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Discussion Starter #1
Good morning!

Been shopping around for a while now (not much in canada), and with my price range around 60k CDN, my options are slim. Theres def more options with the auto transmission.

Now with all the crazy clutch costs I keep hearing about, and the good chance I might have to buy this car sight unseen, im pretty worried that I could have issues with the clutch. And am seriously considering the auto instead.

I want a 6 spd. And I also definitely want an "S"
Never driven a paddle shifter but seems like people like them. This would be just a weekend car to go out on date night, family cruises, and the odd car show. Watching the YouTube videos they do look pretty fun gearing while both hands on the wheel!

My question is Would, Would i be disappointed with the supercharged, paddle shifter model?
 

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I want a 6 spd. And I also definitely want an "S"
I don't have an automatic. And, I've never driven one. But, if you truly want a 6 Speed, than I wouldn't settle and possibly regret it later. Of course, that's only my opinion.

Also, the clutch is probably the most expensive (consumable part) repair. So, if you are worried about the clutch life, then I would either:

a. Decide on the exact car I want, work out the deal and make sure I drive the car prior to final purchase arrangements. ( I would not buy a used sports car sight unseen but that's just me. A new car is different of course.)

b. Pay for a thorough PPI by a trusted facility.

c. Set aside $ for potential repairs.

Actually, I did "c" myself even though I purchased new figuring after the warranty ran out I may need repairs. But, I've never had to touch those funds and figure I'll just use the $ as a down payment on my next car.

Any used car is a crap shoot. Heck, any new car is a crap shoot. They are mechanical and eventually EVERYTHING mechanical will break. But, I look at it that if you prepare yourself ahead of time, the hit doesn't hurt quite as much.

Something else that MAY help is trying to find a car being sold by an active forum member. (Not a member who just joined to pump up posts and list a car for sale.) Many members have been around for a while and you can get a feel for how they treat their cars, their mechanical capabilities, and how their vehicles are maintained. If I was looking, I would prefer buying from a forum member who can also provide the full car history. Many times, dealers know absolutely nothing about a car that may have been traded in.

Well, that's my advice. Others will have different opinions. But, best of luck with your search!
 

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Try an IPS first. I have both. In day to day driving, unless you are driving around in 2nd/3rd aggressively, you will lose to an auto everytime. In sport mode the IPS NA car feels every bit as fast as my track modded S manual car.
 

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If I had to do it over again, I would have bought another IPS. I enjoyed the Elise, but at my age automatic shifting is much easier, having auto on our other cars. Starting smoothly from a stop going up hill .. Other than that, it is fun to go through the gears.
 

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As power levels go up, I find myself considering an auto. I first noticed it in my M100, the 1-2 shift happens so fast, that you are still turning when accelerating from a dead stop and turning left, for instance. So you are removing a hand from the wheel mid corner and it is a PITA. When 0-60 times were 6 seconds or more you just don't run into it as often, but at 4 seconds, and that shift happening in less than 3 it can make the car a handful, or you just slow down, which is not maximum fun.

I have not gotten the chance to drive a DCG, that to me is probably needed when you get to a certain power level.

I'd like to see some reviews of BOEs auto kit, that might be a decider for someone who feels a standard auto is too squishy
 

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You describe this as your fun car. What does the transmission really factor into the fun FOR YOU. If you care, don't compromise, if you don't you can be flexible. Introspection is in order, my good sir. As @2011 chrome orange says, buying a used car is a crap shoot every time, this is part of the reason that they are cheaper than new cars. You should figure on some $$ for repairs no matter what transmission you buy.

If you're concerned about a systemic problem with all manual Evoras, the only thing I'd say is don't get too caught up in what the internet tells you. Fear is a strong motivator and people love to latch onto it.
 

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2020 Evora GT in Formula Red, coordinated black+red interior, windowed engine hatch
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I read somewhere that the uptake on Evora transmissions is something like 70% manual and 30% automatic. That tells you about the demographics of Evora owners... and there aren't a lot of Lotus buyers out there in the first place... so if you think you may ever want to sell you'll have an easier time finding a buyer for a manual.

I agree with the recommendations that you consider why you want this car. Speaking solely for me, there's zero chance I'd buy an automatic Lotus - or any other sports car for that matter. An automatic dumbs down the experience; it's like riding a snowmobile, there's only one user input. "Push for fast, release for slow." Borrrrrring. Just buy a minivan, the driving is the same (steering wheel and gas pedal) and you get more cargo capacity. But that's just me, and my personal opinion. YMMV. Figure out what is important for YOU, and spend your money accordingly.
 

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Theres def more options with the auto transmission.
As others have said, the root cause of clutch failure was found and a fix exists that is far, far cheaper than a replacement clutch. That being said, also consider the long-term cost of selling an auto Evora. What you've started to see is that, despite the higher option cost of the automatic, they've depreciated more than their manual brethren. This is likely why you're finding more options in your budget since there were actually more manuals sold. I can't confirm the 70/30 rate mentioned above, but it supports my logic so I'll go with it ;). Those original auto owners have probably lost more money than the manual owners who even had to replace a clutch at $8k or thereabouts when you consider paying $3k upfront then losing some on the back end as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Pretty much my thoughts already! Haha. Appreciate the advice and gives me a bit to think about.

Most likely will hold out for a 6spd unless a auto white S comes around. Then I dont think ill be able to stop myself.

For the auto owners, fun to drive? Do you switch to the paddles/sport often?
 

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The auto is a fine box, shifts are good. However, the bigger decision point is reliability. Auto tranny may be correlated to more reliability issues - read up on wiring harness issues. And no, they were not fixed after the early cars, they were continued problems right into the 400 generation.
 

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2020 Evora GT in Formula Red, coordinated black+red interior, windowed engine hatch
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Most likely will hold out for a 6spd unless a auto white S comes around. Then I dont think ill be able to stop myself.
Ewww... plain old white? It will look like every rental car, every fleet truck, every generic "too cheap to pay for anything but the default color" car to roll out of Detroit. To each his own, and I understand it's a personal thing, but nothing screams "generic" to me like white on a car. Any car. Not even a Lotus overcomes the stigma of titanium dioxide.

The auto is a fine box, shifts are good.
In fairness, many reviews of the auto I've read use phrases like "reliable but boring" and "shift points seem a little off". I'd totally trust the Toyota reliability but this is supposed to be a sports car. Except maybe when equipped with an auto transmission? Then it's not a sports car anymore?
 

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I was torn but the auto was in the color I wanted and I had a left leg injury that was acting up when I was shopping so I took it as a sign.

I track often and the paddles are great, the shifts fast enough for HDPE and the the downshift sounds are intoxicating especially after the decat.

Occasionally, I wonder if the additional "engagement experience" of a manual would make it a little better, but I have no regrets.

If the nostalgia of shifting is important, then get the manual.

In another decade, just the sound of and engine and exhaust will be nostalgic.
 

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Ewww... plain old white? It will look like every rental car, every fleet truck, every generic "too cheap to pay for anything but the default color" car to roll out of Detroit. To each his own, and I understand it's a personal thing, but nothing screams "generic" to me like white on a car. Any car. Not even a Lotus overcomes the stigma of titanium dioxide.
couldn’t disagree more!

I do not look at or think I am being to cheap for not wanting to pay for a different color, it’s just a fact of life and also personal preference. I do not have deep pockets and the extra $3k-$8k + for a non white or non red GT (which are both the “default” colors) just isn’t worth the extra cost to me.


i have taken two evora’ s for a spin, a white 400 which I didn’t think I would like, just wanted to drive the car and it was the closest dealership. In person I was shocked by how much I liked the manual white 400 with carbon pack 2... then a year later I drove a red auto GT which is the original color I wanted. This shop also had a white GT with red wheels in their show which online I didn’t think I would like. In person, wow .... I was shocked by how much better the white GT looked, couldn’t believe how great red wheels looked in the car.... always thought red wheels belonged on civic’s ...lol....

that being said, maybe it’s the part of the country you are in, in my part of the country, most rental cars are not white, they are black, red, blue, silver & grey.
 

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My daily is a Honda Civic Si, only available in six speed manual. To me “driver engagement” is the whole thing with a sporty car, and that means me doing stuff, not riding along. The feel of the power train in my left foot is rewarding. Sure I miss some shifts, but I’m alive with the car.

However, above the power level of a 400 my mistakes begin to have greater consequences. About there I’m good with an “auto”, and the real dual clutch get to be plenty fun. The “inertia push” of our McLaren can be violent, seems like something is wrong. A LOT of theatre. Wheelspin on each shift if you want with basic tires. Would be scary with a manual, in my hands.

exigegus, on level ground or downhill I just skip first and pull out in second in the Si.

White is about as boring as it gets, look into any parking lot on earth and we have endless black , white, gray. Like early 1960s TV, before color came along. But we had a white Evora with a blue interior for a while that was very special.

At the end of the day, get what floats your own boat. Life is short, this is not a rehersal. The clutch upgrade fixes the Evora issue. A Lotus is made for drivers, not riders.
 

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2020 Evora GT in Formula Red, coordinated black+red interior, windowed engine hatch
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that being said, maybe it’s the part of the country you are in, in my part of the country, most rental cars are not white, they are black, red, blue, silver & grey.
I don't rent cars at home, I rent them when I travel. Most of my domestic business travel is to the west coast, southeast, and Great Lakes region. Walk to the rental car parking area/structure at the major airports and it's a sea of white cars. Sure, lots of other colors too but white dominates like there's no second place.

The good news is that we can each have our opinion and fortunately Lotus offers more than one color! I'm on record here that British Racing Green is my ideal on a Lotus, and frankly red is almost a cliche on sports cars so it was not even my second choice. However, an awesome dealer offered me a killer deal on a brand new, fresh off the boat 2020 Evora GT and red was Just Fine, Thank You!

To be honest, though, if it had been white I would have turned it down instantly. I drove a 2017 Evora 400 that looked better than factory new, that I could have had for ~$20K less than mine. It drove perfectly but once I got out, and walked around it, and tried to imagine convincing myself every day that "I can live with white" I just couldn't do it. Yes, the three years newer model year and fresh factory warranty played a big role too, but if it had been BRG I'd probably be driving the 2017 today. White... nope, just can't go there. I'm glad you like it... that way we're both happy!
 

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Ewww... plain old white? It will look like every rental car, every fleet truck, every generic "too cheap to pay for anything but the default color" car to roll out of Detroit. To each his own, and I understand it's a personal thing, but nothing screams "generic" to me like white on a car. Any car. Not even a Lotus overcomes the stigma of titanium dioxide.
So let me make sure I'm clear. You're not a fan of white cars? :ROFLMAO:
 
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And I never realized it until I started shopping for a Lotus. The best looking white car I've ever seen was a Lotus, but it was still... just plain, old, commonplace, run of the mill, average, boring white. I could not imagine spending that kind of money on a white car, nor kicking myself for such a mistake every time I saw it at home. To each his own.
 

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Thank god I'm not getting a white car. :LOL:
 
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