The Lotus Cars Community banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,323 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Rob Siegel writes for "Roundel" and is on the Hagerty web page.

Carbuff and I really like his articles. While I can't post his "Roundel" pieces here, I can point you to his Hagerty stuff:

Choosing the right fuel will protect your classic

https://www.hagerty.com/articles-videos/articles/2018/08/13/choosing-the-right-fuel-for-your-classic



A trick to removing stripped Allen-key bolts can be a game of 0.003 inches

https://www.hagerty.com/articles-videos/articles/2018/07/09/removing-a-stripped-allen-key-bolt


The best advice for exhaust work: Replace it all

https://www.hagerty.com/articles-videos/articles/2018/07/16/advice-for-exhaust-work
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,323 Posts
Discussion Starter #2

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,323 Posts
Discussion Starter #3

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,323 Posts
Discussion Starter #4

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,323 Posts
Discussion Starter #5

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,323 Posts
Discussion Starter #6

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,323 Posts
Discussion Starter #7

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,323 Posts
Discussion Starter #8

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,323 Posts
Discussion Starter #9

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,323 Posts
Discussion Starter #10

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,323 Posts
Discussion Starter #11

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,323 Posts
Discussion Starter #12

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,323 Posts
Discussion Starter #13

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,323 Posts
Discussion Starter #14

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
528 Posts
Can't disagree with anything he wrote, but do wonder why he didn't mention pre-oiling engines that you can. Lots of old designs use a spur gear turning a shaft with the distributor on one end and the oil pump on the other. It's usually pretty easy to fake the distributor drive end of this shaft (or just use a distributor shaft with the gear removed) and use a portable drill to get operating oil pressure into the engine while it's sitting still. A shot of oil down each spark plug hole plus this is about the best possible way to bring a long-dead engine back to life.

For best effect, you slowly turn the engine through two revolutions by hand while running the oil pump. This gets all the cross drillings to line up and oil everything thoroughly.

On the Toyota S engine in my Celica (5S-FE) the oil pump is driven by the cam belt. You can pre-oil the engine by removing the cam belt and spinning the pump sprocket with a 12mm socket on the sprocket mounting nut. Works a treat.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,323 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
He later added hint to pour oil into cylinders, but that's it.

GOOD tip on pre-oiling, SP.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,879 Posts
Can't disagree with anything he wrote, but do wonder why he didn't mention pre-oiling engines that you can. Lots of old designs use a spur gear turning a shaft with the distributor on one end and the oil pump on the other. It's usually pretty easy to fake the distributor drive end of this shaft (or just use a distributor shaft with the gear removed) and use a portable drill to get operating oil pressure into the engine while it's sitting still. A shot of oil down each spark plug hole plus this is about the best possible way to bring a long-dead engine back to life.

For best effect, you slowly turn the engine through two revolutions by hand while running the oil pump. This gets all the cross drillings to line up and oil everything thoroughly.

On the Toyota S engine in my Celica (5S-FE) the oil pump is driven by the cam belt. You can pre-oil the engine by removing the cam belt and spinning the pump sprocket with a 12mm socket on the sprocket mounting nut. Works a treat.
You can also simulate this by disconnecting the fuel injectors and running it over a few times. You don't want to have the injectors going with the spark plug disconnected because this can lead to washing the cylinder walls
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,323 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Rob:

Yeah, the drill method is often discussed. I'm not as sanguine about it as other folks. I think the best method is spinning the engine itself.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
528 Posts
Rob:

Yeah, the drill method is often discussed. I'm not as sanguine about it as other folks. I think the best method is spinning the engine itself.
I generally do this too - after I've pre-oiled the engine. I really want a good cushion of oil on the rod and main bearings and in the cam galleries. As a bonus, it also often helps pump up flatted hydraulic lifters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,451 Posts
Good stuff to know. I am at the stage where disassembly on a old Jaguar is complete. Say hypothetically I had the valve cover off, where would I try to get some oil in there? Going to do everything else, Marvel Mystery Oil in cylinders, turn engine using crank pulley.

I am afraid of using too much Marvel Mystery oil. Car has not ran in over 7 years, but no reason to expect copious amounts of surface rust in cylinders.

I don't want to glaze my new plugs, royal pain in ass x12...
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top