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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello, I've been driving our both old family car and one of my company car for around 10+ years, not sure what those car was as they was some common old 4 seat car. I had only once accidentally scratch one of them on my early driving day, beside that I considered myself a safe driver, I don't speed randomly or park recklessly etc.

I'm been following lotus for yearsss, once test drive an elise few years ago but the interior and comfortable was quite disappointed, but fortunately now I'm glad and looking forward to get an emira for my upcoming birthday, since there is no news on future car and possibility 2026 for next lotus sport car after some suv right?

Main thing that concerned me was that, I'm not sure which car part I should take, I do research about each car part for example v6 or i4 but still not sure about most of them.
I'm more into appearance for example the GT half green/black painting version, sound of v6 do impressed me far more than i4 and also comfortable.

Hoping to seek some advise here, and yes I do have plan of taking a legal driving course from legal pros racer in my country, as I heard they could teach you how to handle a sport car more efficiently and safety etc.

Few question please, if that's allow: (due all respect, please keep in mind I don't fancy racing setting)
1. Was DCT an Automatic, with paddle shift? (I prefer it's look over manual gearbox, easy to drive around traffic area)
2. Was all DCT Auto switchable from between manual, how was the DCT manual mode work without leg clutch? (I drived basic auto and manual)
3. Should I wait for 2nd edition, would 2nd edition still have toyota v6 option, or was it electric? (I really prefer v6 over i4)
4. If the limited GT version are out of option, was it possible to get a similar painting on 1st/2nd edition emira?
5. Does emira has seat adjustment for Height? (unfortunately I'm around 168, elise are low for me)
6. Does emira has front cam, or do I need a custom? (I'm worrying of speed bump as my country has lot of it)
7. Does emira has Lift System, if not, can I install a custom? (again speed bump issue)
8. Safest way of handling speed bump please?
9. Can I swap owned car+/-money for future car? (Was looking forward the 2026 sport car, emira rear design was not my taste)
10. Could you guys share some critical advise please? (Can't think of somethings yet, as some already learn from google)

In case you're asking, I'm buying it with my own hard earn money, I could afford full cash but I'm taking loan as suggested, I don't have any liabilities debt and I don't worry about car tax as I work for gov.
I've been long love for lotus and I got traveling plan as soon as covid clam down, so I'm getting emira for sure, just not sure about the car parts stuff.
Sorry it was a long post, I sincerely hope I could learn more from so many experienced driver here, so I could get emira without any future misgiving, also in return if you like, I would happy to invite you for a good meal as favour, I'm a malaysian.
 

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You’re wayyyy overthinking it. Wait until they come out, get a few test drives, and then decide. There are lots of intangibles when it comes to these questions, and how I feel about my own preferences will not apply to yours. It’s sounds like you’re not the most well-versed with sports cars, so I wouldn’t try to make such a decision from a computer if I were you.
 

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I appreciate that English isn't your first language, but your post is SUPER hard to read and honestly most of your questions are already answered. You just need to do a search and start reading. If you're going to be spending $100k (and probably more in Malaysia, where that's pretty big money), you should do some research of your own.

You should also wait for Lotus to tell you what will be available in Malaysia, there may not be a V6 or i4 option for example. Get in touch with a dealer and start getting official information from them.
 

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You could also go to the Lotus website, and select the contact button and send them a request for more information about their plans to sell and support the car in your country. If they aren't going to officially sell it there, then you would have to import one on your own, and that can be a very expensive and lengthy process, if it's even possible, depending on government regulations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You’re wayyyy overthinking it. Wait until they come out, get a few test drives, and then decide. There are lots of intangibles when it comes to these questions, and how I feel about my own preferences will not apply to yours. It’s sounds like you’re not the most well-versed with sports cars, so I wouldn’t try to make such a decision from a computer if I were you.
Sound like one of my best buddy, he told me the same that I over thinking about it. I'll keep this in mind once emira test drive was available here. In short yes of course asking on internet was my last resort.

You should also wait for Lotus to tell you what will be available in Malaysia, there may not be a V6 or i4 option for example. Get in touch with a dealer and start getting official information from them.
I checked all emira thread before posting and just done a 2nd checked, doesn't seems helpful unless I miss something. Or any good suggest for searching for such detail?
Yes already contact with our only lotus dealer in my country, they just telling me they are still waiting for more info coming in before they can give us an proper official announce.

You could also go to the Lotus website, and select the contact button and send them a request for more information about their plans to sell and support the car in your country. If they aren't going to officially sell it there, then you would have to import one on your own, and that can be a very expensive and lengthy process, if it's even possible, depending on government regulations.
Will give it a try about using their website thanks. ok about importing.. might be a headache about it's process but shouldn't be a problem, the local dealer told us emira should be coming in, but they doesn't have much info yet, hopefully no need for importing.


So I guess I should ask somewhere else for my basic newbie question?
 

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1. V6 and paddles......don't revisit those decisions.
2. For many years to come keep repeating this important saying to yourself > speed will come.
I've instructed at many Driver's Schools over the years and this is one bit of knowledge I make my students learn but
more importantly make them understand.....and it's that speed will come. A single day with an instructor will be a big
help but it will also fly by so fast you'll only retain a little of it.
3. There is no substitute for seat time.......not even driving in a simulator. Simulators can be a help but it's not the same.
4. Get a first edition because you can always get a second edition after the fact if you find them better for your own
definition of the word 'better'
 

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Few question please, if that's allow: (due all respect, please keep in mind I don't fancy racing setting)
1. Was DCT an Automatic, with paddle shift? (I prefer it's look over manual gearbox, easy to drive around traffic area)
2. Was all DCT Auto switchable from between manual, how was the DCT manual mode work without leg clutch? (I drived basic auto and manual)
3. Should I wait for 2nd edition, would 2nd edition still have toyota v6 option, or was it electric? (I really prefer v6 over i4)
4. If the limited GT version are out of option, was it possible to get a similar painting on 1st/2nd edition emira?
5. Does emira has seat adjustment for Height? (unfortunately I'm around 168, elise are low for me)
6. Does emira has front cam, or do I need a custom? (I'm worrying of speed bump as my country has lot of it)
7. Does emira has Lift System, if not, can I install a custom? (again speed bump issue)
8. Safest way of handling speed bump please?
9. Can I swap owned car+/-money for future car? (Was looking forward the 2026 sport car, emira rear design was not my taste)
10. Could you guys share some critical advise please? (Can't think of somethings yet, as some already learn from google)
1. DCT is a type of automatic transmission, with two internal clutches that alternately engage to make gear shifts. A DCT can come with paddle shifters or not. It will have paddle shifters on the Emira.
2. The manual mode with any automatic transmission just means it lets you choose the gear. The transmission still does all of the shifting so there is no clutch.
3. No one knows this currently, except for Lotus themselves... It won't be electric, however.
4. Not sure... need to ask Lotus
5. The seat is electric, so I think height should be one of the adjustments. I'd be really surprised if it isn't.
6. No, not that I'm aware of.
7. No
8. The angle crawl, so that one wheel is always on the bump. This doesn't solve approach angle issues, however.
9. Something you have to ask the dealer if they take trade-ins.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
1. V6 and paddles......don't revisit those decisions.
2. For many years to come keep repeating this important saying to yourself > speed will come.
I've instructed at many Driver's Schools over the years and this is one bit of knowledge I make my students learn but
more importantly make them understand.....and it's that speed will come. A single day with an instructor will be a big
help but it will also fly by so fast you'll only retain a little of it.
3. There is no substitute for seat time.......not even driving in a simulator. Simulators can be a help but it's not the same.
4. Get a first edition because you can always get a second edition after the fact if you find them better for your own
definition of the word 'better'
Glad to learn about these.. I'll make sure to keep in mind, thank you for your wise words.

1. DCT is a type of automatic transmission, with two internal clutches that alternately engage to make gear shifts. A DCT can come with paddle shifters or not. It will have paddle shifters on the Emira.
2. The manual mode with any automatic transmission just means it lets you choose the gear. The transmission still does all of the shifting so there is no clutch.
3. No one knows this currently, except for Lotus themselves... It won't be electric, however.
4. Not sure... need to ask Lotus
5. The seat is electric, so I think height should be one of the adjustments. I'd be really surprised if it isn't.
6. No, not that I'm aware of.
7. No
8. The angle crawl, so that one wheel is always on the bump. This doesn't solve approach angle issues, however.
9. Something you have to ask the dealer if they take trade-ins.
Oh so all emira edition was the last non-electric car. I sent an email early today as other guy suggested, hopefully I could get more detail from lotus team.
DCT paddle shifters and electric seat, that's really interesting. Angle crawl and trade-ins.. good to learn something new everyday, thank you for sharing.
 

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Even if height is not a option on the Emira seat (which is should be), the driving position is dead on perfect; one of Lotus' signatures. Most never wanted the height changed on the Evora when it was fixed.
 

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Since you like the V6 sound, go for the V6 manual. A visceral driving experience is Lotus's hallmark. A more aggressive sound and power level while engaging all 4 of your limbs are true to Lotus form. You seem interested in DCT. Try test driving some to understand the difference in feel. I test drove some PDK Caymans (arguably among the best DCTs in the industry) and wasn't impressed from a driving theater standpoint. The main draw of DCT is for efficient acceleration or minimizing lap times. But your right arm and left foot are no longer mechanical components engaged in the power transmission process. You lose all that fidelity of information exclusive to that man-to-machine communication interface.

There are reputable companies that make aftermarket air lift systems you can control through your phone's Bluetooth to various height settings. I expect Emira will be a hit among younger enthusiasts into the "stance" scene based on feedback I've seen. Watch out for an aftermarket air lift system to debut at SEMA. I've had a few low cars and never needed a lift system, just had to approach dips/speed bumps at an angle which geometrically shortens the amount of front bumper overhang until your tire makes contact, reducing the chance or amount of scraping. You also have to drive slower than normal. If it's an extreme dip/bump, turn on your hazard lights early as a warning if any cars are following close behind. I complemented this with underbody protective strips (search Scrape Armor or SLIPLO or the cheap, lower quality EZ Lip I find at local hardware or auto parts stores). There will be optional front parking indicators that will beep before you come too close to hitting something but no front cameras (only backup camera).

I had a Malaysian friend/coworker who took me to his favorite spots when I worked at a big tech company. Nasi lemak and chicken rendang were my favorites.
 

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I'll do my best to answer your questions below, and my answers will be in bold text.

Few question please, if that's allow: (due all respect, please keep in mind I don't fancy racing setting)
1. Was DCT an Automatic, with paddle shift? (I prefer it's look over manual gearbox, easy to drive around traffic area)
DCT stands for Dual Clutch Transmission, and it is an automatic

2. Was all DCT Auto switchable from between manual, how was the DCT manual mode work without leg clutch? (I drived basic auto and manual)
You can manually change gears with either paddles or the gear shift knob on the center console, but the transmission handles all the changes. There isn't a manual clutch.

3. Should I wait for 2nd edition, would 2nd edition still have toyota v6 option, or was it electric? (I really prefer v6 over i4)
The 2nd edition should still have the V6 option. Lotus has said they're going to use it for the next 5 years, and then they won't be able to use it anymore. The 2nd edition will be cheaper than the First edition, because it won't come bundled with all the options the First edition will have.

4. If the limited GT version are out of option, was it possible to get a similar painting on 1st/2nd edition emira?
Unless Lotus makes that a paint option for a non-GT4 car (not likely), you'd have to pay a custom paint shop to do that for you, and that will be expensive.

5. Does emira has seat adjustment for Height? (unfortunately I'm around 168, elise are low for me)
The First edition comes standard with 12-way electric adjustable seats, so I'm positive you'll be able to adjust it upward as one of the 12 adjustments. The 2nd edition will come with the standard 4-way seat, which I'm guessing would be forward, backward, up and down. The 12-way seat will be a cost option for the 2nd edition.

6. Does emira has front cam, or do I need a custom? (I'm worrying of speed bump as my country has lot of it)
No. The First edition does not. We don't know what might become available for the 2nd edition. You'll have to go with a 3rd party system for that.

7. Does emira has Lift System, if not, can I install a custom? (again speed bump issue)
No. The First edition does not. Again, as above, you'll have to go with a 3rd party system. There might be a system that offers both, which is not a bad idea, however it will add weight, and we don't know what the underside of the front of the Emira looks like, or what kind of space is going to be available in the front to add a system like that. The angle approach as @Nova mentioned if you have the room to do it, is the best way to go over a speed bump to protect the front. However from the drawings, it looks like the Emira will have almost 8 inches (20cm) of front clearance which should be enough for any speed bump. The bigger concern would be approaching or leaving a steep driveway.

8. Safest way of handling speed bump please?
Approach at an angle to get one of the wheels to go over it first, so you don't get the drop bounce from having both front wheels go over it at the same time.

9. Can I swap owned car+/-money for future car? (Was looking forward the 2026 sport car, emira rear design was not my taste)
You can always trade a car in, but you won't get as much money for it as you would if you sell it privately. The advantage of trading it in is simply convenience, compared to having to prepare it for sale, advertise and hope for a buyer.

10. Could you guys share some critical advise please? (Can't think of somethings yet, as some already learn from google)
If Lotus doesn't have a dealer where you are, then it will be very risky for parts and service; especially in a foreign country where Lotus doesn't have any kind of sales presence. In your situation, I wouldn't rely on it as your only car if there's no dealer in your country. That's not to say it might not be reliable, but if there is a problem, you'll be stuck for a long time before getting it fixed.

In case you're asking, I'm buying it with my own hard earn money, I could afford full cash but I'm taking loan as suggested, I don't have any liabilities debt and I don't worry about car tax as I work for gov.
I've been long love for lotus and I got traveling plan as soon as covid clam down, so I'm getting emira for sure, just not sure about the car parts stuff.
Sorry it was a long post, I sincerely hope I could learn more from so many experienced driver here, so I could get emira without any future misgiving, also in return if you like, I would happy to invite you for a good meal as favour, I'm a malaysian.
 

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Since you like the V6 sound, go for the V6 manual. A visceral driving experience is Lotus's hallmark. A more aggressive sound and power level while engaging all 4 of your limbs are true to Lotus form. You seem interested in DCT. Try test driving some to understand the difference in feel. I test drove some PDK Caymans (arguably among the best DCTs in the industry) and wasn't impressed from a driving theater standpoint. The main draw of DCT is for efficient acceleration or minimizing lap times. But your right arm and left foot are no longer mechanical components engaged in the power transmission process. You lose all that fidelity of information exclusive to that man-to-machine communication interface.

There are reputable companies that make aftermarket air lift systems you can control through your phone's Bluetooth to various height settings. I expect Emira will be a hit among younger enthusiasts into the "stance" scene based on feedback I've seen. Watch out for an aftermarket air lift system to debut at SEMA. I've had a few low cars and never needed a lift system, just had to approach dips/speed bumps at an angle which geometrically shortens the amount of front bumper overhang until your tire makes contact, reducing the chance or amount of scraping. You also have to drive slower than normal. If it's an extreme dip/bump, turn on your hazard lights early as a warning if any cars are following close behind. I complemented this with underbody protective strips (search Scrape Armor or SLIPLO or the cheap, lower quality EZ Lip I find at local hardware or auto parts stores). There will be optional front parking indicators that will beep before you come too close to hitting something but no front cameras (only backup camera).

I had a Malaysian friend/coworker who took me to his favorite spots when I worked at a big tech company. Nasi lemak and chicken rendang were my favorites.
I hate it when folks say this about engaging all 4 limbs. When using the paddles, and left foot braking (truly a higher level skill-surprised how long its taking me to start a drive in left foot mode), you are using all 4 limbs....just a technicality to avoid the sense of superiority it seems the manual crowd is entertaining. Remember, I too have a manual. Again, acceleration is the least important component of IPS/DCT. Its the precision of the high speed downshift at corner entry that a manual can't match anymore. By using left foot, your trail braking skills are now optimized btw. I believe its a mandatory F1 skill so it must be......just keepin the manual bs in check.

Back to op, I'd have to experience your actual shifting skills before making a recommendation. I never seem to be amazed how many folks think they have the skills.....NOT! when instructing. Many folks are even better off letting the tranny do its job so they can concentrate on the driving in the auto world.
You are entering the sports car world at a pretty high level FYI.

Finally, I find Novas statement interesting about a DCT w/o paddles? Name me one please?
 

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I hate it when folks say this about engaging all 4 limbs. When using the paddles, and left foot braking (truly a higher level skill-surprised how long its taking me to start a drive in left foot mode), you are using all 4 limbs....just a technicality to avoid the sense of superiority it seems the manual crowd is entertaining. Remember, I too have a manual. Again, acceleration is the least important component of IPS/DCT. Its the precision of the high speed downshift at corner entry that a manual can't match anymore. By using left foot, your trail braking skills are now optimized btw. I believe its a mandatory F1 skill so it must be......just keepin the manual bs in check.
I think you're taking this completely the wrong way. I didn't see any snobbish "superiority" in the statement; it was more of a physical description of the difference in physical engagement of a clutch and gear shift lever, versus no clutch and a paddle. I too learned left foot braking when I drove karts way back when, but I do not recommend that for novices on the street. In a panic situation, the safety risk of unintentionally pushing the gas pedal at the same time as the brake is too great. As you pointed out, left foot braking is a higher level skill, and I would say only for track. It takes too long to become skilled at it, and the risk of momentary confusion in a panic situation on the street is just too high, especially for someone who hasn't had the track experience to develop the skill. It's more efficient on the track, and allows for a greater degree of finesse and control, but that's a situation where you are 100% focused on what you're doing and what's going on. On the street there are just too many possible variables and distractions.
 

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I hate it when folks say this about engaging all 4 limbs. When using the paddles, and left foot braking (truly a higher level skill-surprised how long its taking me to start a drive in left foot mode), you are using all 4 limbs....just a technicality to avoid the sense of superiority it seems the manual crowd is entertaining. Remember, I too have a manual. Again, acceleration is the least important component of IPS/DCT. Its the precision of the high speed downshift at corner entry that a manual can't match anymore. By using left foot, your trail braking skills are now optimized btw. I believe its a mandatory F1 skill so it must be......just keepin the manual bs in check.

Back to op, I'd have to experience your actual shifting skills before making a recommendation. I never seem to be amazed how many folks think they have the skills.....NOT! when instructing. Many folks are even better off letting the tranny do its job so they can concentrate on the driving in the auto world.
You are entering the sports car world at a pretty high level FYI.

Finally, I find Novas statement interesting about a DCT w/o paddles? Name me one please?
I did consider the use of all 4 limbs with DCT paddles when I wrote that. But the range of limb movement and amount and variety of information fed back is much greater in a manual vs the PDK I drove. DCT is technically superior for track use like I said--you just expanded on that point we agree on. No sense of superiority intended, purely personal observation. I am seriously considering the Z06 and can't even discuss it in some social media groups I'm in (particularly Manual Elitist Jerks will ban me) so I'm no manual-only diehard. I just see it as a rare gift when a modern higher performance sports car offers it.
 

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Finally, I find Novas statement interesting about a DCT w/o paddles? Name me one please?
The OP was apparently not familiar with what a DCT transmission is, and its relationship with paddle shifters or a clutch. I was merely stating a physical fact. There is nothing about a DCT that requires it to be equipped with shifting paddles. Sure, they put paddle shifters on everything these days. Even my family van has them. I do so enjoy the excitement of left-foot braking around the corner while I use the paddle shifters and the gas to keep the engine in that sweet VTEC zone. :rolleyes:
 

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Are pedals lined up on the IPS to be more centered or are gas and brake slanted to the right? It's not easy to get the left foot on the brake when they skewed to the left. Maybe I need to move the seat closer?
 

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I think you're taking this completely the wrong way. I didn't see any snobbish "superiority" in the statement; it was more of a physical description of the difference in physical engagement of a clutch and gear shift lever, versus no clutch and a paddle. I too learned left foot braking when I drove karts way back when, but I do not recommend that for novices on the street. In a panic situation, the safety risk of unintentionally pushing the gas pedal at the same time as the brake is too great. As you pointed out, left foot braking is a higher level skill, and I would say only for track. It takes too long to become skilled at it, and the risk of momentary confusion in a panic situation on the street is just too high, especially for someone who hasn't had the track experience to develop the skill. It's more efficient on the track, and allows for a greater degree of finesse and control, but that's a situation where you are 100% focused on what you're doing and what's going on. On the street there are just too many possible variables and distractions.
40yrs of instincts suggest in a panic situation the right foot will still do its job till i have at least 10000 reps under my belt.
 

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Ergonomics 101 time
Mi1 is the fingers
Mi2 is the wrists
Mi3 is the elbows
Mi4 is the shoulders
Mi5 is the torso
The lower the number , the greater the precision. Non debatable facts from my training way back in the late 80's. First school in the country to teach ergonomics.
Are pedals lined up on the IPS to be more centered or are gas and brake slanted to the right? It's not easy to get the left foot on the brake when they skewed to the left. Maybe I need to move the seat closer?
Yes, try one click. Your wrist should lay over steering wheel while arm is bent at elbow in a comfortable position.
 

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Yes, try one click. Your wrist should lay over steering wheel while arm is bent at elbow in a comfortable position.
It's turning the left leg over the right that is uncomfortable. I have the steering wheel that close already. I'll try moving the seat and steering column both equally forward and see the rotation is easier.

If the car was meant for two foot driving, shouldn't the pedals be centered to the steering column?
 

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40yrs of instincts suggest in a panic situation the right foot will still do its job till i have at least 10000 reps under my belt.
Now imagine you're half that age with only a couple years of driving experience. For some like you who are already trained with years of experience, it's the way to go on the track, but for those who aren't, I don't recommend it on the street.
 
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