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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm seriously considering making my own side sills very similar to these: http://www.lotustalk.com/forums/f157/diy-side-sills-165625/ and I am looking for the very best fastener choice.

The OP thread mentions M6 rivet nuts but I'd want to be sure that these are indeed the best method of attachment (though I'm likely to use aluminum stock slightly thicker than .100").

My other concern is drilling under the sill area. Again, the OP smartly used a drill stop, but I hope he wasn't just lucky not to hit an oil line or something. Is there anything else that I should consider so I don't f---- something up?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
0.100!!!!!!! or thicker?????? -eek- :eek: -eek- :eek:
Do you realize that most of the structure in a Boeing 747 is only 0.040" thick?

This is a Lotus, not an aircraft tug...
The skin of an aircraft is not "structural" the way it is in this application. In aircraft, bulkheads and stringers conduct most most of the loads while the skin serves as a force to wrap it all together. That's why old airplanes were made with nothing much more than spruce and fabric...

The side skirts need to cantilever out from the underside rigidly without flapping in the wind and they cannot crumple or warp the first time someone inadvertently pushes on them. Frankly, I'd rather sacrifice .25 pounds of extra weight for a piece that doesn't need to be replaced every time something brushes against it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Back to the question of the OP... How about Well Nuts? I'm wondering if the expanding rubber of these fasteners might be easier to use and less likely to crack the fiberglass.
 

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When drilling watch for AC, oil, and brake lines although brake lines are less likely to hit than the other two.

I hit an AC line (barely touched it and the knick went through) but luckily it was the one I was replacing anyways.

Use a drill stop but set it so the bit barely pierces all the way through the sill and then finish by hand with drill bit and pliers or vise grips.

I used rivnuts.


Sent from AutoGuide.com App
 

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The skin of an aircraft is not "structural" the way it is in this application. In aircraft, bulkheads and stringers conduct most most of the loads while the skin serves as a force to wrap it all together. That's why old airplanes were made with nothing much more than spruce and fabric...

The side skirts need to cantilever out from the underside rigidly without flapping in the wind and they cannot crumple or warp the first time someone inadvertently pushes on them. Frankly, I'd rather sacrifice .25 pounds of extra weight for a piece that doesn't need to be replaced every time something brushes against it.
:facepalm
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So what am I missing here... Either I'm really supposed to consider using material that is paper thin, or I totally missed some killer sarcastic wit that is somehow connected to Boeing 747s and aircraft tugs... :huh:
 
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