame strength needed if not the torque of the diesel...but I've always liked the F150.

Thoughts?
 

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The Elise does not weigh alot so you could do any of the three. The diesel is really for people that want to tow heavy trailers. The F150 will work better if you get aluminum trailer as it is lighter.
 

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What sort of trailer are you planning to pull? Big difference in a flat-bed aluminum Featherlight and a 26' enclosed steel trailer.

I have a 20' enclosed steel and tow it with a V8 Pathfinder. Definitely not ideal but the Pathfinder is the biggest thing I'm willing to daily drive. I figure my whole rig weighs about 6k lbs when fully loaded, my Pathy is rated to tow 7800. It tows fine but I average - 7mpg. Ugh. Hell I only get 15 on the street...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I guess the lightest I can get, it would be open aluminium, it wont be towed THAt far

it traveled from Seattle to SLC on an open trailer and I wont be towing it far anytime soon :)

2007 F150 with a 5.4, tow pkg and 3.55 gears had a tow rating of 7,800lbs, which sounds enough for an Elise + Ally open trailer + small trackside toolbox
 

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Most likely you'll be able to get away with the F150. If you're going to two 15k+ miles a year I'd suggest the diesel.

And other factors are how long you'll keep the truck and how much you pay for it.

Personally, I have an E350 van. I like it because I can haul a lot of spares and keep them dry, and I can sleep in it comfortably if it comes to it.
 

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The gas should be fine if that's your preference for around town, non-towing duty, cost, model, style, etc. Suggest trying the diesel though and see if it suits you.

Definitely get the backup camera and integrated brake controller options; camera is great for hooking up the trailer by yourself. I know here even an aluminum open trailer with my ~2,000 lb Plus 2 would require electric brakes; your state may be different but well worth the $200 to have the capability on your tow vehicle, and electric brakes are a good feature.

I towed my Esprit V8 (~3,000 lb) on an incredibly heavy steel rental flat bed trailer from Calgary to Vancouver and back. I guess thats about 600 miles and three mountain ranges each way. Used my 2011 Ford E150 gas Econoline Van and it towed fine. I think it's 'official' tow rating is around 7,200 lb, but it feels pretty maxed with our 5,400 lb travel trailer camper. It only has a three speed plus OD transmission; I believe the F150 comes with a better transmission option and maybe a better V8?

I guess this is the last year for the venerable Econoline, so they never upgraded the drivetrains. Over fifty year product run.

Stu
 

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diesel is always the first choice... but the question is, is the all the extra cost, worth the benefit. if your towing a light car, little spares and tools and minimal trailer.... there are no economics to make that needed.

f150... or any of the chevy/dodge equivalents - be sure to put the biggest tranny cooler you can.
 

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I towed my saabs behind my 04 Yukon xl on a dual axle flatbed trailer numerous times w/o a issue. The cars weigh 2600# and 3050# and I. Would get 12-14 mpg going 70ish on the highway......

If you do not plan on driving very many miles a year there is no need for the more expensive to purchase as well as maintain diesel. Yes it will take you longer and yes the mpg will not be as good in a gas truck but you will still make it. Heck... My 38ft and 20,000lb motor home pulls my wrangler unlimited w/o any issues... Except for being slow up any hill and I get 6-8 mpg going 70-75mph.

Just try to get something with a towing rating of at least 5,000lbs preferable closer to 7,000 lbs. A Elise at 2,000 lb plus a 1,500 lb trailer and another 1,000 lbs of stuff in the car (driver, passenger, tools, gas, etc) puts you close to 5k lbs
 
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